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  1. chillinwill
    A drop in the quality of illegal drugs on the UK's streets has led to an increase in users interchanging and mixing the drugs they take.

    Drug takers are now mixing a powerful concoction of illegal drugs in an attempt to "top up" as they are no longer able to receive the same quality they did in the past, a new survey has claimed.

    Police forces around the country have reported a drop in the quality of powder and crack cocaine, for example, with one constabulary reporting seizing cocaine powder with purity levels of just two per cent.

    Twelve out of 20 areas surveyed also reported a decline in heroin quality, while the majority of areas also highlighted a fall in the MDMA content in ecstasy pills and a continuation of the long-term trend in poor quality amphetamine.

    The DrugScope street drug trends 2009 questioned some 70 drug services, police forces, drug action teams and service user groups in 20 towns and cities across the UK.

    This year's findings show a fall in the reported quality of illegal drugs available in most areas.

    The survey suggests the drop in the quality of drugs reported on UK streets could be accelerating a longer term trend towards "poly drug use" – where users take a variety of different substances in combination or at different times in an attempt to counter low quality drugs or experiment with alternatives.

    Some of the respondents in the annual survey added the switch to using a concoction of drugs, could mean they become less concerned about the quality of each individual substance.

    The survey found that in some areas of the country teenagers and younger adults are combining substances such as cocaine, ketamine, ecstasy, cannabis and alcohol.

    Commenting on the findings, DrugScope chief executive Martin Barnes said: "The shifting patterns of drug use identified in this year's survey are a reminder of the challenges faced by drug treatment services and police forces across the country.

    "While overall levels of drug use have remained relatively stable in recent years, the range of substances appearing on the radar of drug services and enforcement agencies appears to be increasing.

    "There has been a long-standing trend towards people using a varied menu of drugs, but it could be increasing because of the low quality substances that appear to be dominating the UK street drug market."

    He added: "The fact that older teens and young adults are increasingly combining substances including ketamine, cocaine, cannabis and cheap high-strength alcohol is particularly concerning. It's essential that adult and young people's treatment services have the capacity to support people who develop problems with a range of substances, including emerging drugs like ketamine and GHB."

    He also raised concern at the number of drugs agencies reporting problems with youngster taking "legal highs" such as GBL (gammabutyrolactone) and mephedrone.

    Friday September 11, 2009
    In The News
    http://www.inthenews.co.uk/news/crime/alarm-at-drug-users-mixing-$1326243.htm

Comments

  1. I<3Salvia
    It still amazes swim that neither the government nor the police forces that make and enforce these drugs being illegal ever look at themselves and see the true villains here. If these drugs were legal this mixing wouldn't happen as people wouldn't feel the need to substitute false, dirty, and unsatisfying alternatives for the chance to feel good.
  2. Horiz
    Not only are they mixing stuff for a half decent high, or taking stupidly high doses, but this is also why RCs are hitting the streets more and more - because they actually get you high.

    Unfortunately, this brought the attention to the authorities who are now taking them away. But are they taking them away? No, RC street dealers are now stocking up on bulk, waiting for them to become illegal and doubling their profits, not to mention they'll start cutting the hell outta them.

    Anyone notice a pattern? :thumbsdown:
  3. Smirnoff
    Users 'mix wider range of drugs'

    A decline in the quality of drugs is encouraging takers to use a wider range of substances, a report suggests.
    [IMGR="white"]http://www.drugs-forum.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=10902&stc=1&d=1254083957[/IMGR]
    But the study from UK information charity DrugScope warns treatment services may not have the capacity to help so-called "poly-drug" users.
    The information was compiled from data provided by 70 UK drug services, police forces and drug action teams.

    It confirms findings of a drop in the purity of cocaine but also suggests the quality of other drugs has fallen.

    Varied menu
    With drug prices stable or in decline, the 2009 edition of DrugScope's annual Street Drug Trends Survey says this may be accelerating a longer-term trend of people taking a variety of substances together or separately.

    It said the quality of heroin, ecstasy and illicit tranquilisers, was significantly lower.

    The report raises concerns that drug treatment services may not have the capacity to help poly-drug users - in particular those who use drugs which have only recently emerged, such as Ketamine and GHB.

    In 17 out of 20 areas studied by researchers, a drop was recorded in the quality of cocaine powder and crack.

    In Bristol, police reported seizing cocaine powder with
    purity levels as low as 2% and a Suffolk drug squad officer told the survey that the purity of crack in Ipswich had dropped from 60% to 20% within the space of a few years.

    Some 12 out of the 20 areas reported a decline in heroin quality, while a majority also recorded a fall in the MDMA content in ecstasy pills.

    Mr Barnes said there had been a long-term trend towards users combining a range of drugs, but suggested that the low-quality substances "dominating" the market may have accelerated this process.

    He added: "While overall levels of drug use have remained relatively stable in recent years, the range of substances appearing on the radar of drug services and enforcement agencies appears to be increasing.

    "The fact that older teens and young adults are increasingly combining substances including ketamine, cocaine, cannabis and cheap high-strength alcohol is particularly concerning."

    In Ipswich and Middlesbrough, researchers found that crack users were turning to alcohol and black market pharmaceuticals, whereas in Newcastle some were buying powder cocaine instead because it was cheaper.

    The report also warned that an increasingly "junk food" drug market was leading users to turn to less well-researched alternatives.

    In 18 of the 20 areas covered by the survey, ketamine was reported as being used by a growing number of young people.

    And for the first time in the survey's five-year history, some drug services expressed concerns about the use of the so-called "legal highs" such as GBL and mephedrone.

    Gary Sutton, head of drug services at the charity Release, said purity levels reflected the state of the drugs economy.

    "Dealers are getting more greedy, or, to put it more accurately, increasing the risk premium," he said.

    "There seems to be a longer chain from importer to the street and users, especially cocaine buyers, seem happy to buy lower grade substances.
    "Most heroin users will complain about their gear, but most will buy it anyway."

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/8249574.stm
  4. chillinwill
  5. enquirewithin
    "The fact that older teens and young adults are increasingly combining substances including ketamine, cocaine, cannabis and cheap high-strength alcohol is particularly concerning....."

    Cheap high strength alcohol-- the most dangerous of all, expect perhaps GBL, especially combined with almost anything else. Prohibition kills.
  6. Sven99
    It is positive to see alcohol reported as just another possible drug however. Normally reporting on drugs and alcohol is kept completely separate and people don;t associate the two.
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