Justice & Law

Popular Articles

  1. Denver, Colorado Might Decriminalize Psychedelic Mushrooms As Soon As May 2019

    DENVER, Colo. – If Denver For Psilocybin canvassers can gather 4,726 signatures in the Mile High City by January 7th, a voter initiated ballot measure to legalize “magic mushrooms” as they’re colloquially called will be put to a citywide vote in May of 2019. If the measure makes it onto the ballot and receives enough votes to become law, the Denver Psilocybin Mushroom Decriminalization Initiative would make the possession, consumption, and cultivation of psilocybin mushrooms for adults over...
  2. Colorado Cracks A Billion In Annual Marijuana Sales In Record Time, Generating $200M In Tax Revenue

    Marijuana sales in Colorado exceeded $1 billion as of August of this year, with tax revenue from those sales coming in at $200 million, according to a report from the Colorado Department of Revenue and its Marijuana Enforcement Division. It’s the earliest point in any of the four years Colorado has had legal recreational marijuana that combined medical and rec sales have cracked the billion-dollar mark. Total combined recreational and medical marijuana sales through August hit...
  3. “Magic Mushrooms” May Be an FDA-Approved Drug for Anxiety and Depression in the Near Future

    It may have taken decades, but we’ve finally arrived at a place where marijuana is medically prescribed in about 29 states and Washington, D.C., and used often and everywhere. Cannabis—at the gym, in your morning smoothie and your lip balm—is becoming more mainstream by the day. So naturally, many wonder: What’s next? According to researchers at Johns Hopkins, it’s psilocybin, also known as the hallucinogen found in “magic mushrooms.” And with good reason: The team there has been studying...
  4. Harvard Study: Big Pharma, US Gov. Behind Opioid Epidemic

    A new Harvard study reveals how Big Pharma and federal government have colluded to allow the current opioid epidemic in the United States. The study, entitled The Opioid Epidemic: Fixing a Broken Pharmaceutical Market, describes how the American public have been duped by the elites for more than 20 years. “In this article, we argue that non-rigorous patenting standards and ineffectual policing of both fraudulent marketing and anticompetitive actions played an important role in launching...
  5. That Sign Telling You How Fast You’re Driving May Be Spying On You

    The next time you drive past one of those road signs with a digital readout showing how fast you’re going, don’t simply assume it’s there to remind you not to speed. It may actually be capturing your license plate data. According to recently released US federal contracting data, the Drug Enforcement Administration will be expanding the footprint of its nationwide surveillance network with the purchase of “multiple” trailer-mounted speed displays “to be retrofitted as mobile LPR [License...
  6. Researchers: Psilocybin Should Be Reclassified As A Schedule IV Controlled Substance

    In an evaluation of the safety and abuse research on the drug in hallucinogenic mushrooms, Johns Hopkins researchers suggest that if it clears phase III clinical trials, psilocybin should be re-categorized from a schedule I drug -- one with no known medical potential -- to a schedule IV drug such as prescription sleep aids, but with tighter control. The researchers summarize their analysis in the October print issue of Neuropharmacology. "We want to initiate the conversation now as to how...
  7. South Africa's highest court legalises cannabis use

    Africa's highest court has legalised the use of cannabis by adults in private places. Pro-marijuana activists cheered in the public gallery and chanted "Weed are free now" when the Constitutional Court gave its landmark ruling. In a unanimous ruling, judges also legalised the growing of marijuana for private consumption. South Africa's government had opposed its legalisation, arguing the drug was "harmful" to people's health. It has not yet commented on the ruling, which is binding....
  8. Siblings jailed for supplying meth linked to 90 Mile Beach boat

    Two siblings have been jailed for supplying methamphetamine linked to a boat that washed up on 90 Mile Beach. Riki and Chevonne Wellington. Photo: RNZ / Anneke Smith A jury found Riki and Chevonne Wellington guilty of possessing methamphetamine for supply and supplying the class A drug in a High Court at Auckland last month. This morning Justice Matthew Palmer jailed Mr Wellington for 13 years and Ms Wellington for seven. They transported around 1.5 kilograms of methamphetamine each...
  9. Party till 4am as Glasgow plans licence law reform

    Nightclubs in Glasgow may be permitted to stay open until 4am under new licensing laws in an attempt to make the city feel “more European”. The city is running a pilot scheme to extend club opening hours until 4am that would bring it in line with other European countries (photo: ALAMY)The Glasgow Licensing Board (GLB) suggested venues with a gold status won through an accreditation scheme could apply for extended opening hours up to 10 times a year. Clubs could also stay open later if they...
  10. Nebraska carries out America's first execution using opioid fentanyl

    entanyl – which has central role in America’s overdose epidemic – used to kill Carey Dean Moore despite widespread objections Carey Dean Moore, who was on death row for 38 years over the killing of two cab drivers in 1979, was put to death on Tuesday. Nebraska has carried out the first execution in the US using fentanyl, the opioid painkiller that killed Prince and has a central role in America’s overdose epidemic. The state put Carey Dean Moore, a double murderer, to death on Tuesday...
  11. Nebraska set to become first US state to use fentanyl in execution

    Federal appeals court gives go ahead for execution on Tuesday on grounds it is the ‘will of the people’ The first execution in the US using the opioid drug fentanyl is expected to take place on Tuesday after a federal appeals court rejected a German pharmaceutical company’s move to block the killing. The court gave the go ahead on Monday for Nebraska to put to death Carey Dean Moore on the grounds it is the “will of the people”. Moore has been on death row for four decades for the 1979...
  12. Traumatized Teenagers Are Drugged Without Consent At Immigrant Shelters

    Fleeing an abusive stepfather in El Salvador, Gabriela headed for Oakland, California, where her grandfather had promised to take her in. When the teenager reached the U.S. border in January 2017, she was brought to a federally funded shelter in Texas. Initially, staff described her as receptive and resilient. But as she was shuttled from one Texas shelter to another, she became increasingly depressed. Without consulting her grandfather, or her mother in El Salvador, shelter staff have...
  13. States move to ban fake urine, a new challenge for drug testing amid an abuse epidemic

    As part of a routine drug test, Adam Randall handed a vial of yellow liquid to a probation officer. Although it looked like a urine sample from the 31-year-old — who was required to submit to testing after a previous conviction — authorities in Queensbury, N.Y., say it was not. They allege that Randall turned over a synthetic liquid he had sneaked into the probation office via a bottle stuffed into his pants, a substance so in demand that states are now taking steps to ban it: fake pee....
  14. Featured

    INCB presents plan for innovative Darknet & NPS action at G-7 expert meeting.

    Washington D.C. / Vienna, 14 June 2018 - Mr. Rossen Popov, Deputy Secretary of the Board, represented the International Narcotics Control Board at the G-7 ad-hoc expert meeting on innovative responses to the challenges posed by synthetic drugs, held in Washington D.C. on 13 June 2018. The discussion centered on the unique nature of the challenges presented by trafficking in and abuse of synthetic opioids, including fentanyl analogues, and on finding new multilateral tools to address these...
  15. Russian drug kingpin Alexandre Sitnikov arrested

    Viktor Ivanov, the head of The Federal Drug Control Service of the Russian Federation (FDCS), met diplomats from 46 countries and gave them information about drug dealers. Names and addresses of these criminals were identified during special operation “Mosaic”. The list includes 1,500 names, 1,180 are citizens of the USA. According to LEA the criminal community consisted of about 10,000 participants. Three Russian citizens were the websites’ admins, managing drugs trafficking. Opening of...
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