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Hallucinogenic Amazonian plant used to poison spear tips found growing in Suffolk gar

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4/5,
  1. chillinwill
    Plant experts were left mystified after a deadly tropical plant, normally found in the Amazon, appeared in an English garden.

    Phyllis Abbott, 79, first noticed strange looking shoots sprouting in the flowerbed of her Suffolk garden last Spring.

    She and husband George, 84, contacted the Royal Horticultural Society and were shocked to discover the plant was the highly poisonous Datura Stramonium or 'Devil's Snare' and could grow to 12ft high.

    Mrs Abbott said: 'It was just a tiny little thing when I found it but it has been growing and growing every since and now it is as high as my chest.

    'I have no idea how it got there, I'm completely puzzled.'

    The plant, a member of the Deadly Nightshade family, has a poison that causes dry mouth, blurred vision, heart irregularities, hallucinations, and eventually coma and death in severe cases.

    It is traditionally used by South American Indians to poison their hunting spears, arrows and fishing hooks and in sacred ceremonies by Hindu monks for its hallucinogenic qualities.

    While its arrival is a mystery, the couple have been told the seed may have arrived via bird droppings.

    Mrs Abbott, who has nine grandchildren and five great-grandchildren, said The Royal Horticultural Society explained the plant could be dangerous, but only if the couple didn't handle it properly.

    'We are not worried because we know about it now and can keep away from it.' said Mrs Abbott.

    'It will stay in my garden until the weekend in case anyone wants to come and see it, but then I am going to cut it down.'

    James Armitage of the Royal Horticultural Society, said: 'These plants are not native to Britain and we think their seeds are spread by birds.

    'They belong to the same family as Deadly Nightshade and are highly poisonous if eaten.

    'If you find one in your garden and have young children or are worried you can dig them up, but you can grow them as ornamental plants.

    'It is worth remembering that there are lots of other poisonous plants which are much more common in British gardens, like aconite and yew.'

    Datura Stramonium, also known as Devil's Apple, Trumpet or Snare has large, pale, trumpet shaped flowers and spiny pods.

    Its leaves give off a pungent nauseating odour and the flowers smell sweet, but both are narcotic and can induce hallucinations or stupor if breathed in for too long.
    Its seeds are particularly poisonous if eaten.

    By Daily Mail Reporter
    August 7, 2009
    Daily Mail
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencet...ear-tips-growing-Suffolk-garden.html?ITO=1490

Comments

  1. Alfa
    Re: Hallucinogenic Amazonian plant used to poison spear tips found growing in Suffolk

    These people are completely off their tits! Nightshades have been around since the dark ages and Datura is available in pretty much any plant shop or nursery around Europe. So its probably sold just around the corner of their house.

    If there is one drug that lies deep within the cultural roots of Europe, then its Nightshades.

    There is no such thing as the 'Deadly Nightshade Family'. Only Nightshades as a category or family if you will. Deadly Nightshade is a common name for the plant BellaDonna (Atropa belladonna). Its cultural roots goes back far in European history.


    Well what do you know. I just browsed plant shop websites in Suffolk and big surprise: they offer Datura plants and seeds.
  2. fnord
    Re: Hallucinogenic Amazonian plant used to poison spear tips found growing in Suffolk

    Your dead on alfa,datura jhas been in europe for a loooong time.




    Info form a unlinkable site.
  3. Thirdedge
    Re: Hallucinogenic Amazonian plant used to poison spear tips found growing in Suffolk

    What a great pic though, everything about Datura seems to scream "Don,t f#@k with me, I am poisonous". It just plain looks deadly.
  4. fnord
    Re: Hallucinogenic Amazonian plant used to poison spear tips found growing in Suffolk

    Were nightshades actually used in arrowheads? Ive never heard of this before..

    EDIT: Oh wait i just noticed its the daily mail,they don't need facts to back up there publications.
  5. cannabis-sam
    Re: Hallucinogenic Amazonian plant used to poison spear tips found growing in Suffolk

    I bet that's the same face she makes at the point of orgasm.

    I know this contributes absolutely nothing to the discussion but I couldn't resist.
  6. chillinwill
    Re: Hallucinogenic Amazonian plant used to poison spear tips found growing in Suffolk

    LOL I was thinking the same thing when I first saw her expression
  7. shhpongebob
    Re: Hallucinogenic Amazonian plant used to poison spear tips found growing in Suffolk

    you guys are wierdies, :p, some creepy olf napolean dynamite lady...

    anywho, yeah, what in the world is up with this article? is this lady famous? because it seems to me, its the most boring thing i have ever read. if its local news then fine, although it doesent really contribute to the forum, but thats none my bussness. this article is weak.
  8. chibi curmudgeon
    Re: Hallucinogenic Amazonian plant used to poison spear tips found growing in Suffolk

    ...Those are sold in most garden stores in the U.S. I wouldn't say they're one of the more common ornamentals, but I'm not surprised to see them. When I lived in New Orleans, my street had several Brugmansia on the neutral ground (or median as some call it.)
  9. honourableone
    Poisonous plant warning for Leicestershire and Rutland

    Horticultural experts are warning people to look out for a poisonous plant found cropping up in Leicestershire and Rutland.

    Datura stramonium, also known as thorn apple and devil's snare, is potentially poisonous and can cause hallucinations.

    The warning comes after a couple in Exton, in Rutland, realised the plant had been growing in their garden all summer.

    There has also been a case reported in Loughborough.

    The Royal Horticultural Society says the plant – which features as a magical trap in the Harry Potter books – is fairly easy to remove, but should be burnt to stop seeds dispersing.


    Plant expert Dusty Beesley, of Beesley's Nursery, Ravenstone, said it is potentially dangerous.

    He said: "It is poisonous and the symptoms are unquenchable thirst, vomiting, enlarged pupils, nervous twitches and jumbled speech. These might last for several days.

    "In some cases, it can cause convulsions and death in very severe cases. You would probably need to be treated by a doctor.

    "If you find you have the plant, you've got to destroy it, but don't handle it with bare hands."

    The weed flowers from July to October and has wide, funnel-shaped flowers. These are usually white but can be purple or lilac.

    Leicestershire horticultural expert Peter Gamble said people need to take care with the plant, but that there is no need to panic if you find one in the garden. "It's a plant that occurs from time to time – you sometimes get it brought in from bird seed," he said.

    "It is poisonous, but then so are a lot of plants that people grow in their gardens without any bother.

    "Unless people are going to eat it, which is unlikely, it shouldn't cause too many problems. I don't think people should worry about it and the plant is actually very beautiful in its own right.
    "You get these oddities occurring from time to time."

    Judy and Kit Swinfen, of Exton, Rutland, were watching TV when they saw a report about a poisonous plant which looked the same as one in their garden. They have since removed it.

    Mrs Swinfen said: "We got rid of it pretty much straight away.
    "It was there all through the summer. I'm not sure how dangerous it is but I think it's a good idea to get rid of it.

    "Any poisonous plants should be disposed of."


    By the Leicester Mercury, August 27th 2009
    Original source: http://www.thisisleicestershire.co....t-warning/article-1289441-detail/article.html
  10. Potter
    Re: Hallucinogenic Amazonian plant used to poison spear tips found growing in Suffolk

    HEY LOOK KIDS FREE DRUGS!!!

    Oh my god... did any one tell the reporters you can buy this plant in almost any nursery? Oh the horror, won't someone think of the children?
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