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  • Scientists take big step toward finding non-addictive painkiller

    Coastal Plains Toad (Incilius nebulifer)CREDIT: DYP With the support of the National Institute on Drug Abuse, scientists at Wake Forest School of Medicine have been working to find a safe, non-addictive pain killer to help fight the current...
  • Fact or Fiction: Can You Really Sweat Out Toxins?

    There are plenty of good reasons to work up a sweat. Detoxifying your body isn’t one of them. Sweating is a bodily function that used to be taboo, with women in particular being told they don’t sweat, they glow. But look at any fashion magazine...
  • Could garlic be the answer to beating antibiotic resistance?

    Scientists hope they have solved the growing threat of human resistance to antibiotics by reproducing a compound found in garlic. The compound ajoene has been created in a laboratory for the first time, raising hopes it could now be manufactured...
  • Psychedelic drugs promote neural plasticity in rats and flies

    This figure shows the effects of three psychedelics and one control (VEH) on cortical neurons. CREDIT:Ly et al.Psychedelic drugs may have mind-altering powers in the physical sense, too. A new study, published June 12 in the journal Cell...
  • Cannabinoids passed through breast milk

    If you're breastfeeding, you shouldn't be using marijuana. While that's long been the stance of the American Academy of Pediatrics, it's now supported by science. Researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine released...
  • No alcohol safe to drink, global study confirms

    Bad news for those who enjoy what they think is a healthy glass of wine a day. A large new global study published in the Lancet has confirmed previous research which has shown that there is no safe level of alcohol consumption. The researchers...
  • Drinking alcohol may make prostate cancer more aggressive

    Men who are diagnosed with prostate cancer, who also have a history of heavy drinking may be more likely to have an aggressive tumor, according to new research. A small study from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, found that men who...
  1. Fact or Fiction: Can You Really Sweat Out Toxins?

    There are plenty of good reasons to work up a sweat. Detoxifying your body isn’t one of them. Sweating is a bodily function that used to be taboo, with women in particular being told they don’t sweat, they glow. But look at any fashion magazine or beauty blog today, and you’ll find that sweat is in style. From infrared saunas to hot yoga, towel-soaking activities are being touted not only as relaxation tools, but also as ways to stay healthy by flushing out toxins. Too bad you can’t sweat...
  2. Scientists take big step toward finding non-addictive painkiller

    Coastal Plains Toad (Incilius nebulifer)CREDIT: DYP With the support of the National Institute on Drug Abuse, scientists at Wake Forest School of Medicine have been working to find a safe, non-addictive pain killer to help fight the current opioid crisis in this country. And they may have done just that, though in an animal model. Known as AT-121, the new chemical compound has dual therapeutic action that suppressed the addictive effects of opioids and produced morphine-like analgesic...
  3. Psychedelic drugs promote neural plasticity in rats and flies

    This figure shows the effects of three psychedelics and one control (VEH) on cortical neurons. CREDIT:Ly et al.Psychedelic drugs may have mind-altering powers in the physical sense, too. A new study, published June 12 in the journal Cell Reports, found psychedelics, specifically DOI, DMT, and LSD, can change brain cells in rats and flies, making neurons more likely to branch out and connect with one another. The work supports the theory that psychedelics could help to fight depression,...
  4. Cannabinoids passed through breast milk

    If you're breastfeeding, you shouldn't be using marijuana. While that's long been the stance of the American Academy of Pediatrics, it's now supported by science. Researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine released a groundbreaking study this month showing that cannabinoids — the active compounds, including THC, found in cannabis — can pass through a mother's body and into her breast milk for up to six days after her last reported use. The study tested breast...
  5. Could garlic be the answer to beating antibiotic resistance?

