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  1. hookedonhelping
    God is descending on Minneapolis in the form of invisible spliffs and imaginary lines of coke.

    The Drunken Glory movement—spawned by events like the Florida Outpouring and Toronto Blessing in the 90s, at which people appeared to be inebriated and high purely off the power of God—is on the rise, as godly YouTube channels find innovative ways of reaching their younger audience.

    One of those channels, Red Letter Ministries, is run by former meth addict Brandon Barthrop. We went to Brandon's hometown of Minneapolis, which boasts the largest concentration of drug addicts and churches in America, to try to get high on the glory of God.

    Brandon and his posse of waifs, strays, and former addicts spend their days sniffing "diamond oil" and tripping out to the sound of Brandon's YouTube preaching. Christian EDM DJs down the road are going to raves and attempting to "heal" clubbers high on drugs, and mega-churches run by rehab charities like Teen Challenge are preaching the drunken glory to thousands.

    To watch the Vice documentary video click here.

    Soooo.. Joe? What do you guys think about this? If (and that is a monumentally HUGE "IF") it works, it would be the cheapest and safest way to rock your socks off!

    http://www.vice.com/Fringes/drunken-glory-full-length
    Hosted by VICE Staff Dec 11 2013

Comments

  1. Beenthere2Hippie
    I don't want to be rude on the subject of anyone's religious beliefs, but this group does not seem like any real form of religion at all. It's more an excuse for religion than anything else.

    They seem like confused young kids, like the hardcore hippies of the 60's, who grew up to be the businessmen of the 80's and 90's. It's probably a phase that most of them will grow out of. We can hope anyway.

    Now the older folks among them that are calling for happiness in spirituality are fine, as far as I can see. It's always a matter of degree with anything. Very interesting find.
  2. Cid Lysergic
    For some religion can be an alternative way to alter the mind such as meditation or yoga. I personally view it as a Psychedelic experience mostly though that is much easier to obtain by spendibg, oh lets say, $10, rather than concentrating your brain very hard for the non drug buzz. My preference though.
  3. kumar420
    interesting find, I find the logic behind it kind of ironic though. Instead of taking drugs to attain a state of euphoria, they work themselves into a religious frenzy and get the exact same neurotransmitters dumping the exact same chemicals as they had when they were using drugs, but without the downside of potential addiction (I guess in this sense the addiction is the religion?).
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