1. Dear Drugs-Forum readers: We are a small non-profit that runs one of the most read drug information & addiction help websites in the world. We serve over 4 million readers per month, and have costs like all popular websites: servers, hosting, licenses and software. To protect our independence we do not run ads. We take no government funds. We run on donations which average $25. If everyone reading this would donate $5 then this fund raiser would be done in an hour. If Drugs-Forum is useful to you, take one minute to keep it online another year by donating whatever you can today. Donations are currently not sufficient to pay our bills and keep the site up. Your help is most welcome. Thank you.
    PLEASE HELP

Alcohol Taxes Have Clear Effect On Drinking

Rating:
3/5,
  1. robin_himself
    Full Title: Alcohol Taxes Have Clear Effect On Drinking - New Study Reports Re-Analyses Of Over 30 Years Of Research

    With many local and national governments currently debating proposals to raise alcohol taxes, a timely new study published online today in the February edition of Addiction journal finds that the more alcoholic beverages cost, the less likely people are to drink. And when they do drink, they drink less. After analyzing 112 studies spanning nearly four decades, researchers documented a concrete association between the amount of alcohol people drink and its cost.

    "Results from over 100 separate studies reporting over 1000 distinct statistical estimates are remarkably consistent, and show without doubt that alcohol taxes and prices affect drinking," said Alexander C. Wagenaar, Ph.D., a professor of epidemiology and health policy research at the
    University of Florida College of Medicine, and the senior author of the study. "When prices go down, people drink more, and when prices go up, people drink less."

    The consistency of the association between cost and consumption indicates that using taxes to raise prices on alcohol could be among the most effective deterrents to drinking that researchers have discovered, beating things like law enforcement, media campaigns or school programmes, said Wagenaar.

    The study, funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, also determined that tax or price increases affect the broad population of drinkers, including heavy drinkers as well as light drinkers, including teens as well as adults.

    Many studies have analysed how tax or price increases affect people's drinking habits, but the new study is the first to examine all of these findings as a whole, using a statistical procedure called meta-analysis. This technique allows researchers to draw conclusions that are not limited to specific policy changes or a single state or country, said Wagenaar.

    To obtain their findings, the researchers scoured through decades of studies examining links between price and alcohol use. The studies were all reported in English, but not limited to any single country. The data resulting from these reports were compiled and analyzed to glean more precise answers than can be obtained from just one study, Wagenaar noted.

    In a commentary in the same issue of Addiction, Frank Chaloupka, PhD, Professor of Economics at the University of Illinois at Chicago, describes the research as a "true tour de force," and adds, "these findings provide a strong rationale for using increases in alcoholic beverage taxes to promote public health by reducing drinking."

    Source

Comments

  1. robin_himself
    Alcohol Tax Increases Deter Drinking

    As leaders of many national, state and local governments debate whether to raise taxes on alcohol to boost revenues, their decisions also could influence how much their constituents imbibe in coming years, say University of Florida researchers.

    In a study to be published online Thursday in the journal Addiction, UF researchers report that the more alcohol costs, the less likely people are to drink it. And when they do drink, they drink less, a concrete association researchers documented after analyzing 112 studies spanning four decades. [imgr=white]http://www.drugs-forum.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=7003&stc=1&d=121210467 3[/imgr]

    "Results from over 100 separate studies reporting over 1,000 distinct statistical estimates are remarkably consistent, and show without doubt that alcohol taxes and prices affect drinking," said Alexander C. Wagenaar, Ph.D., a professor of epidemiology and health policy research at the UF College of Medicine and the senior author of the study. "When prices go down, people drink more, and when prices go up, people drink less."

    The consistency of this association between cost and consumption indicates that using taxes to raise prices on alcohol could be among the most effective deterrents to drinking that researchers have discovered, better than law enforcement, media campaigns or school programs, said Wagenaar.

    The study, funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, also determined that tax or price increases affect the broad population of drinkers, including heavy drinkers as well as light drinkers, and teens as well as adults.

    Many studies have analyzed how tax or price increases affect people's drinking habits, but the UF study is the first to examine all of these findings as a whole, using a statistical procedure called meta-analysis. This technique allows researchers to draw conclusions that are not limited to specific policy changes or a single state or country, said Wagenaar.

    Researchers scoured through decades of studies examining links between price and alcohol use. The studies were all reported in English but not limited to any single country. The data resulting from these reports were compiled and analyzed to glean more precise answers than can be obtained from just one study, Wagenaar noted.

    In a commentary in the same issue of Addiction, Frank Chaloupka, Ph.D., a professor of economics at the University of Illinois at Chicago, describes the research as a "true tour de force," and adds, "these findings provide a strong rationale for using increases in alcoholic beverage taxes to promote public health by reducing drinking."

    Source
  2. Burnt
    Re: Alcohol Tax Increases Deter Drinking

    Another attempt at government to control peoples behavior...a@%holes
  3. KunthyNurse
    If it is true that people drink less when it is expensive, why are the worst drinkers (what tourists tell me) come from Scandinavian Countries like Norway, Sweden, Denmark where the people pay for a bottle of whiskey more than US$ 100???

    Only Special Shops can sell alcohol and only during a few hours a day???


    Honestly, I believe people drink when they are sad or have some depression.
    If you are really depressed and you know alcohol (which is like a sedative, relax and the pain go away) then you do not care of the price.

    :)
    Here in Cambodia people get Oxazepam to stop drinking.:thumbsup:

    What do Doctors in Western Country give their patients?

    Greetings from Cambodia
    KunthyNurse
To make a comment simply sign up and become a member!