1. Dear Drugs-Forum readers: We are a small non-profit that runs one of the most read drug information & addiction help websites in the world. We serve over 4 million readers per month, and have costs like all popular websites: servers, hosting, licenses and software. To protect our independence we do not run ads. We take no government funds. We run on donations which average $25. If everyone reading this would donate $5 then this fund raiser would be done in an hour. If Drugs-Forum is useful to you, take one minute to keep it online another year by donating whatever you can today. Donations are currently not sufficient to pay our bills and keep the site up. Your help is most welcome. Thank you.
    PLEASE HELP
  1. chillinwill
    There may be nothing like the real thing, but some industrious marijuana users have seized on an obscure but easily accessible substance that mimics the drug's effects on the brain — creating a popular trade in legal dope that has stymied law enforcement authorities.

    The users are buying a product known as K2 — or "Spice," Genie" and "Zohai" — that is commonly sold in head shops as incense. Produced in China and Korea, the mixture of herbs and spices is sprayed with a synthetic compound chemically similar to THC, the psychoactive ingredient in marijuana. Users roll it up in joints or inhale it from pipes, just like the real thing.

    Though banned in most of Europe, K2's key ingredients are not regulated in the United States — a gap that has prompted lawmakers in Missouri and Kansas to consider new legislation.

    "This isn't Jerry Garcia's marijuana," said state Rep. Jeff Roorda, a Democrat from the eastern Missouri town of Barnhart. "They've used chemicals to avoid creating something that's already illegal."

    Authorities in Johnson County, Kan., discovered ex-convicts on probation smoking K2, and said it is spreading to high school students.

    "This has become extremely popular," said Linda Weber, owner of The Vise smoke shop in the St. Louis suburb of St. Peters, who said she only sells to adults.

    She said she sells about 60 packages a week, with suppliers calling her weekly to pitch new brands. She said she's keeping an eye on what state lawmakers decide, though, because "I definitely don't want to be selling it if it comes out that it's harmful."

    K2 costs between $20 and $50 for three grams — similar to the street price of marijuana — but with the key advantages of being legal and undetectable in drug tests.

    The key ingredients are believed to be the unintended result of scientific research on marijuana's effects.

    Dr. John Huffman, a Clemson University organic chemistry professor, was researching the effects of cannabinoids on the brain when his work resulted in a 1995 paper that contained the method and ingredients used to make the compound. That recipe found its way to marijuana users, who replicated Huffman's work and began spraying it onto dried flowers, herbs and tobacco.

    "People who use it are idiots," said Huffman, referring to K2 smokers.

    A proposed bill in Missouri would make possession a felony punishable by up to seven years in prison — identical to punishments given to users of real marijuana. A similar bill in Kansas would make possession a misdemeanor punishable, with up to a year in jail and a $2,500 fine, also the same as marijuana convictions.

    The products are sold widely, but authorities in other states contacted by The Associated Press, including Pennsylvania, California and Michigan, said they haven't heard of their use as a drug.

    Police in Missouri and Kansas said they've become aware of K2 in recent weeks.

    In the rural southern Missouri city of West Plains, K2 is sold in a head shop just blocks from the high school. A botched attempt by teens to steal K2 from the shop brought the substance to the attention of police.

    "A 10-year-old child could walk into a head shop and buy it," said West Plains Detective Shawn Rhoads. "It's not a tobacco, it's not regulated by anything. It would be like sending my 10-year-old son into Wal-Mart to buy potpourri."

    Although it is legal, the military has banned possession of K2. The federal Drug Enforcement Administration has classified it a "drug or chemical of concern."

    Conner Moore, 20, who is taking a semester off from Moberly Community College, said he and his friends started smoking K2 after reading online news articles and postings about the substance. He compares the high to smoking medical marijuana. The high, he says, is shorter.

