1. Dear Drugs-Forum readers: We are a small non-profit that runs one of the most read drug information & addiction help websites in the world. We serve over 4 million readers per month, and have costs like all popular websites: servers, hosting, licenses and software. To protect our independence we do not run ads. We take no government funds. We run on donations which average $25. If everyone reading this would donate $5 then this fund raiser would be done in an hour. If Drugs-Forum is useful to you, take one minute to keep it online another year by donating whatever you can today. Donations are currently not sufficient to pay our bills and keep the site up. Your help is most welcome. Thank you.
    PLEASE HELP
  1. chillinwill
    U.S. Rep. Bobby Scott scored a victory Wednesday in his bid to put an end to a law that imposes tougher penalties on people sent to prison for possessing crack cocaine than those who possess powder cocaine.

    The House Judiciary Committee approved the 3rd District Democrat's bill, known as the Fairness in Cocaine Sentencing Act, or HR3245.

    The bill from Scott, whose district includes Portsmouth and parts of Norfolk and extends up to Richmond, would end a law that requires a mandatory five-year sentence for possession of at least 5 grams of crack cocaine. Someone must possess at least 500 grams of powder cocaine to face the same mandatory sentence.

    The tougher penalty for crack was adopted in the 1980s.

    If approved, Scott's bill would make no distinction between the two forms of the drug, requiring a mandatory five-year sentence for possessing 500 grams or more of either type.

    The House panel voted 16-9 in support of the measure. Scott voted for it; the other local legislator on the committee, Republican Randy Forbes of the 4th District, opposed it.

    The stiffer penalty for crack, which is a cheaper form of the drug, has been criticized because it has disproportionately affected poor and black drug users.

    "For 20 years, the disparity between crack and powder cocaine sentencing has been a blight on our justice system," Michael Macleod-Ball, leader of the American Civil Liberties Union's Washington office, said in a statement. "This historic legislation is long overdue."

    The bill now moves to a full vote in the House. President Barack Obama and U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder also have called for an end to the sentencing disparity.

    By Bill Bartel
    July 30, 2009
    The Virginian-Pilot
    http://hamptonroads.com/node/517859

Comments

  1. machine_elf
    It's about time, the crack cocaine laws always reeked of institutional racism to me but there you go.
  2. dyingtomorrow
    The big question in SWIM's mind when he first learned about this was:

    Is the sentencing for both going DOWN to cocaine, or going UP to crack.

    SWIM would not say it is much of a victory if it is going up, and he noticed that enough republicans supported the bill to pass it, which always makes him suspicious. I'm not very clear headed right now, but it seems like the sentencing for crack has gone down from this bill - is that what others have gotten out of this article?

    SWIM wonders if they will jack the sentencing up for both after this now.
  3. thepieman1

    Answer:
    I'm kinda surprised about this law since cocaine and crack cocaine are exactly same substance besides the hydrochloride, which only affects water solubility and vaporisation temperature. It'd be like having a different rule for heroin if you promised to only smoke it instead of shoot it.
To make a comment simply sign up and become a member!