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Grief over teen's OD (ecstasy)

By Euphoric, Apr 27, 2009 | | |
Rating:
4/5,
  1. Euphoric
    Grief over teen's OD

    Girl who died after taking ecstasy knew the dangers of drugs, says mom


    [​IMG]

    The parents of a 14-year-old Edmonton girl who died after taking ecstasy are struggling to understand why their daughter, who was part of an anti-drug program, took the pills.

    "Cassie had gone through DARE," said Angela Eyre, mother of Cassie Eyre. "She knew about drugs because I told her I didn't ever want her to take any. And she had told me she wouldn't because it would ruin her complexion."

    WARNED ABOUT DRUGS

    "I remember telling her just a couple weeks ago to stay away from drugs because there had been reports of ecstasy being laced with rat poison. I thought that would be enough to scare her, but I guess it wasn't," said Cassie's stepfather Guy Buehler, referring to a recent incident at Paul Band First Nation where two teen girls died after overdosing on ecstasy.

    Cassie was taken off life-support Saturday afternoon at Stollery Children's Hospital after she and her best friend Ashley, also 14, fell ill Friday night after ingesting a batch of ecstasy pills.

    The pair were attending the Rock 'n' Ride Dance Party at West Edmonton Mall's Galaxy- land amusement park when they were rushed to hospital and transferred to the pediatric intensive care unit.

    Angela had been celebrating her birthday that night at a bar when her daughter Deanna, 17, called to tell her Cassie and Ashley had been taken to the hospital. They immediately rushed over to see the girls.

    Angela said she was shocked by the sight of her daughter, hooked up to various IV needles and a tube down her throat to help her breathe. Ashley's condition stabilized and is said to be doing well, but Cassie's condition kept worsening.
    Click here to find out more!

    "Her blood pressure wouldn't stay up, her oxygen level was low. So they gave her blood transfusions. And when they tried to hook her up to life support, they had to give her CPR for almost 20 minutes because her heart had stopped again," Angela said.

    Cassie was taken off life-support shortly after 4:30 p.m.

    Her parents later learned she had taken six pills and each one was three times the normal dosage, adding they think it was the first time she had taken the drug.

    A 16-year-old suspected drug dealer believed to be linked to the case was arrested Saturday afternoon after police tracked him to the area of 105 Street and 106 Avenue.

    SUSPECT COLLAPSED

    After leading officers on a foot chase through a nearby laundromat and into a parking lot, the teen suffered "medical distress" and collapsed as police tried to handcuff him, said Staff Sgt. Graham Hogg.

    The teen was taken to hospital in critical condition and has since improved, Hogg said. He will likely be released from hospital this week and could face charges.

    Angela said she has no idea who this suspect may be, calling him "some random guy at the mall."

    By CLARA HO, SUN MEDIA

    Mon, April 27, 2009

    http://www.edmontonsun.com/News/Edmonton/2009/04/27/9257741-sun.html

Comments

  1. ex-junkie
    why the fuck did she take 6 pills ffs? silly girl...
  2. Alfa
    Because DARE did not educate her of the real dangers, but uses bizarre rhetoric that most kids know is bullshit anyway.

    I wonder what was in those pills. Multiple people seem to have collapsed from them. This would not happen with MDMA.
  3. fnord

    You mean like this?
    Or this?

    It be nice if local activists got together and worked out a way to educate the puclib,free books/pamphlets on harm reduction,organize teach ins, etc.
  4. Euphoric
    Well she was only 14, and "she had taken six pills and each one was three times the normal dosage". Who knows what the police or media deem to be the normal dosage, or if this statement is true, but if it is, then it's possible that she took over 1.8 grams of MDMA plus whatever else may be in the pills.

    I wonder if the police or media would point out if the pills appeared to be from the same batch as the ones involved in the deaths last month.
  5. geezaman
    Another saddening case.

    "...Her parents later learned she had taken six pills and each one was three times the normal dosage....."

    Snuffkin wonders where they learned this, whether this was from a pill or tox analysis, or just hearsay. Why would a producer put 3x the norm dose in a single pill, does not add up for Snuffkin?

