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  1. Beenthere2Hippie
    New legislation will allow police officers to test drivers for traces of drugs for the first time. Officers will no longer have to prove a driver was too impaired to drive – just that they had an illegal level of drugs in their system. The new drive – DrugWipe – allows police to test motorists for substances in less than 10 minutes using only a swab taken from inside a driver's cheek.

    DrugWipe allows officers to screen drivers for cannabis and cocaine at the roadside. The change in the law will make it quicker and easier for drug-drivers to be prosecuted. British motorists who get behind the wheel with illegal drugs – or illegal quantities of legal medication – in their system could face a year in prison and a fine of up to £5,000. In addition, police will be able to test for other drugs including ecstasy, LSD, ketamine and heroin at a police station, even if a driver passes the roadside check. The system has been under test in Surrey and Sussex – setting legal limits for blood levels of legal and illegal drugs.

    Inspector Stewart Goodwin, of Surrey and Sussex police, told Metro: "Drug-driving is a widespread but often hidden menace across the country.
    D"You don't have to be on illegal drugs to be unfit to drive - many prescription or over-the-counter drugs can also impair your ability to drive. In the same way that we take a zero tolerance approach to drink-driving, we will also not tolerate drug-driving. Driving under the influence of drugs puts not just the offenders and their passengers at risk but everyone else on the roads as well. We have officers out every day looking for drug-drivers but we also need the public's help to catch them and get them off the roads. If you know or suspect someone has taken drugs and is driving, please contact us urgently - it could save lives."

    Last month, an international study into cannabis found the drug was 114 times safer than drinking alcohol. The report found the Class B drug was "significantly" less harmful than alcohol. But the National Institute on Drug Abuse reports that drivers are three to seven times more likely to be responsible for the accident than drivers who had not used drugs or alcohol. The risk associated with marijuana in combination with alcohol appears to be greater than that for either drug by itself, it reports.




    By Aaron Brown/March 1, 2015
    http://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/561243/New-DrugWipe-Drug-Driving-Cannabis-Law-Britain-UK-Tomorrow
    Newshawk Crew

    Author Bio

    Beenthere2Hippie
    BT2H is a retired news editor and writer from the NYC area who, for health reasons, retired to a southern US state early, and where BT2H continues to write and to post drug-related news to DF.

Comments

  1. 5-HT2A
    This despite the negligible effects of cannabis on driving risks. What a shame. The U.K. continues their assault in civil liberties in the absence of evidence of real danger.

    They even admit intoxication is not the problem, only the presence of drugs in the system is necessary. Then they go on to say that they are fighting a "menace" when they are not held accountable for proving danger? Totally lacking in credibility. This clearly shifts blame onto the driver who is then forced to prove his innocence, which is out of balance with the burdens of the state as I see it.
  2. JonnyBGoode
    Re: EXPLAINED: The new Drug-Driving Law to hit UK tomorrow

    I would suggest ANYONE that has a problem or a habit smoking cannabis or has taken cocaine in the last week at least to get off the road immediately for the time being at least. These tests will show up a tiny amount of drugs so someone that smoked weed on Friday maybe testing up positive on Monday/Tuesday and if you are in drug treatment or you have a drug worker and have told them you have a problem with ANY drug particularly if you've given urine samples that confirm the presence of benzodiazeines they have A LEGAL DUTY to inform the DVLA so you may have your license revoked for up to a year and have to pass several screens from a DVLA doctor not your own.

    This next week they'll be making a massive example of everyone and also testing this new equipment out so expect a plethora of police stops, don't let it happen to you, stay off the road until you know you are safe from prosecution.
  3. JonnyBGoode
    I posted this in another thread:

    I would suggest ANYONE that has a problem or a habit smoking cannabis or has taken cocaine in the last week at least to get off the road immediately for the time being at least. These tests will show up a tiny amount of drugs so someone that smoked weed on Friday maybe testing up positive on Monday/Tuesday and if you are in drug treatment or you have a drug worker and have told them you have a problem with ANY drug particularly if you've given urine samples that confirm the presence of benzodiazeines they have A LEGAL DUTY to inform the DVLA so you may have your license revoked for up to a year and have to pass several screens from a DVLA doctor not your own.

    This next week they'll be making a massive example of everyone and also testing this new equipment out so expect a plethora of police stops, don't let it happen to you, stay off the road until you know you are safe from prosecution.

    The Police are not interested in road safety that's why they refuse to allow a person that tests positive for an illegal substance to take the "Fitness to Drive" test as they are not interested in people that may have traces of drugs in their system passing the safety test they just want to prosecute and persecute drug users, that's what this is all about not road safety or they would simply make sure everyone is fit to drive by making them do the standard test.
  4. soso
    Re: EXPLAINED: The new Drug-Driving Law to hit UK tomorrow

    Fuckin hell johny if everyone who had used drugs in the last week got off the road immediately Britain would grind to a halt, the roads would be empty and the economy would eventually crumble lol
  5. Petri6
    Re: EXPLAINED: The new Drug-Driving Law to hit UK tomorrow

    I hope to God that they at least test for THC and not some inactive metabolite of it as they do in my country (or at least you are quilty of a DWI in my country even if they detect only inactive metabolites in a subsequent blood test). However, although it is perfectly legal for a cop to pull you over and take a similiar sample in my country, the chances of actually being tested like that are quite slim unless you seem very out of it and give a negative breath analyzer for alcohol (unless they have a reason to check your police record and you have one for drug offences).
  6. JonnyBGoode
    Re: EXPLAINED: The new Drug-Driving Law to hit UK tomorrow

