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  1. Motorhead
    IOC probes women's hockey celebration

    Hockey Canada apologizes for party on ice

    The International Olympic Committee will investigate the behaviour of the Canadian women's hockey players who celebrated their gold medal at the Vancouver Games by drinking alcohol on the ice.

    Several Canadian players returned to the ice surface at Canada Hockey Place roughly 30 minutes after their 2-0 win over the U.S. on Thursday night.

    The players drank cans of beer and bottles of champagne, and smoked cigars with their gold medals draped around their necks.

    Gilbert Felli, the IOC's executive director of the Olympic Games, said he wasn't aware of the celebration until informed by an Associated Press reporter.

    "If that's the case, that is not good. It is not what we want to see," he said. "I don't think it's a good promotion of sport values. If they celebrate in the changing room, that's one thing, but not in public."

    Felli said the IOC will talk to the International Ice Hockey Federation and the Canadian Olympic Committee to collect more information for the purposes of its investigation.

    "We will investigate what happened. ... We will first find the facts and then act accordingly," he said.

    Poulin under-age in B.C.

    Among those drinking were Marie-Philip Poulin of Quebec City, the youngest player on Team Canada and its fourth-line centre, who scored twice in the first period. The 18-year-old Poulin turns 19 next month, but right now she would be under the legal drinking age in B.C.

    Steve Keough, a spokesman for the Canadian Olympic Committee, said the COC had not provided the alcohol, nor instructed the players to celebrate on the ice.

    "We condone celebrations. ... We don't condone actions of irresponsibility," Keough said. "I think Canadians understand it's quite an emotional moment for our team. It was not our intention to go against any IOC protocols."

    In a statement released late Thursday, Hockey Canada apologized for the on-ice party.

    "The members of Team Canada apologize if their on-ice celebrations, after fans had left the building, have offended anyone," the statement read.

    "In the excitement of the moment, the celebration left the confines of our dressing room and shouldn't have. The team regrets that its gold-medal celebration may have caused the IOC or COC any embarrassment.

    "Our players and team vow to uphold the values of the Olympics moving forward and view this situation as a learning experience."

    Feb. 26, 2010
    John Molinaro
    CBC Sports
    http://www.cbc.ca/olympics/hockey/story/2010/02/26/sp-hockey-women-drinking.html

Comments

  1. chillinwill
    Just saw this on the news. Personally I don't see this as a big deal, but that is just me. I mean hell, they did just win the women's hockey in the Olympics.
  2. Motorhead
    lol a quote from the reader comments
    This was all over CBC newsworld this morning and the vast majority of viewer response was similar to this. What is more Canadian than hockey and beer? I don't think the IOC gets this inherently Canadian tradition of celebrating on the ice with a few cold ones!

    I hope this blows over quickly as these games have been marred by enough negativity as is.
  3. chillinwill
    And how many people drink alcohol in Canada? 75% or more? I don't know the actual stats, but damn its a beer. Now if they pulled out a bowl and started smoking weed or something, I can see how the response to that would be negative. But come on, alcohol? In baseball, after winning a world serious, they drink champagne and pour it all over themselves. In NASCAR after winning a race, I have seen them drink beer. Other sports do similar things as well. Granted this is in America and not in Canada, but the countries are not that much different from each other.
  4. Motorhead
    lol, to clarify the reader I quoted was commenting in jest. Most Canadian readers/viewers are wondering what all the fuss is about. The IOC and the CBC are the ones putting a negative spin on this.

    Fans south of the border are a little miffed. This is a reader comment from an American scoop.

    I wonder if the fact they are smoking cigars and that its women that the media want to put a little negativity on this. If this were the mens team I dont think there would be a fuss.
  5. Motorhead
    Team Canada apologizes for post-game behavior

    [imgl=black]http://www.drugs-forum.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=13403&stc=1&d=1267206264[/imgl]VANCOUVER - Hockey Canada apologized Thursday for an impromptu party the Olympic women's hockey team threw for itself on the Canada Hockey Place ice after winning the gold medal.

    Canadian players, still wearing their uniforms and with gold medals draped around their necks, celebrated their victory by drinking champagne and beer at centre ice following a 2-0 win over the United States.

    The International Olympic Committee said it will investigate the celebration, which included drinking by one of Canada's underage players.

    In a statement released late Thursday, Hockey Canada apologized.

    "The members of Team Canada apologize if their on-ice celebrations, after fans had left the building, have offended anyone," the statement read.