    Scientists hope they have solved the growing threat of human resistance to antibiotics by reproducing a compound found in garlic. The compound ajoene has been created in a laboratory for the first time, raising hopes it could now be manufactured at low cost and on a large scale. Antibiotic resistance has been labelled one of the most urgent threats to public health by medical professionals. They fear a rise in drug-resistant super bugs could become a reality, caused by an overuse of...
  6. No alcohol safe to drink, global study confirms

    Bad news for those who enjoy what they think is a healthy glass of wine a day. A large new global study published in the Lancet has confirmed previous research which has shown that there is no safe level of alcohol consumption. The researchers admit moderate drinking may protect against heart disease but found that the risk of cancer and other diseases outweighs these protections. A study author said its findings were the most significant to date because of the range of factors...
  7. Drinking alcohol may make prostate cancer more aggressive

    Men who are diagnosed with prostate cancer, who also have a history of heavy drinking may be more likely to have an aggressive tumor, according to new research. A small study from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, found that men who had a history of drinking seven or more alcoholic beverages per week had a threefold increased risk of having a high-grade tumor, according to results published on Thursday in Cancer Prevention Research. The researchers discovered that these...
  8. Density of outlets selling alcohol ‘linked to hospital admission rates’

    Hospital admissions for alcohol-related emergency care and chronic illness are significantly higher in areas with the most pubs, bars and clubs, research has found. The density of restaurants and other outlets selling alcohol was also linked to admission rates in England, according to the study published in journal Addiction. Authorities have been urged to consider the impact of local licensing decisions on hospitals in light of the research. Researchers from the University of Sheffield...
  9. Opioid Addiction at Delivery Quadrupled Among Pregnant Moms

    In the past 25 years, the number of cases of women had an opioid use disorder at the time of delivery has spiked. The number of pregnant women who have an opioid addiction at the time of delivery has skyrocketed in recent years, with devastating consequences for mothers and their babies. New data released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Thursday found that four times as many women presented at delivery with an opioid abuse disorder in 2014 than in 1999, from 1.5 per...
  10. Dozens overdose in Connecticut park near Yale

    Police have made three arrests after more than 70 people overdosed in a Connecticut city. Some 52 of the 71 overdoses happened on New Haven's downtown green, next to Yale University's campus, said Fire Chief John Alston. The first three overdoses were reported on Tuesday night and the tally steadily rose throughout Wednesday, officials said. New Haven officials said the substance was K2, a synthetic cannabinoid. The incident comes in the wake of a new report that found a record 72,000...
  11. Why cannabis relieves Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) symptoms

    New research, published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, reveals the molecular mechanism that explains why cannabis could help treat inflammatory bowel disease. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is an umbrella term that describes inflammatory conditions affecting the gastrointestinal tract, such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. In the United States, approximately 1.6 million people are living with such disorders. Almost 70,000 new cases are diagnosed each year. The...
  12. Norway to give hundreds of addicts free heroin 'to improve quality of life'

    Norway will trial an experimental scheme to provide drug addicts with free heroin in a bid to combat the country’s overdose epidemic. The government announced that the Norwegian Directorate for Health and Social Affairs was asked to propose a program that would improve the quality of life for those struggling with substance abuse. Health Minister Bente Hoie said in a statement posted to Facebook that they hoped the initiative would “provide a solution that will give... a better quality of...
  13. New Research Suggests Brain Abnormalities In ‘Schizophrenia’ May Be Caused By Antipsychotics

    A new study published in Biological Psychiatry finds that the reduced cortical thickness and brain surface area are correlated with a schizophrenia diagnosis but that these differences may be explained by the widespread use of antipsychotic medications. The researchers report that “effect sizes were two to three times larger in individuals receiving antipsychotic medication relative to unmedicated individuals.” In fact, the researchers found that participants with a schizophrenia...
  14. Report: N.Y. Docs Who Got Paid Were More Likely To Prescribe Opioids

    A new study found that New York doctors who received speaking fees, gifts and meals from the makers of addictive opioid drugs in 2014 and 2015 prescribed more opioids than their peers who did not receive anything. The study, published Tuesday by the private New York State Health Foundation, is the first-ever statewide look at the financial entanglements between physicians and opioid manufacturers — entanglements that many say were and still are a contributing factor to the nation's deadly...
  15. Despite The Evidence, Overprescription of Stimulants Continues

    A new study, published online in Therapeutics Initiative, finds that despite published, replicated evidence that the youngest children in any given classroom are overdiagnosed with ADHD and overprescribed stimulants, prescribing rates for children in British Columbia have continued to increase. The Therapeutics Initiative is an organization in British Columbia, Canada, that is funded by the government through a grant to the University of BC. Their mandate is to update clinicians and...
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