    The thing is though that the Police Forces which ARE agreeing to this testing method, and I think it's only greater manchester police that have refused so far, will be enforcing this rigourously this week. Also, the DVLA will by the end of the month have introduced legislation insisting that they are informed by any health workers or doctors that anyone on any medications on the banned list will be given to them so they can cross check who has a license and who is on meds. This is a fact, it's happening, and I would exercise a lot of caution especially in the opening two weeks of this legislation. It will pick up a small trace of cannabis and then you'll be blood tested and you will have not only your license revoked for a year but also maybe jail and a fine as well as killer insurance premiums when you come back off the ban.
  7. Kitts
    Re: EXPLAINED: The new Drug-Driving Law to hit UK tomorrow

    Ooh-ee Mama this is freaking me out. I don't drive a lot anyway. Hardly ever at all. But this seriously makes me just want to sell my car and opt out of the whole thing for a while. I'm only on a very low methadone reduction, but I don't like the whole can of worms this looks like it might open for us Brits. I thought I was over-reacting till I came here and read this.
  8. JonnyBGoode
    Re: EXPLAINED: The new Drug-Driving Law to hit UK tomorrow

    It's basically fine UNLESS you get pulled over and the Police decide to do a fitness to drive test but if you're in methadone maintenance unless you fall under the agreed limit which is set deliberately low the DVLA will have to be informed by your key worker if they know that you drive even occasionally.
  9. Diverboone
    Absurd, the presents of a drug or it's metabolite is not indicative of impairment. A positive drug test is evidence of prior use that's all. One time use of marijuana could place a driver at risk of being charged under this law as much as 2 weeks after the use and subjective effect are long gone. On what scientifically factual danger to the public is this law intended to address?

    The shear prosecution cost of enforcing such a law will most likely be greater than any hypothetical reduction in questionable risk.
  10. JonnyBGoode
    It's not a law that takes road safety into account it is merely lip service from the current Tory government to make an "anti drug user law" which appeals to their right wing voters. If they were genuinely tough on crime of tough on people breaking the law they would not have cut the Police budget meaning the UK has tens of thousands less Police on the streets. This is a law based entirely on flawed right wing ideology and not based on scientific evidence or impairment. They have deliberately set the lowest threshold possible for the test to reveal the presence of 'illegal drugs' so they can catch more drug users and prosecute or should I say persecute them for simply having consumed some drugs several days prior to driving with no impairment at all.
  11. davestate
    Just for reference, the new blood level cutoff for drugs:

    Found the new limits (blood levels):

    Prescribed drugs:

    amphetamine 250µg/L
    clonazepam 50µg/L
    diazepam 550µg/L
    flunitrazepam 300µg/L
    lorazepam 100µg/L
    methadone 500µg/L
    morphine 80µg/L
    oxazepam 300µg/L
    temazepam 1,000µg/L

    Illegal drugs:
    benzoylecgonine 50µg/L
    cocaine 10µg/L
    delta-9-tetrahydrocannibinol (cannabis) 2µg/L
    ketamine 20µg/L
    lysergic acid diethylamide 1µg/L
    methylamphetamine 10µg/L
    MDMA 10µg/L
    6-monoacetylmorphine (heroin) 5µg/L
  12. Paul Shroom1
    Thinks its unjust that they can implement this without making the test they use available for the public.
    And without any good information on times.

    How are you supposed to know when you can drive?
    providing a means to test your self would seem an essential part of a course of medication if you need to drive?

    Found the manufacture that they get the test from and on there web site there test states 10ug detection for cannabis testing on drugwipe® 6 S.? but cant fined any other measurement?

    so it seems that the swob is less accurate than the 2ug limit? effectively making the limit 10ug

    [​IMG]

    """For those interested in how long cannabis stays in your blood, for the purposes of DUI tests, check out this graphic. As you can see, after roughly two hours, most of the THC has gone, and certainly takes you below the legal levels of 2ng in the UK, or 5ng in Washington state.

    People tend to mistake THC presence for that of carboxy-THC, which THC gets converted to by the body (metabolite). The latter can stay in the system for weeks, but the former is something which is only present for a matter of hours, before the body converts it into carboxy-THC. Modern science can and does easily distinguish between the two.

    The reality is that after just a couple of hours, somebody who has consumed cannabis would most likely have less than the legal limit of 'THC' in their system. """"
  13. JonnyBGoode
    @Paul shroom1

    That's excellent info thanks a lot. The only thing is that the test is a saliva swab at the roadside, if you're submitted to a police station then it's better if they take blood as you have pointed out with your information THC doesn't stay in the blood for that long compared to urine which can detectable for much longer.

    If one were to be pulled over by the police and swab tested for cannabis, the important timing would be how long THC stays in your saliva as you would only be later blood tested at the police station if you had already been flagged up for the saliva swab, unless you were over the drink drive limit as well.

    From the research I have done it appears that THC will stay in your saliva for roughly 12 hours to be safe but perhaps longer in some cases. They say it starts to rapidly leave the body after 6 hours but it may not all be gone for 12 but it's very hard to know. Using mouth wash can apparently help and there are also people selling the saliva swab tests online for the same levels as the UK police are testing for so it is possible people can saliva test themselves for cannabis if they buy the swabs but at £10 a go they're expensive.

    The safest thing to do is obviously don't drive for at least a day but I think legally speaking after 12 hours you would probably pass the saliva swab and if you're taken into custody a blood test is less likely to reveal any drugs in your system than a urine test which will likely flag up various substances for longer including cannabis.
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