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15 Officers in Illinois Are Charged in F.B.I. Sting

Rating:
5/5,
  1. chillinwill
    Fifteen Illinois law enforcement officers were charged Tuesday in an F.B.I. sting on counts that included accepting cash in exchange for providing armed protection for drug dealing operations in south suburban Chicago.

    Patrick J. Fitzgerald, United States attorney for the Northern District of Illinois, who described the charges as “particularly shocking,” said two of the officers helped an undercover Federal Bureau of Investigation agent unload and deliver duffel bags stuffed with drugs that had been flown in on a private plane.

    “Ideally, it should be hard to find one corrupt officer,” Mr. Fitzgerald said in a written statement, “and it should never be easy to find 15 who allegedly used their guns and badges to protect people they believed were dealing drugs, instead of arresting them.”

    The defendants were charged with conspiracy to possess and distribute cocaine and/or heroin in drug dealing operations that played out in parking lots at suburban shopping centers and hotels. They include 10 Cook County sheriff’s correctional officers, two of whom are on active duty with the National Guard in Afghanistan; four officers with the suburban Harvey Police Department; and one Chicago police officer. Two other men who were not affiliated with the law enforcement agencies were charged as well.

    According to the United States attorney’s office, two of those charged, Ahyetoro A. Taylor and Raphael Manuel, provided protection in May for a man who they believed was brokering large-scale drug transactions but was an undercover F.B.I. agent.

    Officials said Mr. Taylor and Mr. Manuel boarded a small aircraft at the DuPage airport, piloted by two other undercover agents, and began counting packages stuffed inside four duffel bags that were said to be carrying a total of 176 pounds of cocaine.

    The officers then helped the undercover agent remove the duffel bags from the plane and carry them through the airport to the agent’s car, then watched in a nearby parking lot as another undercover agent took the bags and drove away, the United States attorney’s office said.

    Officials said the agent posing as the drug broker then paid Mr. Taylor and Mr. Manuel $4,000 each. Officials said the agent paid a total of $44,000 to 16 of the defendants.

    The sting also revealed police officers protecting a high-stakes poker game, providing security for the transportation of large amounts of cash and selling powder cocaine, according to Robert D. Grant, special agent in charge of the Chicago office of the F.B.I.

    “The almost systemic corruption that this investigation uncovered is quite troubling, especially given that most of those charged are sworn law enforcement officers,” said Mr. Grant in a written statement. “One would have hoped that the many public corruption investigations that have previously been announced would have served to deter this type of conduct. Apparently, that is not the case.”

    Efforts to find or contact lawyers for the suspects were not successful on Tuesday evening.

    December 2, 2008
    New York Times
    http://www.nytimes.com/2008/12/03/us/03corrupt.html?ref=us

Comments

  1. guldenat
    Admittedly I have no problem with what these officers did. Having said that, are we supposed to be surprised about corruption in Chicago?

    Interesting read anyway.
  2. Pope Albacore
    SWIM thinks that is pretty funny too. In America, the officials and politicians seem to think that if they act appalled by a certain situation (such as this one) that Joe Q. Public will actually believe that this type of thing is rare. As if the dark underbellies of our fair cities do not exist.

    Thing is, there are Americans that are so naive that they actually believe that every person with a badge is a good guy. Sadly, that is FAR from the truth. We live in a capitalist society; every man/woman for himself/herself.

    -Pope Albacore
  3. Alfa
    South Suburban Police Corruption Probe

    Harvey, IL. --

    Seventeen people -- including 15 south suburban police officers -- have been charged in a federal probe of allegations that officers provided armed security for large-scale drug deals.

    All 17 were charged Tuesday with conspiracy to possess and distribute kilogram quantities of cocaine and/or heroin in eight separate criminal complaints unsealed following arrests early Tuesday, according to a release from the U.S. Attorney's office.

    Seven of the eight complaints were supported by a single, 61-page FBI affidavit that outlines an undercover investigation that involved such activity as police officers protecting a high-stakes poker game, protecting transportation of large amounts of cash and two law officers actually selling powder cocaine, in addition to the routine activity of providing security for purported narcotics transactions, the release said.

