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  • Scientists take big step toward finding non-addictive painkiller

    Coastal Plains Toad (Incilius nebulifer)CREDIT: DYP With the support of the National Institute on Drug Abuse, scientists at Wake Forest School of Medicine have been working to find a safe, non-addictive pain killer to help fight the current...
  • Fact or Fiction: Can You Really Sweat Out Toxins?

    There are plenty of good reasons to work up a sweat. Detoxifying your body isn’t one of them. Sweating is a bodily function that used to be taboo, with women in particular being told they don’t sweat, they glow. But look at any fashion magazine...
  • USA - 'Every dollar he touched was used for drugs': Couple accused of stealing some of $400,000

    A couple accused of stealing some of the $400,000 the public raised for a homeless man insist they were simply trying to stop him wasting it all on drugs. Johnny Bobbitt, 35, made headlines around the world in November after he used his last...
  • Secret tunnels discovered between the skull and the brain

    Study suggests immune cells rush through channels to get to injured tissue quickly Bone marrow, the spongy tissue inside most of our bones, produces red blood cells as well as immune cells that help fight off infections and heal injuries....
  • Oklahoma Medicaid tests new tactic to curb U.S. drug costs

    LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - A new front in the battle over the cost of expensive medicines in the United States is opening up in Oklahoma, the first state where the government’s Medicaid program is negotiating contracts for prescription drugs based...
  • Could garlic be the answer to beating antibiotic resistance?

    Scientists hope they have solved the growing threat of human resistance to antibiotics by reproducing a compound found in garlic. The compound ajoene has been created in a laboratory for the first time, raising hopes it could now be manufactured...
  • Psychedelic drugs promote neural plasticity in rats and flies

    This figure shows the effects of three psychedelics and one control (VEH) on cortical neurons. CREDIT:Ly et al.Psychedelic drugs may have mind-altering powers in the physical sense, too. A new study, published June 12 in the journal Cell...
  • This Man Took 140 Drugs and Wrote a Harm Reduction Bible

    We spoke to Dominic Milton Trott about 'The Honest Drugs Book'. What does a person who has taken 140 different drugs look like? I didn't know what to expect before Skyping Dominic Milton Trott, author of The Honest Drugs Book – but really, his...
  • Cannabinoids passed through breast milk

    If you're breastfeeding, you shouldn't be using marijuana. While that's long been the stance of the American Academy of Pediatrics, it's now supported by science. Researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine released...
  1. USA - Drug overdose epidemic has been growing exponentially for decades

    Death rates from drug overdoses in the US have been on an exponential growth curve that began at least 15 years before the mid-1990s surge in opioid prescribing, suggesting that overdose death rates may continue along this same historical growth trajectory for years to come. These findings suggest that, to be successful, prevention efforts must extend beyond control of specific drugs to address deeper factors driving the epidemic. Death rates from drug overdoses in the U.S. have been on an...
  2. The undersea and the ecstasy: MDMA leaves octopuses loved up

    Normally antisocial sea creature becomes friendly and tactile after being given the drug, scientists say What happens when you give an octopus MDMA? It sounds like a question that might flit through the meandering mind of someone who had been dabbling in psychedelics. But now the matter has become the focus of an unlikely-sounding scientific experiment to uncover the ancient origins of social behaviour. By showing that the normally antisocial sea creature became friendly and tactile after...
  3. New Zealand to pay out millions after thousands wrongly evicted for drug use

    Overzealous meth testing regime unnecessarily made some public housing tenants homeless Thousands of public housing tenants in New Zealand will receive millions of dollars in compensation and an apology from the government for being wrongly evicted after incorrect meth testing of their homes. Under the previous government, Housing New Zealand (HNZ) ended more than 800 tenancies on the basis that the houses could be contaminated because methamphetamine had been cooked or smoked on the...
  4. South Africa's highest court legalises cannabis use

    Africa's highest court has legalised the use of cannabis by adults in private places. Pro-marijuana activists cheered in the public gallery and chanted "Weed are free now" when the Constitutional Court gave its landmark ruling. In a unanimous ruling, judges also legalised the growing of marijuana for private consumption. South Africa's government had opposed its legalisation, arguing the drug was "harmful" to people's health. It has not yet commented on the ruling, which is binding....
  5. Fact or Fiction: Can You Really Sweat Out Toxins?

