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Popular Articles

  • Confessions of an EBay opium addict

    Columbus Day almost killed me. I woke up avalanched under a junkyard of pain, my body a trap of torn nerves and trashed organs. An oily rash of sweat had soaked through my pillow and into the mattress. I was coughing, confused and crazy with...
  • Iceland knows how to stop teen substance abuse but the rest of the world isn’t listening

    In Iceland, teenage smoking, drinking and drug use have been radically cut in the past 20 years. Emma Young finds out how they did it, and why other countries won’t follow suit. It’s a little before three on a sunny Friday afternoon and...
  • Substitute teacher under investigation after giving pills to students.

    ST. LOUIS, MO (KPLR) - A Riverview Gardens substitute teacher is under investigation. He is accused of giving dozens of pills to students. The pills are believed to be a papaya enzyme. The experts at the Missouri Poison Center at SSM Cardinal...
  • "Demon Gin" That Almost Destroyed 18th Century London

    Between 1700 and 1760, London was involved in a passionate but staggeringly destructive love affair with gin, popularly known as "the mother's ruin." The city was positively drowning in the stuff. By 1730, an estimated 7,000 gin shops (and...
  • The Junkie and the Addict: The Moral War on Drugs

    In “The Odyssey,” Homer refers to a substance which “banishes all care, sorrow, and anger.” Here, he is likely speaking of opium, a substance with the same active ingredient as the modern-day heroin. It seems that from Homer’s time to modern day...
  • Has the US Learned Its Lesson When it Comes to Prohibition?

    In desperation to make effective the floundering Prohibition on alcohol, the U.S. government — unable to convince the public consumption of booze constituted a moral transgression — intentionally poisoned the supply in a last-ditch attempt to...
  • Tests find drugs, alcohol in blood of Paris airport attacker.

    PARIS (AP) - Blood tests determined Sunday that a suspected Islamic extremist consumed drugs and alcohol before a frenzied spree of violence that ended when he took a soldier hostage at Paris' Orly Airport and was shot dead by her fellow...
  • CaveMan menu : woolly rhino in belgium, mushrooms in spain.

    WASHINGTON (AP) - Eating like a caveman meant chowing down on woolly rhinos and sheep in Belgium, but munching on mushrooms, pine nuts and moss in Spain. It all depended on where they lived, new research shows. Scientists got a sneak peek into...
  • How smartphones may curb teenage drug use.

    American teenagers are growing less likely to try drugs — and smartphones may be the reason. Faced with evidence showing that fewer teens are trying and regularly using illicit drugs, alcohol and cigarettes, some experts — and young people...
  • Illinois bill would lower drinking age to 18, but theres a catch.

    Springfield, Ill. (KMOV.com) - Would you allow your underage teen have an alcoholic drink in your presence when you're out to dinner? That's what's being proposed by some lawmakers in Illinois. "Why not? If they are with their parents as long...
  1. Family physician wants others like him to aid in fight against drug addiction.

    ST. LOUIS, Mo. (KMOV.com) - A family physician believes those in his position should be trained to fight the battle of drug addiction. Dr. David Glick of the Queen of Peace Center, in the Central West End, provides care for patients fighting the effects of drug addiction. It's an arena that he was once scared to venture in to. "Most family physicians are terrified to do it," Glick said. "I will admit I was once terrified initially, but now I know this is very doable." Given the number...
  2. Study : Wide health disparities in Chicagos neighborhood.

    CHICAGO (AP) _ A hospital system’s study of Chicago neighborhoods finds wide health disparities, including with post-traumatic stress disorder. The Sinai Urban Health Institute released a survey Thursday drawing upon responses from roughly 2,000 residents in nine Chicago neighborhoods. Roughly 7 percent of U.S. adults experience PTSD during their lifetimes. However, residents in some Chicago neighborhoods report PTSD symptoms at more than four times that rate. The report says 34 percent of...
  3. Tests find drugs, alcohol in blood of Paris airport attacker.

    PARIS (AP) - Blood tests determined Sunday that a suspected Islamic extremist consumed drugs and alcohol before a frenzied spree of violence that ended when he took a soldier hostage at Paris' Orly Airport and was shot dead by her fellow patrolmen. The Paris prosecutors' office said toxicology tests conducted as part of an autopsy found traces of cocaine and cannabis in the blood of the suspect, Ziyed Ben Belgacem. He also had 0.93 grams of alcohol per liter of blood when he died Saturday,...
  4. How smartphones may curb teenage drug use.

    American teenagers are growing less likely to try drugs — and smartphones may be the reason. Faced with evidence showing that fewer teens are trying and regularly using illicit drugs, alcohol and cigarettes, some experts — and young people themselves — are speculating that the declining rates may be due to increased smartphone use. Helena Walker, a senior at Marist College, in Poughkeepsie, N.Y., is studying fashion design and finds she rarely leaves the studio. “I can’t take long breaks,...
  5. Confessions of an EBay opium addict

    Columbus Day almost killed me. I woke up avalanched under a junkyard of pain, my body a trap of torn nerves and trashed organs. An oily rash of sweat had soaked through my pillow and into the mattress. I was coughing, confused and crazy with anger. A throbbing, deep-pink chemical sunburn covered my face; my bowels were spitting hot mercury. I slid out of bed and dropped to the floor, the weight of a snarling mountain gorilla bearing down on me. I saw myself in the mirror as I fell. I looked...
  6. Has the US Learned Its Lesson When it Comes to Prohibition?