    Fourteen of the defendants were either arrested or surrendered Tuesday and are expected to appear at 3 p.m. before U.S. Magistrate Judge Michael Mason in U.S. District Court.

    Arrest warrants were issued for Ahyetoro A. Taylor, 28, of Joliet; and Jermaine E. Bell, 37, of Lynwood, Cook County Sheriff’s officers who are on active military duty with Army National Guard units in Afghanistan. Another defendant, Archie Stallworth, 36, of Harvey, a Harvey police officer, was arrested Nov. 19 but the charges remained under seal until Tuesday, the relase said. He was released on bond and a preliminary hearing is scheduled for Dec. 4.

    According to a release, a six-passenger, twin propeller engine aircraft flew on May 13 into west suburban DuPage Airport where three men awaited its arrival. Two of them -- Taylor and Raphael Manuel, both Cook County Sheriff’s Office Correctional Officers -- accompanied someone whom they believed brokered large-scale drug transactions but, in fact, was an undercover FBI agent, the release said. They boarded the aircraft, operated by two other undercover agents, and began counting packages of what was purported to be at least 80 kilograms of cocaine inside four duffel bags.

    Taylor, Manuel and the undercover agent removed the duffels from the plane and took them through the airport lobby to the trunk of the agent’s car in the parking lot, the affidavit alleges. Taylor and Manuel, in a separate car, followed the agent to a nearby parking lot, where the agent parked and got into the officers’ vehicle. Together, the trio watched as yet another undercover agent arrived, removed the duffels and drove away. The FBI agent posing as the drug broker then paid Taylor and Manuel $4,000 each -- allegedly their most profitable payday in the corrupt relationship they began with the undercover agent at least a year earlier.

    The undercover agent, while posing as an employee of a business in south suburban Harvey, was the hub in multiple spokes of police corruption in which Taylor and Manuel -- often together with other officers they recruited -- allegedly provided armed security for purported cocaine and heroin transactions throughout the south suburbs in 2007 and 2008, the affidavit alleges.

    Of the 17 defendants, 10 are Cook County Sheriff’s correctional officers, four are Harvey police officers and one is a Chicago police officer. They allegedly accepted between $400 and $4,000 each on one or more occasions to serve as lookouts and be ready to intervene if real police or rival drug dealers attempted to interfere with transfers of cocaine and heroin, according to the affidavit.

    “Ideally, it should be hard to find one corrupt police officer and it should never be easy to find 15 who allegedly used their guns and badges to protect people they believed were dealing drugs instead of arresting them,” U.S. Atty. Patrick Fitzgerald said in the rlease. “And the involvement of some in off-loading and delivering what they thought were large shipments of drugs flown in by plane is particularly shocking."

    According to the common affidavit, the undercover agent paid a total of $44,000 to 16 of the defendants, not including an additional $1,000 to Stallworth. The largest shares allegedly were paid to Taylor ($15,000) and Manuel ($14,500), respectively, for providing security during alleged drug transactions.

    Among the others charged were:
    -- Tavis Ramsey, 31, of Chicago;
    -- Dwayne Williams, 42, of Country Club Hills;
    -- Antoine D. Dudley, 28, of Harvey, Harvey police officer;
    -- James Engram, Jr., 41, of Calumet City, Harvey police officer;
    -- Kyle T. Wilson, 31, of Chicago, Chicago police officer;
    -- Timothy Funches, 26, of Bellwood, sheriff's officer;
    -- Diallo Mingo, 34, of Calumet City, sheriff's officer;
    -- Antwon Funches, 34, of Chicago, sheriff’s officer:
    -- Antonio B. McCaskill, 30, of Harvey:
    -- Richard O. Hall Jr., 35, of Chicago, sheriff's officer;
    -- Robert L. Kelly, 32, of Glenwood, sheriff’s officer:
    -- Daniel L. Lee, 31, of Chicago, sheriff's officer: and
    -- Julius L. Scott Jr. , 34, of Richton Park, sheriff’s officer.

    http://www.myfoxchicago.com/myfox/p...n=2&locale=EN-US&layoutCode=TSTY&pageId=3.2.1
  4. Alfa
    FBI Sting Nabs 15 Officers

    More than a dozen people, most of them police officers, were charged Tuesday, accused of acting as lookouts during drug deals and poker games, and in some cases, dealing drugs themselves.