    There are plenty of good reasons to work up a sweat. Detoxifying your body isn’t one of them. Sweating is a bodily function that used to be taboo, with women in particular being told they don’t sweat, they glow. But look at any fashion magazine or beauty blog today, and you’ll find that sweat is in style. From infrared saunas to hot yoga, towel-soaking activities are being touted not only as relaxation tools, but also as ways to stay healthy by flushing out toxins. Too bad you can’t sweat...
  6. This Man Took 140 Drugs and Wrote a Harm Reduction Bible

    We spoke to Dominic Milton Trott about 'The Honest Drugs Book'. What does a person who has taken 140 different drugs look like? I didn't know what to expect before Skyping Dominic Milton Trott, author of The Honest Drugs Book – but really, his appearance shouldn't come as a surprise: a man in his fifties with a round, avuncular face and a warm Mancunian accent. Bald pate with funky ponytail tickling the nape of his neck and a hippy shark's tooth necklace hanging just below his Adam's...
  7. Scientists take big step toward finding non-addictive painkiller

    Coastal Plains Toad (Incilius nebulifer)CREDIT: DYP With the support of the National Institute on Drug Abuse, scientists at Wake Forest School of Medicine have been working to find a safe, non-addictive pain killer to help fight the current opioid crisis in this country. And they may have done just that, though in an animal model. Known as AT-121, the new chemical compound has dual therapeutic action that suppressed the addictive effects of opioids and produced morphine-like analgesic...
  8. Psychedelic drugs promote neural plasticity in rats and flies

    This figure shows the effects of three psychedelics and one control (VEH) on cortical neurons. CREDIT:Ly et al.Psychedelic drugs may have mind-altering powers in the physical sense, too. A new study, published June 12 in the journal Cell Reports, found psychedelics, specifically DOI, DMT, and LSD, can change brain cells in rats and flies, making neurons more likely to branch out and connect with one another. The work supports the theory that psychedelics could help to fight depression,...
  9. Secret tunnels discovered between the skull and the brain

    Study suggests immune cells rush through channels to get to injured tissue quickly Bone marrow, the spongy tissue inside most of our bones, produces red blood cells as well as immune cells that help fight off infections and heal injuries. According to a new study of mice and humans, tiny tunnels run from skull bone marrow to the lining of the brain and may provide a direct route for immune cells responding to injuries caused by stroke and other brain disorders. The study was funded in part...
  10. Alison Mau: Kiwi innovation can make us world-leaders in medicinal cannabis

    Ralph Ballinger sounds like such a good bloke, the in real old-school Kiwi sense of the term. A hero in World War II, he was aboard the one ship that survived the Luftwaffe's first major assault, at the Battle of Crete, and was then drafted to the Cambridge Agricultural Institute to help develop plants to feed the British people. He protested that although he had an agricultural degree, he didn't know much about creating seed stock. They just told him to get on with it, and that he did....
  11. Cannabinoids passed through breast milk

    If you're breastfeeding, you shouldn't be using marijuana. While that's long been the stance of the American Academy of Pediatrics, it's now supported by science. Researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine released a groundbreaking study this month showing that cannabinoids — the active compounds, including THC, found in cannabis — can pass through a mother's body and into her breast milk for up to six days after her last reported use. The study tested breast...
  12. Quarter of students know someone at university who they believe is an alcoholic, survey finds

    'The old perception of students as hard-boozing party animals may now be a dated one' Students are worried that their peers might be alcoholics, survey finds ( Getty ) One in four students know someone at university who they believe is an alcoholic, according to a new poll. Despite concerns that their classmates are dependent on alcohol, the majority (52 per cent) of students said they did not get drunk on a typical week, according to the YouGov research. The survey, of more than 1,000...
  13. USA - 'Every dollar he touched was used for drugs': Couple accused of stealing some of $400,000

    A couple accused of stealing some of the $400,000 the public raised for a homeless man insist they were simply trying to stop him wasting it all on drugs. Johnny Bobbitt, 35, made headlines around the world in November after he used his last money on gas for New Jersey woman Kate McClure. McClure and her boyfriend Mark D'Amico set up GoFundMe page dedicated to changing Bobbitt's life and it attracted hundreds of thousands of donations. But nine months on, the couple admit just over...
  14. Could garlic be the answer to beating antibiotic resistance?

    Scientists hope they have solved the growing threat of human resistance to antibiotics by reproducing a compound found in garlic. The compound ajoene has been created in a laboratory for the first time, raising hopes it could now be manufactured at low cost and on a large scale. Antibiotic resistance has been labelled one of the most urgent threats to public health by medical professionals. They fear a rise in drug-resistant super bugs could become a reality, caused by an overuse of...
  15. Featured

    UK calls for extra six weeks of Brexit drug stockpiles

    LONDON (Reuters) - The British government called on Thursday for drugmakers to build an additional six weeks of medicines stockpiles to cope with potential supply disruption in the event of a no-deal Brexit - a target the industry said would be challenging. FILE PHOTO: Used blister packets that contained medicines, tablets and pills are seen, in this picture taken June 30, 2018. REUTERS/Russell Boyce/Illustration/File Photo In a letter to pharmaceutical companies, the government asked...
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