    Peace
    G
  6. Euphoric
  7. Alfa
    That would make sense. If it is from the same batch, then that would be reason to track the producers down and trial for manslaughter.

    At times like this, it becomes ever more evident that Drugs-Forum, as a media channel with over 4 million reader per year, should have investigative reporters. They could call the authorities and question them. In some cases and often quite interesting things come up. Let me know if you'd be interested in this Euphoric.
  8. cannabis-sam
    well if she took six pills, on her first, time there is little wonder she had a bad reaction, especially as MDMA pills contain all sorts of other crap that could also be toxic and those levels, and the Just say no approach has been proven not to work. The few pieces of good advice from the anti drugs group were probably ignored when she discovered what crap it all was.
  9. chillinwill
    Doctor calls it unlikely that three teens overdosed on Ecstasy

    When two girls, ages 14 and 15, died last month in an Edmonton hospital after taking pills they believed to be the dance-club drug Ecstasy, there were rumours that the tablets had been laced with rat poison.
    [IMGR="white"]http://www.drugs-forum.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=8386&stc=1&d=1241183913[/IMGR]
    The theory made little sense from the start:Nine girls of the Paul First Nation had taken the same pills before a wedding at the native reserve west of Edmonton. Three became ill, two died. Lethal poisons are not typically this selective.

    The hospital did not find rat poison in the girls' bloodstream and did find Ecstasy. But in a region desperately seeking answers to the Ecstasy mystery -- one that deepened after another 14-year-old girl died after taking what she believed was Ecstasy last Friday at a party at West Edmonton Mall -- the poison theory may have been closer to the truth, drug researchers say, than the story offered by local news reports that the girls overdosed.

    Charles Grob believes there is a strong chance that a deadly batch of adulterated pills is making the rounds in and around Edmonton, though health officials and law-enforcement groups have issued no such public warning.

    Dr. Grob, a professor of psychiatry at UCLA, was the first U. S. researcher to conduct human tests of methylenedioxymethamphetamine, or MDMA, the technical name for Ecstasy, since it was outlawed in the U. S. in 1984. It is rare for anyone to "overdose" on the drug in its pure form, he said.

    There are but a few dozen deaths linked annually with Ecstasy in North America; mostly, they arise from complications, such as pre-existing heart problems or hyperthermia that occurs when high, frenetic raver kids overheat themselves.

    But three girls, all within a few weeks of each other, in the same vicinity, and none of whom were observed exercising hyper-actively, he says, is too unusual to be MDMA-caused. "I think there's something else in those pills," Dr. Grob says. "It would be awfully coincidental if all three of these teenage girls had congenital heart problems that had not been identified earlier. I'd put my money on a drug substitute."

    Ecstasy is generally one of the least-lethal illegal drugs available: The chairman of the U. K. Home Office's Council on the Misuse of Drugs stirred controversy this year when he published a paper in a medical journal arguing that, based on mortality figures, Ecstasy is a less pressing public health matter than the more deadly horseback riding. But it is frequently falsely advertised. Fifty per cent or more of pills marketed on the street as Ecstasy are actually a cocktail of a different sort: some MDMA mixed with tranquilizers, caffeine, cocaine or "whatever is in the back of the [manufacturer's] cupboard," Dr. Grob says.

    "The chance that this is MDMA or straight MDMA is so infinitesimal," says Ethan Nadelmann, executive director of the New York-based Drug Policy Alliance, a group advocating drug policy reform. "This explanation of an overdose makes no sense."

    Like Dr. Grob, he believes that the aberrant cluster of Ecstasy-related deaths all in the same localized area surely points to dangerous, adulterated pills on the market -- including a more toxic substance that the three dead girls may have taken inadvertently in lethal amounts. Cassandra Williams, who died from pills bought at the mall party, reportedly took six; Trinity Dawn Bird and Leah Dominique House, from the Paul Band, reportedly took five each.

    "The number of fatalities associated just with pure ingestion of MDMA is so close to zero," Mr. Nadelmann says. "This must have been something involving a drug that was not MDMA. That's the scary thing, that there must be something out there being marketed as Ecstasy, which is not actually MDMA."

