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  1. fnord
    http://edition.cnn.com/2008/CRIME/05/22/elderly.shootout.ap/index.html?iref=mpstoryview

Comments

  1. chillinwill
    Here is an update on this

    PLEA IN BOTCHED RAID ENDS FEDS' CASE

    Civil Rights Violated: Ex-Police Officer Could Be Imprisoned for 10 Years As a Result of Elderly Woman's '06 Death, Cover-Up.

    The federal investigation into the fatal shooting of 92-year-old Kathryn Johnston ended Thursday with the guilty plea of former Atlanta police Officer Arthur Bruce Tesler.

    Against the advice of his lawyer, Tesler pleaded guilty to conspiring to violate civil rights, resulting in the Nov. 21, 2006, death of Johnston at her Neal Street home.

    As part of a plea agreement, federal prosecutors will recommend a sentence of 10 years and one month in prison. Tesler, 42, is to be sentenced in February.

    Johnston's killing shocked the nation. It also rocked the Atlanta police force with revelations that officers faked warrants to make drug cases.

    "The killing of Kathryn Johnston by Atlanta police officers was a terrible and unnecessary tragedy," U.S. Attorney David Nahmias said. "We are glad that today's guilty plea brings another measure of justice to Ms. Johnston, her family and our community."

    The case prompted a revamping of the narcotics squad and extensive training, Nahmias added.

    The federal investigation is now over. The FBI will hand over a report to Atlanta police Chief Richard Pennington with recommendations that could lead to state prosecutions or administrative discipline of other officers, Nahmias said.

    Greg Jones, FBI special agent in charge, said both he and Nahmias were pleased the federal probe did not uncover "systemic corruption" throughout the Atlanta Police Department.

    Still, Jones said, he believed it was "inevitable" that misconduct by Atlanta narcotics officers taking illegal shortcuts to obtain warrants would result in a fatal shooting such as Johnston's.

    The federal probe already resulted in the guilty pleas of Jason R. Smith and Gregg Junnier, two of Tesler's partners the night of Johnston's death. Both pleaded guilty to a state charge of voluntary manslaughter and federal civil rights charges. They have yet to be sentenced.

    Tesler, who did not fire shots on the evening of Johnston's death, was stationed at the rear of the home when the shooting occurred.

    The fatal incident started out as a planned arrest of a drug dealer, with officers believing a kilogram of cocaine was inside Johnston's home.

    The officers lied to a judge, smashed in Johnston's door and unloaded 39 shots at the elderly woman as she fired a shot at the invaders with an old revolver. One officer then handcuffed Johnston as she lay dying. Drugs were then planted in her basement.

    In May, Tesler was convicted in Fulton County of lying in the investigation of the botched drug raid. He was sentenced to four years and six months in prison.

    Nahmias said federal authorities did not believe Tesler's state punishment was adequate.

    Tesler's plea almost didn't occur. Hours before the hearing, his lawyer, William McKenney, said his client had yet to make up his mind. At the plea hearing, Mc-Kenney disclosed he thought Tesler should have fought the charges at trial.

    "But he's making a decision that's only his to make," the defense attorney told U.S. District Judge Julie Carnes.

    When Assistant U.S. Attorney Jon-Peter Kelly read the "factual basis" of the case, Tesler waivered. Carnes then gave Tesler, wearing leg irons and an orange prison jumpsuit, time to read the prosecution's account.

    For the next 10 minutes, Tesler sat at the defense table reviewing it. McKenney then gave the document back to prosecutors, who made minor changes and returned it to Tesler for his review.

    Tesler, finally satisfied, agreed to the changes another 10 minutes later and entered his plea.

    State Sen. Vincent Fort ( D-Atlanta ), who attended the plea, said the two years since Johnston's shooting have been "hellish" for the northwest Atlanta community. He called for a robustly funded citizen review board to investigate police misconduct and legislation outlawing no-knock warrants to protect both the public and the police.

    "Hopefully, what happened today will be one step in a healing process, but we have a long way to go," Fort said. "Do I think something like this can happen again? Yes, I do."

    Author: Bill Rankin, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
    Pubdate: Fri, 31 Oct 2008
    Copyright: 2008 The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
    Source: http://www.mapinc.org/drugnews/v08/n986/a03.html?1042
  2. Euthanatos93420
    92yo Woman Shot by Alabama PO in No-Knock Raid - No Drugs found

    Brief:
    Old lady shot 39 times, drugs planted, Cop lies to FBI then claims his unit is corrupt not him.

    Seriously....shit like this is just getting old and repetitive. Swim would be outraged if he weren't desensitized. No....Swim is outraged. Calling bullshit on big brother.


    Atlanta officer enters guilty plea in deadly raid
    The Associated Press
    Published: October 30, 2008

    ATLANTA: A former Atlanta police officer pleaded guilty Thursday to federal conspiracy charges for his role in a botched drug raid that ended in the shooting death of a 92-year-old woman.

