1. Dear Drugs-Forum readers: We are a small non-profit that runs one of the most read drug information & addiction help websites in the world. We serve over 4 million readers per month, and have costs like all popular websites: servers, hosting, licenses and software. To protect our independence we do not run ads. We take no government funds. We run on donations which average $25. If everyone reading this would donate $5 then this fund raiser would be done in an hour. If Drugs-Forum is useful to you, take one minute to keep it online another year by donating whatever you can today. Donations are currently not sufficient to pay our bills and keep the site up. Your help is most welcome. Thank you.
    PLEASE HELP
  1. Terrapinzflyer
    Govt moves to restrict party pill drug


    The government is moving to restrict sales of DMAA, an ingredient in a new generation of party pills.

    Associate Minister of Health Peter Dunne says the Expert Advisory Committee on Drugs (EACD) has considered the risk posed by 1,3 dimethylamylamine DMAA and advised it be scheduled as a restricted substance.

    The scheduling will mean a prohibition on:

    - selling or supplying DMAA to anyone under 18 years of age

    - advertising DMAA

    - offering it as a gift or reward

    DMAA is the replacement pill for BZP after it was banned 18 months ago, and is marketed as a safer alternative to alcohol and hard drugs.

    Products containing DMAA will now have to meet strict labelling and packaging requirements.

    Dunne says he has also asked the Ministry of Health to look at legislation prohibiting the sale of large quantities of the pure chemical form of DMAA.

    This will outlaw the sale of the substance, in any form other than as a tablet or capsule.

    The Ministry will also consult the "party pill" industry on controls on the maximum dose of DMAA per tablet or capsule.

    Dunne says the Ministry is working with other government agencies on the underlying policy and regulatory issues that needs to be worked through before DMAA can be scheduled as a restricted substance.

    "I am releasing the advice of the EACD now to warn consumers of the known risks of this substance and to place the "party pill" industry on notice that strict controls around products containing DMAA will be forthcoming," says Dunne.

    DMAA has been linked with hospitalisations in Australia, but not in New Zealand as yet, with Saturday's announcement coming as a pre-emptive strike.

    Party pill makers pleased

    Party pill makers say they are pleased with the tightening of rules on the "new generation" pills.

    Social Tonics Association spokesman Matt Bowden says it is something the manufacturers have been campaigning for.

    He says tight regulation of the products makes much more sense than trying to ban them outright.

    The party pill industry says that, if anything, the controls do not go far enough. They also want restrictions on the amount of DMAA per pill - a 75 milligram maximum.

    "With BZP we never had dosage limits, the pills were too strong and some people got sick. Let's put dosage limits in place quickly this time," Bowden says.


    Published: 3:26PM Saturday November 07, 2009
    Source: NZPA/Newstalk ZB/ONE News


    http://tvnz.co.nz/health-news/govt-moves-restrict-party-pill-drug-3117890

Comments

  1. chillinwill
    Party pills restrictions just too late

    Anti-drug campaigners are welcoming yesterday's announcement of new restrictions on the sale of legal party pills, but say the Government should have acted at least a year ago.

    Drug Foundation president Ross Bell said he was pleased dimethylamylamine (DMAA) was being classified as restricted under the Misuse of Drugs Act but said the move had "taken far too long".

    "We knew that as soon as BZP was banned the industry would have an alternative ready to go on the market," said Bell.

    "And that's what happened the day after the ban. These DMAA products hit the market and there was absolutely no controls over them.

    "I understand why health officials have to follow the process, but it's our view it could have been done a lot quicker."

    The Ministry of Health advised the Government's advisory committee on drugs to restrict DMAA late last year.

    That followed a voluntary recall of DMAA products in powder form after four Waikato users were admitted to hospital suffering serious side effects. The products remained on sale in pill form.

    DMAA is a stimulant derived from geranium plant oil and usually mixed with caffeine to make party pills. It is said to give the user an adrenalin rush, and hit the shelves after BZP-based substances were banned in April last year.

    At the start of this year, the industry estimated about 100,000 DMAA-based pills had been sold since the BZP ban.

    Associate Health Minister Peter Dunne has also indicated the Government will restrict the sale of DMAA to capsule and tablet form and that there will be strict labelling and packaging requirements. He was confident the new measures would be in place by early next year and that the industry would comply.

    But Bell is concerned the party pill industry will have a new product ready to get around the latest restrictions.

    Matt Bowden of party pill developer Stargate International dismissed Bell's concerns as "wild conjecture".

    Bowden welcomed the regulation of DMAA and said he would work with the Government to develop a maximum dose per tablet.

    By Alice Neville
    November 8, 2009
    New Zealand Herald
    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10607966
  2. starboy
    (here is my press release that the papers all chopped up and edited)





    New Party Pill Set To Rock.


    Release: Matt Bowden, Social Tonics Association
    Date: Saturday 7th November 2009

    Well known drug policy activist and rock musician Matt Bowden said that Associate Minister of Health Peter Dunne’s announcement to schedule natural energy pill ingredient DMAA as a Restricted Substance under the Misuse of Drugs Act was “welcome news.”

    “I developed these products and put them on the market over 18 months ago now to replace BZP and they have proven to be a safer alternative to alcohol, methamphetamine and the other drugs, the experts have recognised this and advised against making them illegal, instead placing regulations around them to make them safer, which is a win for industry, for consumers and for public safety.”

    “Peter Dunne has shown wisdom in listening to his experts this week, tight regulation gives society controls over the consumer market. The other option of banning would have handed control of the market to organised crime.” Mr Bowden identified a trend in scientific advisories the world over in recognising the failure of the so called “war on drugs” model and advising alternative, evidence based regulatory models.