    In desperation to make effective the floundering Prohibition on alcohol, the U.S. government — unable to convince the public consumption of booze constituted a moral transgression — intentionally poisoned the supply in a last-ditch attempt to enforce State-mandated sobriety.
  7. Illinois bill would lower drinking age to 18, but theres a catch.

    Springfield, Ill. (KMOV.com) - Would you allow your underage teen have an alcoholic drink in your presence when you're out to dinner? That's what's being proposed by some lawmakers in Illinois. "Why not? If they are with their parents as long as they are responsible if they can vote, why not? They can serve in the military? Why can't they have a glass of wine or beer? "says Bradley Hammonds. That's the thinking behind a new proposal that would allow people as young as 18 to be served...
  8. CaveMan menu : woolly rhino in belgium, mushrooms in spain.

    WASHINGTON (AP) - Eating like a caveman meant chowing down on woolly rhinos and sheep in Belgium, but munching on mushrooms, pine nuts and moss in Spain. It all depended on where they lived, new research shows. Scientists got a sneak peek into the kitchen of three Neanderthals by scraping off the plaque stuck on their teeth and examining the DNA. What they found smashes a common public misconception that the caveman diet was mostly meat. They also found hints that one sickly teen used...
  9. Iceland knows how to stop teen substance abuse but the rest of the world isn’t listening

    In Iceland, teenage smoking, drinking and drug use have been radically cut in the past 20 years. Emma Young finds out how they did it, and why other countries won’t follow suit. It’s a little before three on a sunny Friday afternoon and Laugardalur Park, near central Reykjavik, looks practically deserted. There’s an occasional adult with a pushchair, but the park’s surrounded by apartment blocks and houses, and school’s out – so where are all the kids? Walking with me are Gudberg Jónsson,...
  10. Substitute teacher under investigation after giving pills to students.

    ST. LOUIS, MO (KPLR) - A Riverview Gardens substitute teacher is under investigation. He is accused of giving dozens of pills to students. The pills are believed to be a papaya enzyme. The experts at the Missouri Poison Center at SSM Cardinal Glennon say the pills could react to medications. A child could also be allergic to the enzyme. That could make the student sick. The incident happened Friday at West View Middle School in the Riverview Gardens School District Friday. A brand new...
  11. The Junkie and the Addict: The Moral War on Drugs

    In “The Odyssey,” Homer refers to a substance which “banishes all care, sorrow, and anger.” Here, he is likely speaking of opium, a substance with the same active ingredient as the modern-day heroin. It seems that from Homer’s time to modern day America, psychoactive substances have fascinated us throughout all of human history. Accordingly, different societies across the eras have invented standards governing their usage—ranging from regulation, to spiritual justifications, to prohibition....
  12. "Demon Gin" That Almost Destroyed 18th Century London

    Between 1700 and 1760, London was involved in a passionate but staggeringly destructive love affair with gin, popularly known as "the mother's ruin." The city was positively drowning in the stuff. By 1730, an estimated 7,000 gin shops (and probably many more if one was somehow able to count the untold illegal drinking dens) were catering to the trade, with some 10 million gallons of the spirit distilled each year. Historical accounts of violence, widespread addiction, and social devastation...
  13. The Opium Wars That Crushed - and Redefined - China

    The Opium Wars made it clear China had fallen gravely behind the West — not just militarily, but economically and politically. Every Chinese government since — even the ill-fated Qing Dynasty, which began the “Self-Strengthening Movement” after the Second Opium War — has made modernization an explicit goal, citing the need to catch up with the West. In 1839, England went to war with China because it was upset that Chinese officials had shut down its drug trafficking racket and confiscated...
  14. Lessons of the Opium Wars

    The Opium Wars have left an enduring sense of cultural antagonism between China and the West. The Opium Wars forced China to accommodate the British opium trade, and China's "Century of Humiliation" has led to many of its current foreign policies. While this chapter of Sino-British relations is glossed over by the British today, it has left a lingering sense of resentment among the Chinese. China's defeat by the superior technology of the British has taught the Chinese that "the...
  15. The Dark, Drunken History Behind Today's Sweetly Profitable Valentine's Day

    Valentine's Day is a time to celebrate romance and love and kissy-face fealty. But the origins of this festival of candy and cupids are actually dark, bloody — and a bit muddled. Though no one has pinpointed the exact origin of the holiday, one good place to start is ancient Rome, where men hit on women by, well, hitting them. Those Wild And Crazy Romans From Feb. 13 to 15, the Romans celebrated the feast of Lupercalia. The men sacrificed a goat and a dog, then whipped women with the...
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