    What may be particularly concerning, he says, is that Edmonton's Ecstasy users are being led to believe these were simple "overdoses," and have not been publicly warned about this more dangerous possibility, leaving open the worrying prospect of more deaths. The RCMP, in charge of the Paul Band case, arrested a dealer alleged to have sold the girls the drugs, but could not recover any samples of the pills for analysis. Corporal Wayne Oakes says there is no evidence of "overdose" yet, but neither is there any evidence of possible toxic drug cocktails. Both theories must wait until the medical examiner's pathological report, which will likely take three months or longer. Until then, the Mounties can issue no warnings about unproven dangers. "The whole thing is about being factual," he says.

    So far, police have stuck with warning teens to stay away from drugs altogether. "The extremely tragic consequences associated with this drug use speaks to the dangers of illicit street drugs, regardless of their chemical ingredients," read an RCMP press release following the Paul Band incident. "There is a rather old saying that continues to hold a resounding message, 'Just say no!'."

    But this only goes so far, Mr. Nadelmann warns: teens who have used Ecstasy frequently, with no ill effects (there are likely many; data show Ecstasy use in Western Canada has roughly tripled in the past five years) are unlikely to be much persuaded by Reagan-era platitudes. Some experts note that warnings about particularly dangerous pills in circulation might grab their attention. When overdose clusters appear in Vancouver, usually involving excessively potent heroin, police, emergency responders and clinics don't wait for toxicology reports to get the word out to street users, says David Marsh, a medical director at Vancouver's Coastal Health authority.

    Elsewhere, however, authorities are sometimes so dedicated to the drug war that they will not or cannot consider "harm reduction" strategies, including drug-use safety precautions, Mr. Nadelmann says.

    In Edmonton, police so far have been heartfelt in expressing sympathy for the families of the dead victims, and in pleading with children to stay clean. But until someone warns those children of at least the possibility of dangerous pills being passed off as Ecstasy, Mr. Nadelmann worries there remains a very real chance that Edmonton's bad Ecstasy could lead to more agony yet.

    Kevin Libin
    National Post
    May 1, 2009
    http://www.nationalpost.com/news/story.html?id=1551259
  10. Euphoric
    I wrote a journalist who had written an article for an Edmonton paper on the ecstasy deaths. This is what I wrote:

    This was the response:
    I don't think I will pester her further and I appreciate that she responded, but I believe police arrested the dealers very soon after in both cases and likely searched their homes. I would think there would be a good chance that this would yield samples of what the girls took. Then again maybe they had a variety of pills laying around or had just sold the last of them.

    Including these Canadian deaths and a recent UK one, it seems a bit odd that all these 'ecstasy' related deaths have been women. Could MDMA, or contaminants or non-MDMA drugs in the pills, pose a greater threat to women? Do women use more frequently, statistically?
  11. sandoz1943
    Keep in mind these were young girls who tend to be small in stature and weigh less than the guys. This could be why more girls are falling ill. Why cant any one say what was on them? Wouldnt this keep others from eating them as well? Why cant anyone say what was in the pills or provide the toxicology reports. Its like they are suppressing the information until the media hysteria is over. Months from now I suspect the will be a tiny back page article revealing this wasnt MDMA at all but that headline isnt as sensational as "Teens Dead From Ecstasy Overdose" is it? There never seems to be a follow up to these stories.
  12. Bojangles
    AFOAF took 6 pills her first time and they were good pills, everyone else was rollin off 1 pill. No one could understand while she wasn't rolling until it was later discovered she was on an SSRI antidepressant, Zoloft and high dose and it was counteracting the XTC. Thank god nothing bad happened to her though. She to this day says she didn't feel anything. So I really wanna know what was in those six pills that killled that girl.
  13. Alfa
    These deaths should be used to promote a national ecstasy testing program similar to what we have in the netherlands. Such program would definately save lives and give the government a good view on whats happening in its country.
    I am quite positive that this lies within reach if someone grasps the oppertunity. All that is needed is to find scientists to make positive statments on the concept and to mobilise the media to pressure politicians into saying yes. I am quite certain that the Dutch program would be willing to proclaim their success in the media.

    I hope someone will read this and take up this idea.
  14. Euphoric
    Can you provide any links to find more info on this program? Is there a formal name for the program?
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