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iDosing: spot the difference between the Sun's and the Mail's stories

  1. Synchronium
    iDosing: spot the difference between the Sun's and the Mail's stories

    iDosing is the made up internet craze where teenagers download digital drugs in the form of MP3 sound files and get high. Or something. I'm not making it up - the Sun and the Mail have reported it. Google News shows a time stamp of an hour earlier for The Mail's story.

    Now, if you want to understand how journalism works, compare and contrast ...


    Videos on YouTube
    The Mail
    Videos posted on YouTube show a young girl freaking out and leaping up in fear, a teenager shaking violently and a young boy in extreme distress.
    The Sun
    Videos posted on YouTube show a young girl freaking out, a teenager shaking violently and a young boy in extreme distress as they listen to the sounds.
    [h3]Flocking kids[/h3]
    The Mail
    But there has been such alarm in the U.S. that the Oklahoma Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs has issued a warning to children not to do it.
    ‘Kids are going to flock to these sites just to see what it is about and it can lead them to other places, spokesman Mark Woodward said.
    The Sun
    There has been such alarm in the US that the Oklahoma Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs has issued a warning to children not to do it.
    Spokesman Mark Woodward said: "Kids are going to flock to these sites just to see what it is about and it can lead them to other places."
    News9.com from a few days ago
    "Kids are going to flock to these sites just to see what it is about and it can lead them to other places," said OBNDD spokesperson Mark Woodward.
    A willingness to experiment
    The Mail
    He added that parental awareness is key to preventing future problems, since I-dosing could indicate a willingness to experiment with drugs.
    The Sun
    He added parental awareness is key to preventing future problems, as iDosing could indicate a willingness to experiment with drugs.
    Newson6.com from a few days ago
    The Oklahoma Bureau of Narcotics said parental awareness is key to preventing future problems, since I-dosing could indicate a willingness to experiment with drugs.
    Schools in Mustang
    The Mail
    Schools in the Mustang area recently sent out a letter warning parents about the new trend after several high school students reported having physiological effects after trying one of these digital downloads.
    The Sun
    Schools in the Mustang area recently sent out a letter warning parents about the new trend after several students reported experiencing physiological effects after listening to the downloads.
    Newson6.com from a few days ago
    Recently Mustang Public Schools sent out a letter warning parents about the new trend after several high school students reported having physiological effects after trying one of these digital downloads.
    A ship's horn
    The Mail
    some sound like a ship’s horn being repeated again and again whilst others are more abrasive and resemble cheap synthesizers being played very fast.
    The Sun
    Some sound like a ship's horn being repeated again and again whilst others are more abrasive and resemble cheap synthesizers being played very fast.
    Binaural beats
    The Mail
    Dr Helane Wahbeh, a Naturopathic Physician and Clinician Researcher at the Oregon Health and Science University, said: 'Binaural beats happen when opposite ears receive two different sound waves.
    The Sun
    Dr Helane Wahbeh, a Naturopathic Physician and Clinician Researcher at the Oregon Health and Science University, said: "Binaural beats happen when opposite ears receive two different sound waves.
    NPR.org from a few days ago
    Dr. HELANE WAHBEH (Naturopathic Physician and Clinician Researcher, Oregon Health and Science University): ... Binaural beats happen when opposite ears receive two different sound waves.
    Not similar to cocaine or ecstasy
    The Mail
    ‘But when you listen to these sounds with stereo headphones, the listener senses the difference between the two frequencies as another beat that sounds like it's coming from the inside of the head.’
    But Dr Wahbeh denied there was any possibility that someone could experience similar effects to cocaine or ecstasy.
    She said: 'We did a small controlled study with four people, and we did not see any brain wave activity shifting to match the binaural beat that people were listening to.’
    The Sun
    "When you listen to these sounds with stereo headphones, the listener senses the difference between the two frequencies as another beat that sounds like it's coming from the inside of the head."
    But Dr Wahbeh denied there was any possibility that someone could experience similar effects to cocaine or ecstasy.
    She said: "We did a small controlled study with four people, and we did not see any brain wave activity shifting to match the binaural beat that people were listening to."
    From npr.org a few days ago
    But when you listen to these sounds with stereo headphones, the listener senses the difference between the two frequencies as another beat that sounds like it's coming from the inside of the head. ...
    NORRIS [interviewer]: Now, based on your research, is it possible that listening to these tracks might lead someone to experience something tantamount to the effects of taking cocaine or ecstasy or even Viagra?
    Dr. WAHBEH: We did a small controlled study with four people, and we did not see any brain wave activity shifting to match the binaural beat that people were listening to.
    Two iDosings, please.
    Posted on July 21, 2010 by Malcolm Coles
    http://www.malcolmcoles.co.uk/blog/idosing-sun-daily-mail/

Comments

  1. EscapeDummy
    Fucking pathetic, this kind of plagiarism would have been caught in even my 9th grade class. So why do they teach us not to plagiarize throughout life, when professional papers are doing it?
  2. godztear
    Do they have the same writer for all sources? :s

    This whole thing is actually starting to make me wonder if the creator's of I-Doses is actually paying for the media publicity, because quite honestly there is absolutely no comparison to the effects felt from the music versus drugs.

    BTW the teen shaking violently was probably having a seizure, in my opinion.
  3. Alfa
    Most of the news works like this. An article gets written by a media outlet. Then the rest of the media replicates it. Often without checking any facts.

    There have been many occasions where the media has been fooled by a fake press release, that gets into one or a few media outlets. After that its wildfire. Remember Cheese (the new deadly drug)?
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