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  1. chillinwill
    Campaigners are demanding a review into the outlawing of mephedrone after the drug was reportedly cleared of blame over the deaths of two teenagers.

    The deaths of Louis Wainwright, 18, and Nicholas Smith, 19, from Scunthorpe, Lincolnshire, contributed to a furore over the then "legal high" after it was thought they had taken the drug.

    It was made illegal last month by the former government, becoming a class B drug, along with cannabis and amphetamines.

    But according to the BBC, toxicology reports showed that neither of the teenagers had mephedrone in their blood when they died.

    Campaigners called for a "fresh look at different ways of formulating drug policy".

    Professor Colin Blakemore, of the UK Drug Policy Commission, said: "The only good that might emerge from this fiasco is a long overdue review of drug control policy."

    Roger Howard, chief executive of the commission, said: "We believe the new Government has an opportunity to both better protect the public and save money by reshaping the architecture for decision-making. Getting the governance right will lead to better outcomes for every community in Britain, and rebuild trust between experts and politicians."

    More tests were being carried out to establish what, if any substances, the pair had taken.

    An inquest will be held later at North East Lincolnshire Coroner's Court.

    Humberside Police, who are investigating the deaths, originally said they had information to suggest they were linked to mephedrone, also known as M-Cat, miaow miaow and bubbles. In a statement at the time, they advised anyone who had taken the drug to seek medical treatment urgently.

    May 29, 2010
    Associated Press
    http://www.google.com/hostednews/ukpress/article/ALeqM5gmfGkPVeK9aHbdIR-CYJ-6GRuLQQ

Comments

  1. chillinwill
    Party drug death toll called into question

    Campaigners have called for a fresh look at how drugs policy is formulated after it emerged two teenagers whose deaths were linked to mephedrone had not taken the drug.

    The deaths of Louis Wainwright, 18, and Nicholas Smith, 19, led to a high-profile political and public clamour to criminalise the so-called legal high. It was outlawed last month by the former government, which made it a Class B substance equal to cannabis and amphetamines.

    However, according to reports yesterday, toxicology tests showed that neither of the teenagers, from Scunthorpe, had mephedrone in their blood when they died.

    Further analysis is being carried out to establish what substances, if any, the pair had taken, with an inquest to be held at a later date.

    The mephedrone ban was put in place after a number of other deaths thought to be linked to the drug, also known as M-Cat, meow meow and bubbles, including that of 19-year-old

    Jordan Kiltie, from Ayr.

    Humberside Police, which is investigating the deaths in Lincolnshire, originally said it had information to suggest they were linked to mephedrone. At the time, it advised anyone who had taken the drug to seek medical treatment urgently.

    Nicolas’s parents, Elaine and Tony, had called for mephedrone to be banned following their son’s death

    His father said: “I assume because it’s a legal drug he thought it was safe to take. It was clearly not the case because we have a son who has died, and a close friend of his as well.”

    At the time, the SNP joined those who branded the then Home Secretary “foolish” for failing to ban a controversial party drug linked to the deaths.

    Stewart Hosie, the party’s deputy leader at Westminster, accused Alan Johnson and the UK Government of dragging their feet on illegalising the drug.

    Last night, drug experts branded the rush to ban mephedrone a fiasco.

    Professor Colin Blakemore, of the UK Drug Policy Commission, said: “The only good that might emerge from this fiasco is a long-overdue review of drug control policy.”

    Roger Howard, chief executive of the commission, said: “We believe the new Government has an opportunity to both better protect the public and save money by reshaping the architecture for decision-making.

    “Getting the governance right will lead to better outcomes for every community in Britain, and rebuild trust between experts and politicians.”

    A Humberside Police spokeswoman could not confirm or deny the results of the toxicology tests on the two Scunthorpe teenagers.


    ALISON CAMPSIE
    May 29, 2010
    Herald Scotland
    http://www.heraldscotland.com/news/home-news/party-drug-death-toll-called-into-question-1.1031272
  2. Paradoxical Frog
    My cat is trying not to get too excited about this, but feels it is a good thing that people will maybe start to sit up and take notice of the fact that the current system just isn't working. Of course the tabloids won't go with any of this, they don't like being wrong or being made to look foolish (even though they do that themselves on a daily basis) so will probably stick to their guns over the whole issue. Their guns being the attitude of "all drugs are bad, so there".

    But anyway, this whole fiasco has been rather enlightening. Decriminalisation is probably a lot to hope for at this stage, but any scientific evidence based overhaul will hopefully be a good thing :)
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