    The charges against 10 Cook County Sheriff's Office correctional officers, four Village of Harvey police officers and a Chicago police officer were announced by United States Attorney Patrick J. Fitzgerald and Robert D. Grant, Special Agent-in-Charge of the Chicago Office of the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

    In all, charges were brought against 17 people.

    In May, jail guards Ahyetoro Taylor and Raphael Manuel accompanied someone they thought brokered large-scale drug transactions but was really an undercover FBI agent, charges allege.

    A twin-propeller plane landed at the west suburban DuPage Airport, where they boarded and began counting what they thought was 80 kilograms of cocaine stashed in four duffel bags, according to federal authorities.

    They allegedly took the bags to the undercover FBI agent's car and watched as another undercover agent pulled up in a Mercedes, took the bags and drove off.

    Taylor and Manuel took $4,000 each, authorities said.

    In August, Harvey police officer Archie Stallworth accompanied an undercover agent to the DuPage Airport and accepted $1,000 after handling three duffel bags purportedly containing 30 kilograms of cocaine, the charges allege.

    "It’s kinda suspect, you walk in, he come in with three bags, you walk out with three bags. He go this way, you go that way. In an airport, that’s probably cause. It arouses suspicion," Stallworth allegedly said, not knowing his conversation with the undercover agent was being recorded.

    In another conversation, he also allegedly talked about the best way to exchange drugs without arousing suspicion.

    "The best spot for ya’ll to do that, believe it or not, is the train station. Fast food places, that’s where we (law enforcement) be looking. Sit there all day or they set up surveillance cameras," a separate affidavit, attached to the complaint against him, said.

    According to the common affidavit, the undercover agent paid a total of $44,000 to 16 of the defendants, not including an additional $1,000 to Stallworth.

    The largest shares allegedly were paid to Taylor ($15,000) and Manuel ($14,500), respectively, for providing security during alleged drug transactions. The "deals" involving the agent’s purported drug sources and customers -- all of whom were undercover FBI agents -- typically occurred in retail and hotel parking lots in the south suburbs of Homewood, Tinley Park, Oak Lawn, Matteson and Bolingbrook and were captured on audio and video recordings by the undercover and surveillance agents.

    In each instance, the undercover agent allegedly would determine that each officer was carrying a firearm and advised them that they were providing protection for transfers of narcotics, providing the specific amount of purported cocaine and/or heroin that was involved. The undercover agent would then pay each defendant after each transaction was completed.

    After establishing an allegedly corrupt relationship with Taylor and Manuel, the agent typically contacted them and asked them to recruit a specific number of other officers to work each security detail, the charges allege. The undercover agent also would meet with the members of each crew beforehand to discuss the quantity and type of drugs that were purportedly being transferred.

    Cook county Sheriff Tom Dart said that each of the men charged has been suspended with pay pending a hearing next week, where his office will request that each be suspended without pay. He will then request for their termination.

    Dart said that his own investigators suspected wrong-doing on behalf of the correctional officers in January of this year. They then learned that the FBI had been investigating the same men since the previous August.

    "The Harvey Police Department and the City of Harvey do not condone any type of corruption or illegal activity," acting Police Chief D. Eaves said in a press release. "Law enforcement officers are sworn to uphold the laws of the State of Illinois and of the United States and should be held to a higher standard."

    Eaves reiterated that the department takes the oath of the badge "very seriously" and that he will be moving for immediate disciplinary action against all of the officers and employees involved.

    Taylor and another suspect, Jermaine Bell, are currently serving with the Illinois National Guard in Afghanistan and will be arrested there.

    The following lists the eight separate cases and defendants charged in each complaint:

    United States v. Manuel and Bell

    Raphael Manuel allegedly accepted a total of $14,500 for providing security for eight separate staged drug transactions, including one on Sept. 14, 2007, with Ahyetoro Taylor and Jermaine Bell, who allegedly accepted $500 for working a single staged deal on that date.

