Miscellaneous

  1. New Zealand to pay out millions after thousands wrongly evicted for drug use

    Overzealous meth testing regime unnecessarily made some public housing tenants homeless Thousands of public housing tenants in New Zealand will receive millions of dollars in compensation and an apology from the government for being wrongly evicted after incorrect meth testing of their homes. Under the previous government, Housing New Zealand (HNZ) ended more than 800 tenancies on the basis that the houses could be contaminated because methamphetamine had been cooked or smoked on the...
  2. Secret tunnels discovered between the skull and the brain

    Study suggests immune cells rush through channels to get to injured tissue quickly Bone marrow, the spongy tissue inside most of our bones, produces red blood cells as well as immune cells that help fight off infections and heal injuries. According to a new study of mice and humans, tiny tunnels run from skull bone marrow to the lining of the brain and may provide a direct route for immune cells responding to injuries caused by stroke and other brain disorders. The study was funded in part...
  3. Alison Mau: Kiwi innovation can make us world-leaders in medicinal cannabis

    Ralph Ballinger sounds like such a good bloke, the in real old-school Kiwi sense of the term. A hero in World War II, he was aboard the one ship that survived the Luftwaffe's first major assault, at the Battle of Crete, and was then drafted to the Cambridge Agricultural Institute to help develop plants to feed the British people. He protested that although he had an agricultural degree, he didn't know much about creating seed stock. They just told him to get on with it, and that he did....
  4. USA - 'Every dollar he touched was used for drugs': Couple accused of stealing some of $400,000

    A couple accused of stealing some of the $400,000 the public raised for a homeless man insist they were simply trying to stop him wasting it all on drugs. Johnny Bobbitt, 35, made headlines around the world in November after he used his last money on gas for New Jersey woman Kate McClure. McClure and her boyfriend Mark D'Amico set up GoFundMe page dedicated to changing Bobbitt's life and it attracted hundreds of thousands of donations. But nine months on, the couple admit just over...
  5. Oklahoma Medicaid tests new tactic to curb U.S. drug costs

    LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - A new front in the battle over the cost of expensive medicines in the United States is opening up in Oklahoma, the first state where the government’s Medicaid program is negotiating contracts for prescription drugs based on how well they work. FILE PHOTO: The Oklahoma State Capitol is seen in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, U.S., September 30, 2015. REUTERS/Jon Herskovitz/File Photo In June, Oklahoma received approval from the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid...
  6. Tackling drug resistance on Asian farms with apps and a dictionary

    ROME (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - In his first 12 years working as a vet in Bangladesh, Bikash Chandra Saha routinely prescribed antibiotics. Then he learned of the devastating impact of antimicrobial resistance on human health - and it revolutionized his treatment choices. The growing resistance of deadly diseases to antimicrobial drugs such as antibiotics is seen as one of the biggest threats to human health, but awareness of the dangers of overuse remains low, particularly in...
  7. What Do Blind People 'See' When They Take LSD?

    The consciousness-altering drug LSD is best known for its bizarre visual effects: even a small dose of the drug can turn the flat walls of your living room into something out of Wonderland. Objects bend, colors blend and intricate patterns cast a shimmer on everything you see. But what would LSD feel like if you couldn't see? In an unusual case report published in the April issue of the journal Cognition and Consciousness, a blind 70-year-old former rock musician has some answers. [Read the...
  8. Kellyanne Conway on avoiding opioids: Eat the ice cream, have the french fries

    Kellyanne Conway — rumored to be the next White House communications director — drew a strong reaction on social media with a joke about drug use at a forum for millennials. Introducing Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar and the Department of Justice’s Sarah Isgur Flores, Conway discussed fentanyl, a synthetic opioid that is significantly more potent than heroin. “On our college campuses, your folks are reading the labels, won’t put any sugar in their body, they don’t eat carbs...
  9. People are using heavy duty bug sprays to get high and it's really dangerous

    INDIANAPOLIS -- In a state where drug overdoses continue to rise, people are finding new ways to get high and emergency crews are warning about one of the latest dangerous trends: bug spray. Indianapolis firefighters are making several runs a day because of the toxic concoction that's known as KD. To create the high, people are using "heavy duty" bug sprays like RAID and Wasp that have high concentrations of Pyrethroids and spraying them on other drugs like marijuana, spice and tobacco...
  10. Doctor Issues Warning Over Dangerous And Deadly Masturbation - But Don't Worry, It's Safe If You Don

    Gone are the days of masturbation being viewed as a shameful act linked to madness, disease, and general nastiness. Nowadays, even the most prudish of medical professionals would agree masturbation has numerous health benefits. That said, there is harmless fun and then there are downright dangerous delights. Speaking to the German daily newspaper Bild, forensic physician Dr Herald Voss warned that between 80 and 100 people in Germany die each year from their risky masturbation practices....
  11. (ARCHIVE) U.S. to Resume Using Paraquat on Marijuana

    DF author's note: This archived article from 30 years ago highlights some of the tactics used by the US Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) and the lengths gone to in the government's efforts in the war on drugs, which at the time were societally seen as acceptable and even desirable. Note: one of the chemicals mentioned in the article, glyphosate, is the main component of the now-controversial herbicide RoundUp, produced by Monsanto. WASHINGTON, July 13— The director of the Drug...
  12. How labels like ‘addict’ and ‘junkie’ mask class contempt for drug users

    Terms such as “drug user”, “addict” or the blatantly pejorative “junkie”, “dope head” or “stoner”, are loaded with moral bias. They suggest that people who consume psychoactive substances are mentally weak and dangerous – when in fact chemically altering the mind (the natural drive for “intoxication”) has long been a part of human biology and culture, most of which does not lead to any harm or crime. A recent report by the Global Commission on Drug Policy (GCDP) – a group of drug policy...
  13. Nazis Took ‘Meth’ Pills To Stay Alert, Boost Endurance During World War II, Letters Reveal

    In an attempt to fuel its youthful but increasingly exhausted fighting force during World War II, the Nazis reportedly turned to addictive and potentially dangerous substances, including a form of what is known today as the illegal drug methamphetamine, currently a rising problem in Europe. This narcotic-fueled side of the Nazi war effort is illuminated in letters sent home by Nazi soldiers such as Heinrich Boll, a famous German author awarded the Nobel Prize for literature in 1972. While...
  14. I Got a 'Brain Reboot Infusion', the £500 Injection That Can Supposedly Change Your World

    NAD+ therapy can supposedly increase your energy, focus and metabolism, improve your cardiovascular health and help you detox from drink and drugs. All this, of course, sounds incredibly unlikely – so I thought I'd see for myself. It's good to be skeptical about wonder drugs, because often there's nothing wonderful about them at all. So when a finance worker friend of mine told me he'd discovered a miracle treatment that gives him a huge advantage over his colleagues, I was dubious. "No –...
  15. Youth workers warn of rise in drugs purchases through social media

    Dealers use sites such as Instagram and Snapchat to reach young people, prompting calls for education on risks Growing numbers of teenagers are buying illegal drugs on social media sites such as Instagram and Snapchat, experts have said. Youth workers have raised concern about the trend, which they say has accelerated in the last year and a half. One said he had spoken to children as young as 13 who had bought drugs through such sites. “In the last 18 months we have gone from this way of...
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