Health

  1. Habitual coffee drinkers really do wake up and smell the coffee

    Regular coffee drinkers can sniff out even tiny amounts of coffee and are faster at recognising the aroma, compared to non-coffee drinkers, new research has found. Habitual coffee drinkers are not just more sensitive to the odour of coffee and faster to identify it, but the more they craved coffee, the better their ability to smell it became. It is the first time evidence has been found to prove coffee addicts are more sensitive to the smell of coffee. The results could open the door to...
  2. Drug use by state-2019 stats

    Drug abuse has a long and storied history in the United States, and we’ve been “at war” with it since 1971 under the Nixon administration. But no matter who is in office, the federal drug budget continues to increase. It’s moved from $23.8 billion in 2013 to over $27.7 billion in 2018. The current administration seems to be taking a hardline approach to drug use. In addition to the issue of drugs crossing the border from Mexico, President Donald Trump has been focused especially on the...
  3. Study: Half of Schizophrenia Diagnoses May Be Wrong

    In a small study of patients referred to the Johns Hopkins Early Psychosis Intervention Clinic (EPIC), Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report that about half the people referred to the clinic with a schizophrenia diagnosis didn't actually have schizophrenia. Schizophrenia is a chronic, severe and disabling disorder marked by disordered thinking, feelings and behavior. People who reported hearing voices or having anxiety were the ones more likely to be misdiagnosed. In a report of the...
  4. Cannabis-based medicine may reduce seizures for children with difficult-to-treat epilepsy

    Taking a pharmaceutical formulation of cannabidiol, a cannabis-based medicine, cut seizures nearly in half for children with a rare and severe type of epilepsy called Dravet syndrome, according to a phase 3 study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 71st Annual Meeting in Philadelphia, May 4 to 10, 2019. Dravet syndrome, which starts in infancy, can lead to intellectual disability and frequent, prolonged seizures. Cannabidiol is derived from marijuana...
  5. Prescription drugs pregabalin and gabapentin have been reclassified – but it won’t stop problem use

    Gabapentin and pregabalin, two widely used prescription drugs, are now subject to increased controls in the UK, which means they are now reclassified as class C controlled substances. These drugs are licensed to treat epilepsy, anxiety, peripheral and neuropathic pain (pain caused by damage or injury to the nerves), but they are known to produce feelings of euphoria, calmness and relaxation. It is this mixed profile of effects that has contributed to their wide use. But these drugs can...
  6. Pharmacies won't fill doctor's prescriptions!

    Doctor said pharmacies aren't filling his prescriptions 4/26/2019 6:45 PM SANDUSKY — A Sandusky doctor said local pharmacies run by three large corporations are refusing to fill his prescriptions of pain pills for chronic pain patients. Dr. Bill Bauer, who concentrates his practice on pain relief and has criticized policies that abruptly cut off pain patients from their medicine, said Walmart, Rite Aid and CVS made no attempt to research individual patients’ history. “They’re turning...
  7. Imperial College launches world’s first Centre for Psychedelics Research

    The first formal centre for psychedelic research in the world will launch at Imperial College London today. Funded by more than £3 million from five founding donors, the new Imperial Centre for Psychedelic Research will build on over a decade of pioneering work in this area carried out at Imperial, including a clinical trial that has kick-started global efforts to develop psilocybin therapy into a licensed treatment for depression. It will also investigate their potential for treating other...
  8. CDC Study Shows Kratom-Linked Overdose Deaths

    The botanical substance kratom may be emerging as a small but dangerous piece of the nation's ongoing drug crisis, a new analysis shows. Made from a plant native to Southeast Asia, kratom can be used as a stimulant in low doses, while at higher doses it can act as a depressant and painkiller. It's often sold at corner stores, smoke shops or online and has become increasingly popular in the U.S. in recent years, although federal agencies consider kratom a drug of concern and research on its...
  9. High-strength cannabis increases risk of mental health problems

    Study says 30% of first-time psychotic disorders in south London linked to strong drugs. Frequent cannabis use and high-strength varieties are likely to increase the chance of mental health problems among users, according to researchers behind the largest study of its kind. Experts have previously flagged a link between cannabis use and psychosis, particularly among vulnerable people with heavy use of the drug. Now research suggests the potency of the cannabis is also important, with...
  10. Unwashed poppy seeds under fire on Capitol Hill and around the world

    A man who has been seeking changes to U.S. law since his son died from morphine intoxication in 2016 expects to see bills filed in April. His son wasn’t using drugs. It was unwashed poppy seeds, bought on Amazon.com and brewed as tea, that killed him. The draft legislation expected to be introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives and Senate in early April. It would establish the definition of unwashed poppy seeds as “poppy seeds that have not been processed to adequately remove poppy...
  11. FDA approves esketamine, the first major depression treatment to reach U.S. market in decades

    The Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday approved esketamine, the first major depression treatment to hit the U.S. market in decades and a new option for patients who haven’t responded to existing therapies. Esketamine — developed by Johnson & Johnson and delivered as a nasal spray — was tested in combination with oral antidepressants in patients with what’s known as treatment-resistant depression. The drug is related to ketamine, a common anesthetic that’s sometimes misused...
  12. Discovery finds link between the brain and the immune system

    Discovery Finds Link Between the Brain and the Immune System In a stunning discovery made by the University of Virginia’s School of Medicine, researchers have overturned decades of textbook teaching by determining that there is a direct correlation between the brain and the immune system. For years scientists have been trying to correlate the relationship between the two, yet they lacked the evidence to show how our thoughts and feelings (or neurochemistry) could affect our overall health....
  13. UK: buprenorphine problems appear. Prices rising.

    A 700% spike in the price of a drug used to wean addicts off heroin has caused alarm among treatment agencies, which warn of a rise in drug-related deaths unless urgent action is taken to make it more affordable. Buprenorphine is an alternative to methadone that reduces the symptoms of withdrawal and lessens the desire to use heroin. It is estimated that more than 30,000 people in England use the drug, which offers a reduced risk of overdose compared with methadone. Earlier this year it...
  14. Boredom is egos largest enemy

    Boredom is egos largest enemy. Why? Try it yourself: sit in lotus posture if possible for about 10 minutes and focus only on your breath. You might feel it under your nostrals or in the back of the nose, maybe in your throat or all the way down to your lungs and belly. As long as you follow your breath with gentle precision. Sooner or later you will notice that you were distracted by thoughts, feelings, sensations, emotions, pain, anxiety, noises etc. When you realise this, gently...
  15. MDMA users more empathetic than other drug users

    Long-term MDMA users have higher levels of empathy than cannabis and other drugs users, new research suggests. University of Exeter scientists compared the empathy levels of 25 people who used multiple drugs including MDMA, 19 people who used multiple drugs not including MDMA and 23 people who used alcohol only. Users of MDMA reported feeling much more empathy – and were better at identifying the emotions of others on a computer task – than people who took multiple drugs not including...
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