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  1. Colorado Cracks A Billion In Annual Marijuana Sales In Record Time, Generating $200M In Tax Revenue

    Marijuana sales in Colorado exceeded $1 billion as of August of this year, with tax revenue from those sales coming in at $200 million, according to a report from the Colorado Department of Revenue and its Marijuana Enforcement Division. It’s the earliest point in any of the four years Colorado has had legal recreational marijuana that combined medical and rec sales have cracked the billion-dollar mark. Total combined recreational and medical marijuana sales through August hit...
  2. Everybody Loves Weed, Midterms Suggest

    A lot was at stake in the 2018 midterm election, including weed. Though the issue of legalization didn't dominate campaigns to the extent that healthcare, immigration, and flat-out racism did, cannabis continued to crawl toward full legalization. Even though 58 percent of Americans support legal cannabis, it's still prohibited on a federal level. A lack of action from Congress has led individual states to gradually phase out prohibition, and that trend continued on Tuesday. Marijuana...
  3. Flooding The World With Psychiatric Drugs Could Boost The Burden of Mental Disorders

    To reduce the rising burden of mental disorders around the world, the Lancet Commission on Global Mental Health and Sustainable Development has declared a need to increase psychiatric services globally, which should include an effort to “reduce the cost and improve the supply of effective psychotropic drugs for mental, neurological, and substance use disorders.” While reducing the burden of mental disorders is certainly a laudable goal, we believe that implementing this plan will increase...
  4. Psychiatrist Over-Medicated Hundreds of Children In His Care

    Unlike many doctors, Albuquerque psychiatrist Edwin Bacon Hall, 74, accepted patients on Medicaid and saw them in a timely manner. He often treated foster children, who were sent his way with the approval of their legal guardian, the Children Youth and Families Department (CYFD). On at least one occasion in his office, he prescribed drugs while dressed as a clown. But what really drew attention was his habit of handing out pills. “Hall has been a scourge of child psychiatry, and people...
  5. "Agitated" Patients Enrolled In Clinical Trials Without Consent Given Ketamine And Antipsychotics

    A Minneapolis hospital tested powerful antipsychotics and the potent anesthetic ketamine on emergency room patients without their knowledge or consent, violating regulations on human research, federal inspectors have determined. Based on those findings, a health watchdog group on Monday urged federal regulators to suspend all clinical trials at the hospital. In a letter to the Food and Drug Administration and the Department of Health and Human Services office that protects human research...
  6. Psilocybin Granted Breakthrough Therapy Status By FDA For Treatment-Resistant Depression

    In an extraordinary step forward for the psychedelic drug research community, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has just given psilocybin therapy for treatment-resistant depression a Breakthrough Therapy designation. This classification suggests the treatment has demonstrated significant potential in early clinical evidence, allowing the FDA to assist and expedite subsequent development and review processes. The FDA's Breakthrough Therapy designation was created in 2012 as a way of...
  7. How psychedelic therapies are making a comeback

    Psychedelic drugs have long been outlawed. Now psychiatrists want to bring them back. Dyani Lewis reports. On a sweltering New York evening in August 2016, Jesse Noakes finally found relief from years of mind-numbing depression. As he sat on the sofa facing the therapist his gloom melted away, replaced by feelings of clarity, warmth and enthusiasm. “It was magical,” he says, “something that I was so, so desperate for.” The Australian writer had spent his 20s cycling from one...
  8. Why psychedelics could be the new class of antidepressant

    Growing evidence suggests that hallucinogenic drugs can help quell depression. Following the government’s review of medicinal cannabis last month, Jack Dutton asks whether we are at a turning point in drug policy. In a lab in Basel in April 1943, Swiss scientist Albert Hofmann accidentally touched his hand with his mouth while he was synthesising a chemical intended to stimulate respiration and the nervous system. After ingesting the drug, he realised he had made something far more potent:...
  9. “Magic Mushrooms” May Be an FDA-Approved Drug for Anxiety and Depression in the Near Future

    It may have taken decades, but we’ve finally arrived at a place where marijuana is medically prescribed in about 29 states and Washington, D.C., and used often and everywhere. Cannabis—at the gym, in your morning smoothie and your lip balm—is becoming more mainstream by the day. So naturally, many wonder: What’s next? According to researchers at Johns Hopkins, it’s psilocybin, also known as the hallucinogen found in “magic mushrooms.” And with good reason: The team there has been studying...
  10. Harvard Study: Big Pharma, US Gov. Behind Opioid Epidemic

    A new Harvard study reveals how Big Pharma and federal government have colluded to allow the current opioid epidemic in the United States. The study, entitled The Opioid Epidemic: Fixing a Broken Pharmaceutical Market, describes how the American public have been duped by the elites for more than 20 years. “In this article, we argue that non-rigorous patenting standards and ineffectual policing of both fraudulent marketing and anticompetitive actions played an important role in launching...
  11. The FDA and Adulterated Supplements—Dereliction of Duty

    The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) plays an essential role in ensuring the safety of vitamins, minerals, botanicals, probiotics, amino acids, and glandular extracts sold as dietary supplements in the United States. While the FDA does not assess the safety of supplements prior to market, the agency is tasked with identifying and removing adulterated and hazardous supplements from the marketplace.  ⸻  Credit: ShutterstockAdulteration of dietary supplements typically involves 1 of 2...
  12. That Sign Telling You How Fast You’re Driving May Be Spying On You

    The next time you drive past one of those road signs with a digital readout showing how fast you’re going, don’t simply assume it’s there to remind you not to speed. It may actually be capturing your license plate data. According to recently released US federal contracting data, the Drug Enforcement Administration will be expanding the footprint of its nationwide surveillance network with the purchase of “multiple” trailer-mounted speed displays “to be retrofitted as mobile LPR [License...
  13. Two-Thirds Of Schizophrenia Patients Do Not Remit On Antipsychotics

    A new analysis of antipsychotic treatment of schizophrenia (published in Schizophrenia Bulletin) has found that two-thirds of patients treated this way do not experience symptom remission. Additionally, one in five did not experience any improvement at all. The research was led by Myrto Samara, Adriani Nikolakopoulou, Georgia Salanti, and Stefan Leucht, working through the Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine (ISPM) at the University of Bern, Switzerland. The authors note that...
  14. Review: Antidepressant Withdrawal Is Common, Potentially Severe And Long-Lasting

    New research by Dr. James Davies and Dr. John Read compares the results of a systematic review of the incidence, duration, and severity of antidepressant withdrawal with current clinical guidelines in the US and the UK. The researchers found that more than half of antidepressant users experienced withdrawal and that, in nearly half of these cases, effects were severe. Their results contradict existing clinical guidelines, which regularly claim that antidepressant withdrawal is typically mild...
  15. Researchers: Psilocybin Should Be Reclassified As A Schedule IV Controlled Substance

    In an evaluation of the safety and abuse research on the drug in hallucinogenic mushrooms, Johns Hopkins researchers suggest that if it clears phase III clinical trials, psilocybin should be re-categorized from a schedule I drug -- one with no known medical potential -- to a schedule IV drug such as prescription sleep aids, but with tighter control. The researchers summarize their analysis in the October print issue of Neuropharmacology. "We want to initiate the conversation now as to how...
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