    "We just got on forums and looked it up and saw what other people said about it," he said. "Obviously if it comes out being bad, I'll obviously stop using it," Moore said. "There's really no sites out there that says what is in K2."

    There is no data on the drug's toxicity or how long it stays in the body. In mice, it can lead to a lower body temperature, partial paralysis and the temporary inability to feel pain, according to the DEA.

    One of the few studies of the compound's use was performed by the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction, a Portugal-based agency of the European Union, in November 2009. The study found the amount of synthetic compound varies widely between brands, and that despite being widely available, it isn't clear how many Europeans use it.

    Allen St. Pierre, executive director of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws, said K2 isn't much discussed within marijuana culture. "If government is genuinely concerned about controlling cannabis-related products, there is really only one thing that seems to have an effect: a tax stamp," St. Pierre said.

    By SARAH D. WIRE
    Associated Press
    February 17, 2010
    http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5hhrocWpopbwneo54MKsW25e2gxDgD9DU50QG1

Comments

  1. Laszlo1
    Harsh words from Dr. Huffman, haha.
    It is a little spooky to swim that K2 is just a solution that is sprayed onto flowers herbs and tobacco though, and how no where are ingredients stated. But then, swim smokes cigarettes, so the pot is calling the greyish kettle black.
  2. gonegrowin
    This stuff would never have caught on had marijuana been legal and drug tests not existed. There would be no need, and it doesnt last as long. It is essentially a product created and marketed primarily because of existing drugs laws. Not to say that people wouldnt embrace it if cannabis was legal, but certainly not to this extent. They can ban this, and some other chemical will come around. This is the age we live in.
  3. happa331
    SWIM agrees with the previous post. that this so called problem wouldnt be a problem if cannabis was legal.

    also in SWIMs opinion, the clock is ticking down on the legality of the blends in the US. There have been a rash of articles to come out recently. which from what SWIM understands happened in the UK before the ban.

    SWIM finds it interesting that the article that 10 year olds were caught tryign to steal the blend. they are really laying the ground work that this stuff is bad and corrupts.

    unfortunately, instead of doing research into the toxicity, and benefits of the JWH and CP canabinoids.

    It reminds SWIM back in the early 90s how GBH quickly became illegal once the media caught on and then the politricksters needed to act, or risk being seen as weak on the so called WAR ON DRUGS.
  4. gonegrowin
    You got it wrong dude, teens tried to rob the place, of unknown age. The cop is the one who who said the thing about his ten year old son-

    "A 10-year-old child could walk into a head shop and buy it," said West Plains Detective Shawn Rhoads. "It's not a tobacco, it's not regulated by anything. It would be like sending my 10-year-old son into Wal-Mart to buy potpourri."

    This statement, i think, is complete bullshit. Every head shop i have walked into has ID'd me very quickly after entering. Im pretty sure no head shops are going to let a 10 year walk in, let alone buy something. x2 if its a porn/headshop. So i would have to say, no, a 10 year old could not walk in and buy it. And comparing that to your 10 year old son being sent to walmart to buy potpourri? That is just stupid. 1. 10years olds cant drive. I doubt many people walk to walmart. 2. Why the fuck would you send your 10 year old to buy stuff for you, let alone potpourri. 3. Potpourri doesnt get you baked. What a stupid analogy. Man. I am getting way too worked up right now. LE says some really dumb shit to get the public on their side.
  5. happa331
    By bad on that one. but it did say teens,

    in SWIMs case, most headshops usually have a sign outside
    saying no one under 18 allowed.

    SWIM does agree, they are trying to stir things up and portray the worst
    side. It will corrupt our youth. an argument that has been used against porn, movies, drugs, comics, the list goes on...
  6. Flying Mind
    SWIM likes how specifically it's "bad".

    "Imitation pot as bad as the real thing"

    Since when is pot bad... Oh yea, that's right, almost forgot, this is America (still). Can't wait for that California vote thingy.