    Arthur Tesler faces more than 10 years in prison on a charge of conspiracy to violate civil rights resulting in death. He is to be sentenced in February.

    Police originally said police had gone to Kathryn Johnston's northwest Atlanta home in 2006 after an informant bought drugs there. But after finding none, officers tried to cover up the mistake by planting baggies of marijuana, prosecutors said.

    Tesler is the only officer tried in the raid that caused an outcry from civil rights activists and forced a shakeup of the Atlanta police department. Two other officers involved pleaded guilty to state and federal charges and never went to trial.

    In May, the 42-year-old Tesler was sentenced to 4 1/2 years in prison for lying to investigators. But federal prosecutors decided to pursue more charges after reviewing the case.

    "The reality is the only thing he was convicted of in state court is lying to the FBI," said U.S. Attorney David Nahmias. "We didn't think it was an appropriate measure of justice to Johnston's family."

    Tesler's attorney said his client was an honorable officer who was thrown into a corrupt unit. He had urged him to contest the charges.

    "We wanted him to fight," said William McKenney. "We wanted the jury to hear from him. But ultimately he didn't want to put his family through another trial."

    Tesler was in Johnston's backyard when plainclothes officers burst in through the front door the night of Nov. 21, 2006, using a special "no-knock" warrant to search for drugs. Johnston fired a single shot from a rusty revolver at the intruders, but hit no one, and officers fired 39 bullets, hitting the woman five or six times, prosecutors said.

    At his trial, Tesler testified that his former police partners, Jason R. Smith and Greg Junnier, planned the cover-up, and said he feared they would frame him if he didn't go along with their plan.

    Smith and Junnier have pleaded guilty to state manslaughter and federal civil rights charges. They have been helping investigators in other cases unrelated to Johnston's death and have not yet been sentenced.

    The botched raid prompted an investigation of the Atlanta Police Department and closer scrutiny on no-knock warrants, which are usually used to search for drugs and weapons. The department tightened its warrant requirements and shook up its narcotics unit.

    Nahmias said no further federal charges will be brought against Atlanta officers after an FBI investigation. The report will likely be delivered to Atlanta police this week, said FBI Special Agent Greg Jones.

    "I think we both were pleased the corruption wasn't systemic and widespread," said Jones, who called the plea deal an end to a "dark chapter" in Atlanta law enforcement.

    The shooting, which took place in a crime-ridden Atlanta neighborhood, enraged many residents and local officials who say it was an example of the police department's shoddy treatment of residents in the city's poor neighborhoods.


    http://www.iht.com/articles/ap/2008/10/30/america/Elderly-Shootout.php
  3. dark12
    What a disgusting world we live in.
    They even have the nerve to plant drugs on her after killing her. Just sick.
  4. Pondlife
    Threads merged
  5. fnord
    How will this effect the involved officers past cases? Could someone previously convicted of charges filed by the officers have their cases brought back to trial?
  6. Euthanatos93420
    Thanks

    I really hope this woman has not died in vain. That her 92 years included joyous and wonderful innocent experiences and that this sacrifice by the police state will serve as a testament to its inherent evil nature.

    An innocent, when sacrificed creates a seed of unparalleled revenge which will ulitmately culminate in the destruction of the tyrant who feeds on the repression the trauma of such incidence creates. By acknowledging these horrors and refusing to be willfully ignorant masses of consent we shall give life to SATISFACTION: REVENGE!!!!

    Watch Silent Hill. Jesus Christ WILL RETURN and the leather coverings of repression will be removed (Armaggedon - the true meaning: Removal of a leather covering). The sacrifice of these innocents and teachers shall not go unacknowledged and unavenged!!!!
  7. chillinwill
    Federal sentence urged for 3 ex-cops

    Federal prosecutors on Wednesday recommended federal sentences for three former Atlanta police officers who have pleaded guilty for their roles in the shooting death of an elderly woman during a botched drug raid.

    The report describes the frequent misconduct that occurred in the Police Department’s narcotics unit before the November 2006 shooting death of 92-year-old Kathryn Johnston. She was shot when narcotics officers mistakenly targeted her home as a drug house. They tried to cover up the deadly error.

    The U.S. attorney’s office is recommending that Jason R. Smith serve 151 months in federal prison —- about 12 1/2 years —- and that Gregg Junnier and Arthur Tesler serve 121 months (roughly 10 years).

    Prosecutors are asking for some sentence reductions for cooperation with the investigation, and that the federal sentences be served concurrently with any jail time they receive from their state charges.

    A federal judge will take the federal prosecutors’ report and recommended sentences into consideration before sentencing the three former officers on Feb. 23.

