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GETTING HIGH ON TEA AT SA’S GANJA CAFÉ

By Alfa, Jul 5, 2004 | |
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  1. Alfa
    GETTING HIGH ON TEA AT SA'S FIRST GANJA CAFE

    High tea will be on offer in Knysna next month, if a Rastafarian community
    opens the country's first dagga "coffee shop".

    Dagga muffins, chocolates, icecream, tea and coffee will all be sold in the
    effort to "put us on the international map", said Levi Bailey Tafari, a
    priest in the Boboshanti order of Rastas.

    Police are now reported to "have an understanding" with the Rasta community
    of around 100 adults and 40 children, who live in the Judah Square
    community in Khayelethu, just outside Knysna.

    The houses are painted in bright primary colours and the roadside walls are
    etched with Rasta quotes and slogans.

    The Rastas are confident that police will not close down their coffee shop.
    Knysna police spokesmen were not available for comment at the time of going
    to press.

    "This shop has been my vision for about 10 years," said Bailey Tafari. "We
    Rastas in South Africa were born poor. It is only the young people who have
    education. So we have decided to push ourselves onto a level with other people.

    "In other places, like Amsterdam and Germany, there is legal trading in dagga."

    Other Boboshanti Rastas, dressed in white to show that it was a day of
    fasting, touched fingers briefly and bowed their heads in reverence before
    lighting a "bong" and the sweet, acrid fumes quickly filled the air.

    Said Bailey Tafari. "If we don't do things like open this shop, we are
    going to stay in the gutter."



    The dagga delicacies are due to be sold from next month.

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