    Crosses fingers! Common legal pot!
  7. gonegrowin
    Legal pot would be great, but there is still the federal system and they are sure to fuck things up and be dickheads. Also, what about drugs tests for employment and probation? Would THC metabolites be removed from such tests? I would say that these tests, along with the legality issue and avoiding any convictions or arrests, are a big reason that people have embraced the synthetic cannibinoids. If its legal, but i cant smoke it because i may get fired, then that doesnt quite strike my fancy as much, and i bet a lot of people have the same thoughts.
  8. Flying Mind
    ^^ True, true. Manny concerns arise. But SWIM thinks its a gradual " general population mind changing" process that must be initiated (and already has). If Cali can get it legal/regulated it's likely other states will envy the tax money profits and follow in step. It's all about making baby steps.

    Yes. Partly why SWIM did try it w/ pure JWH-018. Went through two grams but just quit it because he doesn't fully trust there is no long-term adverse effects. He also bought about 5 different 3g (synthetic containing chemical) blends. He's done with all that now though... Just can't get passed the idea it was made in some random unregulated "lab" (or someone's bathtub).


    SWIM keeps thinking someday, he'll be like 80, and be able to find some "buds" next to the Bud Light :)
  9. noAverageJoe
    As bad as the real thing. That's just hylarious. LoL

    Yeah it is real nice and all that the media keeps bashing everything they dislike, but the only information one should trust, is the one the comes from independant research facilities. Not the media. They research nothing. They just blabber-mouth a lot.

    Swim means c'mon, look at the title:

    "Cops: ...".

    What the hell do cops know? They do not even question the orders they get?

    Surely swim agrees about the fact that they are reseach chemicals and have little to no history of use / abuse. Yeah, so maybe they should be banned. Maybe not.

    But the ultimate, and coming solution is decriminalising the original!
    When people are allowed to smoke the medicinal herb at will, then there is no need for these unknows substances anymore :)

    Cannabis is here to stay baby.
  10. lts1
    The funny thing is that the politicians who introduced these legislative bills both in Missouri and Kansas to make JWH018 & JWH073 a felony are from the Republican Party. These lousy F&*%#n Republicans continue to screw up the country with all these archaic, over conservative laws and regulations.
  11. Universal Expat
    From all I have read legalization in swims lifetime in the USA is a give-in. Products like these wouldnt even see the light of day if the real deal was legal.

    As far as long term effects concerned, from what I have read it was discovered in a lab and did go through some human testing. Then again I havent seen the actual research papers.
  12. chillinwill
    Fake pot that acts real stymies law enforcement

    K2 made of obscure but easily accessible substance that isn't yet regulated

    [IMGR="white"]http://www.drugs-forum.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=13305&stc=1&d=1266588368[/IMGR]
    There may be nothing like the real thing, but some industrious marijuana users have seized on an obscure but easily accessible substance that mimics the drug's effects on the brain —creating a popular trade in legal dope that has stymied law enforcement authorities.

    The users are buying a product known as K2 — or "Spice," Genie" and "Zohai" — that is commonly sold in headshops as incense. Produced in China and Korea, the mixture of herbs and spices is sprayed with a synthetic compound chemically similar to THC, the psychoactive ingredient in marijuana. Users roll it up in joints or inhale it from pipes, just like the real thing.

    Though banned in most of Europe, K2's key ingredients are not regulated in the United States — a gap that has prompted lawmakers in Missouri and Kansas to consider new legislation.

    "This isn't Jerry Garcia's marijuana," said state Rep. Jeff Roorda, a Democrat from the eastern Missouri town of Barnhart. "They've used chemicals to avoid creating something that's already illegal."

    Authorities in Johnson County, Kan., discovered ex-convicts on probation smoking K2, and said it is spreading to high school students.

    "This has become extremely popular," said Linda Weber, owner of The Vise smoke shop in the St. Louis suburb of St. Peters, who said she only sells to adults.