    “Banning consumer drugs empowers a black market; conversely blanket legalisation of drugs would also be problematic, so the third option of tight regulation means a safer market for consumers, not a black market. It is the safest option.”

    The Restricted Substances category of the Misuse of Drugs Act allows for controls over how recreational consumer energy products like DMAA are manufactured, labelled, advertised and controls around dosage limits. Mr Bowden urged the Minister to prioritise dosage limits for DMAA.

    “What happened with BZP was that it was reasonably safe when taken as directed, but the last Minister never put dosage limits in place, and so a competitive industry suffered from dosage escalation problems and some people got sick. This time around we want to see dosage limits in place swiftly to stop that from happening. Let’s make the regulations work this time to keep consumers even safer. That would totally rock.”

    Mr Bowden said that local industry had suffered with the banning of BZP but it was encouraging to see scientists developing safer partying technology. “Let’s face it, alcohol is one of the most dangerous drugs out there to socialise with, so any improvements in recreational technology should be welcomed by all.” He commented that it was still a risky industry to be in. “Personally, I am focusing on producing progressive rock music to express my views these days, it is a long time since governments banned songs.”

    Matt’s progressive rock album is due for release in February 2010 and free samples can be downloaded from ...


    and then a link to my website url - matt bowden with dot com on the end, hope that is ok with rules.
  3. Benga
    Hi Matt, yes linking to your website is fine as long as there's no forum or direct (legal high related) sales / outlet in it.

    b
  4. Thirdedge
    DMAA set to be Regulated in New Zealand

    Saturday, 7 November 2009 - Media Release - Hon Peter Dunne - Associate Minister of Health

    Restrictions on new party pills forthcoming

    Associate Minister of Health Peter Dunne has accepted the advice of the Expert Advisory Committee on Drugs (EACD) on the substance 1,3-dimethylamylamine, commonly known as DMAA, the primary active ingredient in ‘new generation party pills.’

    “The EACD has considered the risk of harm posed by DMAA on three occasions and has advised me that this substance be scheduled as a restricted substance under the Misuse of Drugs Amendment Act 2005,” said Mr Dunne.

    “The scheduling of DMAA as a restricted substance will provide for stringent controls around so called ‘new generation party pills,’ including a prohibition on:
    • selling or supplying DMAA to anyone under 18 years of age;
    • advertising DMAA in the media;
    • offering DMAA as a gift or reward;
    • the sale and supply of DMAA from or within premises where alcohol is sold or from service stations;
    • the sale of DMAA from or within any premises where children or minors gather.”
    “There will also be strict labelling and packaging requirements for products containing DMAA.”
    “I am also concerned about the sale of large quantities of the pure chemical form of DMAA as the availability of the substance in this manner increases the risk of overdose. Accordingly, I have directed the Ministry of Health to progress further controls by regulation under the Misuse of Drugs Amendment Act 2005 that will prohibit the sale of synthetic restricted substances, such as DMAA, in any form other than as a tablet or capsule.”
    “I have directed the Ministry to consult with the ‘party pill’ industry regarding the plausibility of additional controls relating to a maximum dose of DMAA per tablet or capsule that could be mandated by law in due course.”

    “The Ministry of Health is currently working with other government agencies regarding underlying policy and regulatory issues that need to be worked through before the scheduling of DMAA as a restricted substance can be progressed.”
    “I am releasing the advice of the EACD now to warn consumers of the known risks of this substance and to place the ‘party pill’ industry on notice that strict controls around products containing DMAA will be forthcoming,” said Mr Dunne.

    ENDS
  5. Thirdedge
    Dunne's moves to control, not ban, new party pills welcomed

    By Adam Ray

    The Government has announced plans for tough new controls on the sale of party pills.

    Associate Health Minister Peter Dunne wants it to be illegal to sell pills containing the chemical DMAA to anyone under 18, and also says there will be strict rules around labeling and packaging.

    The new regulations will make it a lot harder to buy and sell party pills, but the industry is still welcoming them.

    "Not ideal for marketers, but ideal for consumers and for safety," says drug campaigner Matt Bowden.

    The Government has accepted advice to restrict the sale of DMAA, a substance derived from geranium oil which has become a popular ingredient in pills since the banning of BZP.

    Under the new rules it will be illegal to sell or supply DMAA to anyone under 18 or advertise it or offer it as a gift or reward. The rules will also ban its sale or supply from service stations or alcohol shops, or places where children gather.

    Mr Dunne also wants to lower the risk of overdosing by stopping DMAA being sold in large amounts, and wants plans put in place it is only available for sale as tablets or capsules.

    Mr Bowden says any moves to discourage overdosing are long overdue, and that officials should be commended for controlling the sale of DMAA rather than banning it.

    "If you ban something you lose control," says Mr Bowden. "It makes it more dangerous."

    The new rules will be finalized over the next few months and should be place sometime next year.

    Source: http://www.3news.co.nz/Dunnes-moves...abid/423/articleID/128669/cat/41/Default.aspx
  6. chillinwill
  7. Piglet
    1,3 dimethyl amyl amine? What is it supposed to do? It's chemically unlike anything I have thusfar come across...
  8. Terrapinzflyer
    would be curious to know if the government of Australia is talking about setting a dosage for this substance as a "party pill" or if for some other purpose entirely?

    Regardless, any substance that can be used to "get high" people will naturally push the limits of dosage, so would hope they will also be be researching potential adverse side effects.

    and hopefully any dosage limits set will be more explicit then "not to exceed xx in y amount of time"
  9. Benga
To make a comment simply sign up and become a member!