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Chicago bans sale of pot-flavored candies

  1. PenguinPhreak
    <b style="font-size: 14px;">CHICAGO, Illinois (AP) -- The City
    Council passed a law Wednesday banning the sale of marijuana-flavored
    lollipops, gumdrops and other treats, becoming the first major city to
    prohibit the confections that have appeared in convenience stores
    nationwide.[/b]


    The candies are legal because they are made with
    hemp oil, an ingredient used in health foods and some household
    products. The oil imparts marijuana's grassy taste but not the high.


    "I
    can't imagine the degree and the extent to which people will go to make
    a buck -- and to make a buck on kids, trying to get them to experiment
    with something that is going to be a lead-in to the use of marijuana,"
    said Alderman Edward Burke, who sponsored the measure.


    Chicago is
    not the only city weighing the issue. A New York City councilwoman
    plans to hold hearings on the candies this summer, and an Atlanta
    suburb passed a resolution opposing them, which caused merchants there
    to remove the treats from their shelves.


    In Chicago, stores
    selling the candy will face fines up to $500 and possible suspension or
    revocation of their business licenses.


    The candies are sold under
    names such as Purple Haze and Rasta. Companies that manufacture the
    products say the candies are geared toward adults and that they advise
    retailers to sell only to people 18 and older.


    "This is an adult
    product. I don't intend and I don't want kids to eat it," said Tony Van
    Pelt, president of one manufacturer, Chronic Candy. "There are 78
    million pot smokers out there (in the United States) ... That's who I'm
    going after."


    Van Pelt said he is considering legal action because a product with legal ingredients is being declared off-limits in Chicago.


    "I think this is crazy. There is nothing illegal about it. Freedom of choice is being attacked," he said.

Comments

  1. GreyApple
    Wow thats bull shit theres no THC in the candy theres nothing illeagal about it and its not like marijuana flaverd candy taste very good TO KIDS AT LEAST o well
  2. Woodman
    GreyApple,

    You're missing the point.

    It's a "gateway" candy that lead kids into eating
    sweeter and more fattening candies.
  3. Sick Jack
    There is a good article on cannabisculture.ca concerning the ban of canna lollipops.

    The article's main argument is that if canna lollipops can influence young people to taste marijuana, what about CocaCola or Coke, the well-known beverage ? It's name still indicates that in the past the product contained cocaine extracts..........
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