    She said she sells about 60 packages a week, with suppliers calling her weekly to pitch new brands. She said she's keeping an eye on what state lawmakers decide, though, because "I definitely don't want to be selling it if it comes out that it's harmful."

    K2 costs between $20 and $50 for three grams — similar to the street price of marijuana — but with the key advantages of bring legal and undetectable in drug tests.

    The key ingredients are believed to be the unintended result of scientific research on marijuana's effects.

    Dr. John Huffman, a Clemson University organic chemistry professor, was researching the effects of cannabinoids on the brain when his work resulted in a 1995 paper that contained the method and ingredients used to make the compound. That recipe found its way to marijuana users, who replicated Huffman's work and began spraying it onto dried flowers, herbs and tobacco.

    "People who use it are idiots," said Huffman, referring to K2 smokers.

    Proposed bill would make possession a felony
    A proposed bill in Missouri would make possession a felony punishable by up to seven years in prison — identical to punishments given to users of real marijuana. A similar bill in Kansas would make possession a misdemeanor punishable, with up to a year in jail and a $2,500 fine, also the same as marijuana convictions.

    The products are sold widely, but authorities in other states contacted by The Associated Press, including Pennsylvania, California and Michigan, said they haven't heard of their use as a drug.

    Police in Missouri and Kansas said they've become aware of K2 in recent weeks.

    In the rural southern Missouri city of West Plains, K2 is sold in a head shop just blocks from the high school. A botched attempt by teens to steal K2 from the shop brought the substance to the attention of police.

    "A 10-year-old child could walk into a head shop and buy it," said West Plains Detective Shawn Rhoads. "It's not a tobacco, it's not regulated by anything. It would be like sending my 10-year-old son into Wal-Mart to buy potpourri."

    Although it is legal, the military has banned possession of K2. The federal Drug Enforcement Administration has classified it a "drug or chemical of concern.

    No research of drugs toxicity
    Conner Moore, 20, who is taking a semester off from Moberly Community College, said he and his friends started smoking K2 after reading online news articles and postings about the substance. He compares the high to smoking medical marijuana. The high, he says, is shorter.

    "We just got on forums and looked it up and saw what other people said about it," he said. "Obviously if it comes out being bad, I'll obviously stop using it," Moore said. "There's really no sites out there that says what is in K2."

    There is no data on the drug's toxicity or how long it stays in the body. In mice, it can lead to a lower body temperature, partial paralysis and the temporary inability to feel pain, according to the DEA.

    One of the few studies of the compound's use was performed by the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction, a Portugal-based agency of the European Union, in November 2009. The study found the amount of synthetic compound varies widely between brands, and that despite being widely available, it isn't clear how many Europeans use it.

    Allen St. Pierre, executive director of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws, said K2 isn't much discussed within marijuana culture. "If government is genuinely concerned about controlling cannabis-related products, there is really only one thing that seems to have an effect: a tax stamp," St. Pierre said.

    February 17, 2010
    MSNBC
    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/35444158/ns/health-addictions/?GT1=43001
  13. anonuser30500
    You know what's in cigarettes, but nobody could reel off the list as its so long. You are addicted to them bro as am I. The horrifying thing is that they are designed to be addictive and Swim worries that others will follow this lead and creates drugs that are designed to hook you in.

    Also, tobacco companies can be held complicit when it comes to ill health. Not so with the manufacturers of K2, or the manufacturers of whatever synthetic cannabis was sprayed onto what could be herbs pulled from some toxic dump for all we know.

    Swim would say the cops are right on this one. Synthetic cannabis has to be worse than the real thing and you need to be a scientist with access to sophisticated equipment to even dream about churning out some for your own use.
  14. moda00
    Me either. But I have heard some of these substances were synthed and researched by the pharmaceutical industry, which does not surprise me. Interested to see more data...
To make a comment simply sign up and become a member!