    “All three defendants could have prevented this tragedy, but instead they each abandoned their obligations as police officers and law-abiding citizens, leading to the death of an innocent woman,” federal prosecutors wrote.

    “The cover up in this case was remarkably choreographed and quite sophisticated. To protect their conspiracy, the defendants were willing to besmirch the reputation of the innocent woman who was killed as a result of their conduct.”

    It’s not clear whether any of the three are currently incarcerated.

    Junnier and Smith had their federal bond revoked in November 2007 and had to turn themselves in by the next month. But a U.S. attorney’s office spokesman, Patrick Crosby, refused to say Wednesday whether the three men were in federal custody.

    Prosecutors are recommending that the sentences for Junnier and Smith be reduced because of their cooperation with federal authorities.

    Junnier cooperated the most and, therefore, prosecutors said his sentence should get a “substantial reduction.” Smith cooperated enough to get 10 to 20 percent knocked off his sentence recommendation.

    All three pleaded guilty in federal court to charges of violating Johnston’s civil rights, but Smith and Junnier also pleaded guilty to state charges, including voluntary manslaughter. Tesler had a state conviction for lying to FBI agents overturned in appeals court.

    The trio often lied to judges to obtain search warrants, falsely claiming that they had personally observed drug purchases, that they had conducted recent surveillance at locations and that they “patted down” informants before sending them to make drug buys, prosecutors wrote.

    The federal report also states that Johnston’s death was the “foreseeable and perhaps inevitable culmination of a long-standing conspiracy in which the three defendants repeatedly and routinely ignored police procedures.”

    By Tim Eberly
    The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
    Thursday, February 12, 2009
    http://www.ajc.com/metro/content/printedition/2009/02/12/johnston0212.html
  8. dadrone
    Jesus fucking H. Christ the drug war is such a failure.

    F-- (yes that's a double minus)
  9. chillinwill
    ATLANTA, Georgia (CNN) -- Three former Atlanta police officers were sentenced Tuesday to prison terms ranging from five to 10 years for covering up a botched drug raid in which a 92-year-old woman was killed.

    Jason Smith was sentenced to 10 years in the November 2006 raid that left Kathryn Johnston dead in a hail of bullets. Former officers Greg Junnier and Arthur Tesler were sentenced to six and five years, respectively, said Patrick Crosby, spokesman for the U.S. attorney's office for the Northern District of Georgia.
    [IMGR="white"]http://www.drugs-forum.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=7567&stc=1&d=1235560753[/IMGR]
    Investigators determined the raid at Johnston's home was based on falsified paperwork stating that illegal drugs were present. The incident prompted a major overhaul of the Atlanta Police Department's drug unit.

    "Officers who think, as these defendants once did, that the ends justify the means or that 'taking shortcuts' and telling lies will not be discovered and punished should realize that they are risking their careers and their liberty." U.S. Attorney David Nahmias said in a written statement.

    "Officers who try to obstruct justice when their misconduct faces exposure, rather than cooperating in the investigation, should realize that they will face even more severe punishment."

    All three men pleaded guilty to federal charges of conspiracy to violate civil rights resulting in death. Smith and Junnier also pleaded guilty to state charges of voluntary manslaughter and making false statements, and Smith admitted to planting bags of marijuana in Johnston's home after her death.

    U.S. District Judge Julie Carnes ordered all three men to serve three years of supervised release after their prison terms, and to split Johnston's funeral costs, which totaled $8,180, authorities said.

    On Monday, Junnier broke down on the witness stand during a sentencing hearing, WXIA reported, saying, "I used to think I was a good person."

    Smith said, "I pray daily for Ms. Johnston. I also pray other officers in Atlanta will have the moral fortitude I didn't have," according to WXIA.

    Tesler was convicted on one state count of making false statements after filling out an affidavit saying that an informant had purchased crack cocaine at Johnston's home in a crime-plagued neighborhood near downtown Atlanta.

    The informant, however, denied ever having been to Johnston's home, leading to probes by local and federal authorities as well as the breakup and reorganization of the Atlanta police narcotics unit.

    The raid occurred as police were executing a so-called "no-knock" search warrant based on the faulty information. Police said Johnston fired at them with an old pistol during the raid, and they returned fire in self-defense. Johnston's one shot went through her front door and over the officers' heads; they responded with 39 shots, hitting the elderly woman five times.

    Tesler's state conviction was reversed on appeal, but he pleaded guilty to the federal charge. Junnier and Smith face sentencing March 5 on state charges including voluntary manslaughter, but according to their plea agreement, their sentence will be served at the same time as the federal sentence, authorities said.

    Shortly after the federal probe began, however, Junnier began cooperating with authorities, providing "valuable assistance in the investigation and prosecution of Smith and Tesler," according to the statement issued by Nahmias' office. Smith also cooperated "to a more limited extent," the statement said, adding that both Junnier and Smith's sentences were reduced because of their cooperation.

