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  1. chillinwill
    A Mobile-area lawmaker said he hopes to "fast track" a bill to ban herbal incense that's being smoked as a marijuana substitute.

    The incense is known generally as "spice," but goes by many different brand names, and law-enforcement agencies warn that teenagers who smoke it can experience dangerous side effects.

    "This is a chemical that is being abused," state Rep. James O. Gordon, D-Saraland, said in a news release about the bill. "The sooner we address this, then the more successful we will be in keeping it out of the hands of children."

    Gordon's bill, HB697, would make it illegal to possess chemical compounds HU-210, JWH-018, JWH-073 and salvia divinorum.

    With only about a week remaining in the Legislature's regular session, Gordon is aware that he'll have to push the bill as "an overall safety issue."

    "It's one of those bills that the only one who would be against it would be someone who would do illegal drugs," Gordon said. "I think there's enough support in Montgomery to get it on the fast track."

    Police have said that spice is cropping up locally.

    At a town hall meeting Wednesday in Prichard, the city's interim police chief, Jimmie Gardner, said he had asked store owners to stop selling the leafy substance. Though he could not force it off the shelves, Gardner called his request "a first step."

    The Drug Enforcement Administration lists various product names for the incense, which it describes as "stealth marijuana." Among them are "K2," "Spice Gold," "Spice Silver," "Spice Diamond," "Genie" and "Yucatan Fire."

    As he held up a bag of it, Gardner told the crowd, "If you go and you find this in your child's room, you need to rid yourself of it because they're utilizing it in a way of getting high."

    By David Ferrara
    March 29, 2010
    AL
    http://blog.al.com/live/2010/03/bill_banning_drug_known_as_spi.html

Comments

  1. pfc0789
    LOL how about all the people who believe that oneself should be allowed to make their own decisions so long as you put nobody else in danger.....ugh politics
  2. Terrapinzflyer
    Hallucinogenic herb bill passes Senate
    Orr credits local woman with push to criminalize plant

    MONTGOMERY - The Alabama Senate on Thursday approved a bill that would classify an herb known as Salvia divinorum as a Schedule I controlled substance in the same category as drugs such as heroin, LSD and morphine.

    Sen. Arthur Orr, R-Decatur, who sponsored the bill, credited Deborah Soule of Huntsville, director of the Partnership for a Drug-Free Community, with keeping the issue in front of lawmakers.


    The legislation died in previous sessions.

    It now goes to the House, where it will be handled by Rep. Laura Hall, D-Huntsville.

    "Our agency has worked closely with the Alabama legislators to criminalize Salvia divinorum, a hallucinogenic herb that is gaining popularity among our youth," Soule said. "The passing of this bill through the Senate could not have happened without the tremendous support of the City of Huntsville and the Madison County delegation.

    "We hope the House will now follow suit because this is so important for the safety of our youth."

    At least 16 other states have already made the herb illegal, and similar bills are pending in the legislatures of six other states.

    Salvia divinorum is a sage-like plant that is related to the colorful flowers called salvia or red and blue sage. It's usually smoked or eaten and has hallucinogenic properties when used in large amounts.


    Friday, April 09, 2010
    By Bob Lowry
    Times Staff Writer

    http://www.al.com/news/huntsvilletimes/local.ssf?/base/news/1270804563258880.xml&coll=1
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