    "In the excitement of the moment, the celebration left the confines of our dressing room and shouldn't have. The team regrets that its gold medal celebration may have caused the IOC or COC any embarrassment.

    "Our players and team vow to uphold the values of the Olympics moving forward and view this situation as a learning experience."

    Marie-Philip Poulin, who at 18 is not old enough to legally drink in British Columbia, was one of the players taking part in the post-game boozing.

    Later in the night, Poulin met the media at the Molson Hockey House, but answered only two questions that were restricted to the game.

    Gilbert Felli, the IOC's executive director of the Olympic Games, said he wasn't aware of the celebration until informed by a reporter with The Associated Press.

    "If that's the case, that is not good," he said. "It is not what we want to see. "I don't think it's a good promotion of sport values. If they celebrate in the changing room, that's one thing, but not in public."

    Felli said the IOC would talk to the International Ice Hockey Federation and the Canadian Olympic Committee to get more information.

    The makeshift party was still going on nearly an hour after the game.

    Gillian Apps passed around a victory cigar, while tournament MVP Meghan Agosta lay on her back just inside the blue-line, sipping from a can of beer and looking up at the ceiling lights five storeys above her, just savouring the moment.

    Some climbed aboard the ice-surfacing machine to have their pictures taken. Others posed at centre ice with their gold medals.

    Steve Keogh, a spokesman for the COC, said the organization had not provided the alcohol or initiated the party.

    "In terms of the actual celebration, it's not exactly something uncommon in Canada," he said. "If these athletes were of legal age, then it's not something that's against the law. We can understand there's a lot of sensitivity around celebrations.
    "We condone celebrations. ... We don't condone actions of irresponsibility. I think Canadians understand it's quite an emotional moment for our team. It was not our intention to go against any IOC protocols."

    Feb 26. 2010
    CTV News with files from The Associated Press
    http://www.ctvolympics.ca/hockey/news/newsid=52689.html#team+canada+apologizes+post+game+behaviour
  6. Yail Bloor
    As proud as I am of our women's victory, and normally, believe me, I'm the last guy to frown on such behaviour, but I can see the issue here. I work as a silk-screen printer and just last week I printed shirts for an elementry school sporting the logo "-----(School name)* believes in -----(Women's team player)*". To think that just days later the children who idolized our athletes enough to wear there names on there school shirts watched these women smoking cigars and drinking just doesn't seem right to me..... Ugh, honestly, I almost feel dirty saying this because, like I said, I'm the last guy to take this stand normally, but the women's teams behavior just doesn't sit right with me (for the record, I'd feel the same if it were the mens team and I just printed shirts with one of there names on it).

    *Names withheld in the interest of privacy
  7. Motorhead
    IOC downplays Canada's medal celebration

    An International Olympic Committee spokesman did his best Friday to downplay the beer and cigars celebration from the Canadian women's hockey team after their gold medal victory.

    Mark Adams said that the IOC is writing Canadian Olympic officials a letter asking for further details of what happened, but said to "characterize it as an investigation would be wrong."

    Pictures of the players partying on the ice following their 2-0 triumph over the U.S. at Canada Hockey Place Thursday. The team, which includes 18-year-old Marie-Philip Poulin, issued an apology via press release soon after.

    "We hear all sorts of stories, and we see the pictures obviously...we'd just like to get an idea from them...what I would clearly say is that a very quick apology from the team looks to me to have drawn a line under it, but I can't fully say that until the letters have come back and we've finished the process," said Adams.

    When pushed on the issue, Adams went on to say, "people are in search of a story that doesn't exist...they're looking for someone to say it's terrible."

    Drinking age in B.C. is 19. It's 18 in Alberta, where the Canadian team has been based for the past six months.

    The team has a press conference slated for later Friday.

    Feb. 26, 2010
    Steve Ewen, Canwest Olympic Team
    Faceoff.com
    http://www.faceoff.com/story.html?id=b8f6ebb0-a2ff-4525-ba79-72b6f8455234
  8. twoiko
    I see nothing wrong with this at all...
  9. BloodyMuffin
    This really seems like a non issue... why do we hold athletes to higher standards in the first place anyway? they're no different except for their skills. i'm sure many a child has watched their parent celebrate a victory of some sort in a fashion much worse than this. of course if its not the children they're worried about then i fail to see who actually cares... nobody is harmed by it, it was a completely normal celebration, it wasnt even in that weird a location...
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