    Prosecutors have said that the officers regularly presented false information to obtain warrants and that they cut corners to make more time for lucrative side jobs providing additional security to businesses, often while on duty, and receiving cash payments.

    "As Atlanta police narcotics officers, these three defendants repeatedly failed to follow proper procedures and then lied under oath to obtain search warrants," Nahmias said. "Their routine violations of the Fourth Amendment led to the death of an innocent citizen."

    The investigation into the raid at Johnston's home also led to guilty pleas from the police sergeant in charge of the narcotics unit and another officer who admitted to extortion, prosecutors said.

    February 24, 2009
    CNN
    http://www.cnn.com/2009/CRIME/02/24/atlanta.police/index.html
  10. DopinDan
    10 years? These guys should get life in prison on death row, just as they would meat out punishment. They took a human life, they violated the rights of another individual to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.
  11. Euthanatos93420
    Fuckin A. Facetious humour is lost in text I guess. Still, it's analogous. Same thing happening over and over again. If you read any of my other related posts you'd know how insanely anti-religion I am.
  12. fnord
    Yes but 10~ years is much better then the original 4 1/2 they would of gotten,and plus this will cause alot of cops to think twice before killing to judges.
  13. Balzafire
    [h1]Family of woman killed in botched drug raid to receive $4.9 million[/h1]
    Atlanta, Georgia (CNN) -- The city of Atlanta will pay $4.9 million to the family of Kathryn Johnston, a 92-year-old woman killed in a botched November 2006 drug raid, Mayor Kasim Reed's office announced Monday.

    Johnston was shot to death by narcotics officers conducting a "no-knock" warrant. Investigators later determined the raid was based on falsified paperwork stating that illegal drugs were present in the home.

    The incident prompted a major overhaul of the Atlanta police drug unit, and three former police officers were sentenced to prison terms for a cover-up that ensued.

    Johnston's family will receive $2.9 million sometime in fiscal 2011, the city said, with the remaining $2 million to be paid in fiscal 2012, on or before August 15, 2011.

    The payment represents the settlement of a lawsuit filed against the city by Sarah Dozier, Johnston's niece, Reed's office said in a statement. Initially filed in state court, the suit was moved to federal court, where a judge ordered the parties to mediation.

    As the search warrant was being executed November 21, 2006, at Johnston's home, she fired at officers with an old pistol, apparently believing her home was being broken into. Six officers returned fire. Johnston's one shot went through her front door and over the officers' heads. They responded with 39 shots, hitting the elderly woman five times.

    "The resolution of this case is an important step in the healing process for the city and its residents," Reed said in the statement. "As a result of the incident, several police officers were indicted in federal and state court on charges and were later convicted and sentenced for their actions. In addition, the narcotics unit of the Atlanta Police Department was completely reorganized, which included changes in policy and personnel."

    Last year, former officer Jason Smith was sentenced to 10 years in federal prison, while former officers Greg Junnier and Arthur Tesler were sentenced to six and five years, respectively.

    All three men pleaded guilty to federal charges of conspiracy to violate civil rights resulting in death. Smith and Junnier also pleaded guilty to state charges of voluntary manslaughter and making false statements, and Smith admitted to planting bags of marijuana in Johnston's home after her death.

    U.S. District Judge Julie Carnes ordered the three to split Johnston's funeral costs of $8,180, and to serve three years of supervised release after they complete their prison terms.

    "I pray daily for Ms. Johnston," Smith said at the sentencing hearing, according to CNN affiliate WXIA-TV. "I also pray other officers in Atlanta will have the moral fortitude I didn't have."

    Tesler was convicted on one state count of making false statements after filling out an affidavit saying that an informant had purchased crack cocaine at Johnston's home, in a crime-plagued neighborhood near downtown Atlanta.

    The informant, however, denied ever having been to Johnston's home, leading to probes by federal and state authorities as well as the breakup and reorganization of the narcotics unit.

    Tesler's state conviction was reversed on appeal. According to their plea agreements, Junnier and Smith will serve their state sentences concurrently with the federal sentence.

    Shortly after the probe began, Junnier began cooperating with authorities, providing "valuable assistance in the investigation and prosecution of Smith and Tesler," according to a statement issued last year by federal prosecutors. Smith also cooperated to a lesser extent, and both men's sentences were reduced in exchange for their cooperation.

    Prosecutors have said that officers regularly presented false information to obtain warrants and that they cut corners to make more time for lucrative side jobs providing additional security to businesses, often while on duty, and receiving cash payments.

    The investigation into the botched raid also led to guilty pleas from the police sergeant in charge of the narcotics unit and another officer who admitted to extortion, authorities said.

    By the CNN Wire Staff
    August 16, 2010
    http://www.cnn.com/2010/CRIME/08/16/georgia.botched.raid/
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