    United States v. Ramsey and Kyle T. Wilson

    Tavis Ramsey allegedly accepted a total of $1,900 for providing security for four separate purported drug transactions, including one on Oct. 24, 2007, with Ahyetoro Taylor, Raphael Manuel and Kyle Wilson, 31, of Chicago and a Chicago police officer, who allegedly accepted $500 for working a single staged deal.

    United States v. Timothy Funches, Jr., and Diallo S. Mingo

    Timothy Funches, 26, of Bellwood and Diallo Mingo, 34, of Calumet City, both of the Cook County Sheriff’s Office, allegedly accepted $1,000 each for providing security with Ahyetoro Taylor and Raphael Manuel for a single purported transaction involving 50 kilograms of cocaine and 2 kilograms of heroin on Nov. 16, 2007.

    United States v. Taylor, Antwon Funches and Antonio B. McCaskill

    Ahyetoro Taylor allegedly accepted a total of $15,000 for providing security for nine separate staged drug transactions, including one on Nov. 30, 2007, with Raphael Manuel, Antwon Funches, 34, of Chicago, a Cook County Sheriff’s officer, and Antonio McCaskill, 30, of Harvey, who is not a law enforcement officer, with the latter two allegedly accepting $1,000 each for working a single staged deal.

    United States v. Daniel L. Lee and Julius L. Scott, Jr.

    Daniel Lee, 31, of Chicago, and Julius Scott, 34, of Richton Park, both of Cook County Sheriff’s Office, allegedly accepted $1,000 each for providing security with Ahyetoro Taylor and Raphael Manuel for a single purported transaction involving two kilograms of heroin on Dec. 10, 2007.

    United States v. Richard O. Hall, Jr., and Robert L. Kelly, Jr.

    Richard Hall, 35, of Chicago, and Robert Kelly, 32, of Glenwood, both of the Cook County Sheriff’s Office, allegedly accepted $1,000 each for providing security with Ahyetoro Taylor and Raphael Manuel for a single purported transaction involving two kilograms of heroin on Dec. 17, 2007.
    United States v. Dudley, Engram and Williams

    In events described above, Dwayne Williams allegedly received a total of $1,400, including $400 for a May 2007 security escort, and Williams and James Engram received $1,000 each, and Antoine Dudley accepted $1,200, the charges allege, for providing security for a purported transaction involving 25 kilograms of cocaine on Feb. 29, 2008.

    United States v. Stallworth

    Archie Stallworth allegedly received $1,000 for providing security for the purported transfer of 30 kilograms of cocaine at the DuPage Airport on Aug. 11, 2008.

    The Government is being represented by Assistant U.S. Attorneys April Perry and M. David Weisman.

    If convicted of conspiracy to possess and distribute more than five kilograms of cocaine and/or one kilogram of heroin, faces a mandatory minium sentence of 10 years in prison and a maximum of life in prison and a maximum fine of $4 million.

    http://www.nbcchicago.com/news/local/fbi-sting-120208.html

    [​IMG] Cop Bust May Be Largest in Chicago History
  5. TheContrivance
    I'm not surprised at all. I'm sure this goes on in a lot of bigger cities. Oh and if this is shocking go look at Miami.
  6. fnord

    I have no problem with ordinary people selling drugs whatsoever,i DO have a major problem with police selling drugs or protecting those who do while they turn around and pick and choose who they arrest,,these people have sworn to uphold and enforce the law, NOT ignore the law whenever there wallet tells them its ok to. Just because someone has money/power should not put them above the law. If a officer is willing to ignore laws and sell drugs or protect drug dealers what other things will they do?

    Now if these officers refused to arrest anyone for drug related offences that would be another thing completely,then in my eyes what they did would be at least semi justified.
  7. Alfa
    Fnord; you are not making any sense to me.
    Do you want Police officers to respect the law or not?
    Do you agree with PO's protecting drug dealers or with PO's arresting drug dealers?
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