1. Dear Drugs-Forum readers: We are a small non-profit that runs one of the most read drug information & addiction help websites in the world. We serve over 4 million readers per month, and have costs like all popular websites: servers, hosting, licenses and software. To protect our independence we do not run ads. We take no government funds. We run on donations which average $25. If everyone reading this would donate $5 then this fund raiser would be done in an hour. If Drugs-Forum is useful to you, take one minute to keep it online another year by donating whatever you can today. Donations are currently not sufficient to pay our bills and keep the site up. Your help is most welcome. Thank you.
    PLEASE HELP
  1. buseman
    HIGHLY dangerous batches of cocaine and ecstasy pills have hit the Australian market, with drug experts and police warning they had been bulked up with pesticides and lethal chemicals.

    An international drug conference heard a worldwide shortage of MDMA had led drug manufacturers to turn to other chemicals to keep up the supply of ecstasy pills.

    The same is occurring on Sydney's streets, with police detecting dangerous chemicals such as the de-worming pesticide levamisole - deemed too dangerous for human consumption.

    At the same time, cocaine use was spiking. Drug squad head Detective Superintendent Nick Bingham said officers were arresting greater numbers of people for possessing the drug. It, too, was being been "cut" with chemicals.

    Overseas testing had shown that toxic chemical MCPP was being used in cocaine to bulk it out.

    The chemical is used to induce severe migraines and headaches to test the efficacy of medications.

    It is very, very dangerous because people don't know what's in the drugs, Supt Bingham said.

    He said the social acceptance of cocaine among Sydney society was causing concern.

    We have certainly seen a spike in seizures and arrests of cocaine, Supt Bingham said.

    It's the first time we have seen cocaine seizures significantly overtake heroin, although it is still a small population of the overall drug seizures.

    [But] there's a hidden user group ... that we don't necessarily see and who don't generally come into contact with police or commit a crime apart from possessing and using cocaine.

    There are calls to set up a warning system, with drug experts believing it could save lives.

    National Drug and Alcohol and Research and training director Paul Dillon has returned from the international drug conference in Zurich, where many of the countries attending have a system in place to test drugs and warn users of their content.

    If we want to be serious about prevention, the more information we give users, research shows they change their behaviour, he said.


    By Kate Sikora
    July 12, 2010
    http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/na...son-in-australia/story-e6frf7l6-1225890529649

Comments

  1. User-126494
    Part scare tactics of the government, part truth, part the failure of international drug policy and part the black market.

    Way to go War on Drugs, making sure everyone is safe… :thumbsdown:
  2. mickey_bee
    Exactly. By any interpretation, a shortage in the worldwide supply of MDMA would be seen as a good thing, a success, by those backing the 'war on drugs/people'.
    Yet, as this shows, all it means in reality, is that the drugs being sold as MDMA become significantly more cut - meaning just as many people are buying 'ecstasy', yet getting significantly more dangerous substances.

    To any logical thinker, this is an obvious result of there being a shortage of an illegal product - of course the demand still exists, and of course the black market dealers are unregulated, - so of course they'll continue to pump out often dangerously cut product.:applause:

    It's a shame there are so many illogical, overly idealistic decision-makers in the world, who will need real-life examples like this, -and many of them- to visibly show them the adverse effects of prohibition.
  3. User-126494
    Yes, but also in terms of pure economics, it drives the prices up, makes it more profitable for both sides who keep escalating into a never-ending spiral.

    The "War on Drugs" will never be won, it's un-winnable, and way to profitable for everyone involved, no matter which side of the "War" you are on. The profitability is in keeping it un-winnable, for all sides.

    Catch-22
  4. godztear
    So scare tactics? I would have to lean towards yes on this one.

    However the presence of levamisole has been highly documented here on Drugs Forum for it's use in cocaine. This is no scare tactic, but disturbing information.

    http://www.drugs-forum.com/forum/showthread.php?t=126657&highlight=levamisole
    http://www.drugs-forum.com/forum/showthread.php?t=132051&highlight=levamisole

    That's just for starters. Using the search feature provided by Drugs Forum, anyone who is interested furter in this topic can research accordingly by searching for levamisole.
To make a comment simply sign up and become a member!