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Full interview with Mental Health Foundation CEO on effectiveness of antidepressants

By ~lostgurl~, Feb 27, 2008 | Updated: Feb 27, 2008 | | |
  1. ~lostgurl~
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    A new entry has been added to Drugs Archive

    Description:

    7 mins
    27 Feb 2008

    The NZ Mental Health Foundation is welcoming a report which says anti-depressants may not be as effective as claimed.
    But the head of the foundation, Judi Clements, says people taking the drugs should not stop treatment without consulting their GP.
    She says that for some people anti-depressant drugs are effective but people should also look at other ways to treat depression.
    Watch the full interview with CEO Judi Clements.

    To check it out, rate it or add comments, visit Full interview with Mental Health Foundation CEO on effectiveness of antidepressants
    The comments you make there will appear in the posts below.

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  1. ~lostgurl~
    Study says depression sufferers being prescribed false hope

    [​IMG]
    A new entry has been added to Drugs Archive

    Description:

    2 mins
    27 February 2008

    A groundbreaking new study says tens of thousands of kiwis taking anti-depressant pills are being prescribed false hope.

    The study, carried out by Britain's University of Hull, found that pills like Prozac have no ‘clinically significant’ effect for most people.

    The findings are a big blow to a big industry - sales of anti-depressants worldwide totalled over $24 billion last year.

    The study found that the drugs, known as SSRIs, show a ‘very small’ improvement for almost all patients, except a minority who are severely depressed.

    The mental health foundation welcomes the results.

    However the companies behind the hugely popular anti-depressants say their products are effective.

    Britain's health secretary has announced a three-year programme to train therapists in talking treatments, an option the New Zealand Mental Health foundation says our government should fund.

    The foundation says people who are taking the drugs should not be alarmed by the study, and should continue their prescriptions as usual.

    However, it says talking is always a good option and hopes the findings will bring the issue of depression out into the open.

    To check it out, rate it or add comments, visit Study says depression sufferers being prescribed false hope
    The comments you make there will appear in the posts below.
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