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IT consultant Jeremy Detheridge's 'cat and mouse' drugs game (RC vendor prosecution)

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  1. Terrapinzflyer
    A businessman registered EIGHT internet companies from his Broadstairs home - in a "cat and mouse" drugs game over legal highs.

    Jeremy Detheridge, 26, imported chemicals from China disguised as lawn feed-based products that he traded online.

    But Canterbury Crown Court said in April 2010 new regulations were introduced to outlaw some of the drugs.

    And in what is believed to be one of the first prosecutions of its kind in the UK, Detheridge, now of Devonshire Gardens, Ramsgate, pleaded guilty to five charges of possessing and importing half a kilo of illegal class B and C drugs. He will be sentenced next week.

    Donal Lawler, defending, said the IT consultant admitted he had been playing "cat and mouse" with drug enforcement officers to bring in drugs that were still legal.

    But Judge Adele Williams said the "mischief" in the clandestine importations was that Detheridge had no idea what the powders contained.

    "He didn't know what effect they could have on the people he was supplying them to," he said. "They could have been substances which turned out to be lethal. He didn't know."

    Paul Tapsell, prosecuting, told how on April 19, 2010 two packages were intercepted at Stansted airport from a "Jack Ma, China" and addressed to David Saunders in Botany Road, Broadstairs.

    Forensic experts tested the powder and discovered they contained a substance used to treat neurodegerative disorders along with an illegal cass C substance.

    Three days later, another package arrived at Heathrow from "Shanghai Yiyi Maoyi Co, China" and addressed to David Saunders - this time with Titanium Dioxide inside.

    In May, another package was tested and it contained a class B drug.

    Customs officers began investigating Detheridge and discovered a company called "Naturally Perfected" based at Broadstairs - with a contact address at a Ramsgate pub.

    Police then raided the house in Botany Road, Broadstairs - seizing books on legal highs, including instructions for manufacturing various drugs, scales, measuring spoons and a computer.

    And as officers were still carrying out their raid - ANOTHER package arrived by courier for Detheridge.

    That led officers to websites for Perfectpowder.co.uk and happyKat.co.uk - but both carried a notice that orders weren't being taken as "they were away at Glastonbury". They were two of eight companies that he had registered online.

    The court heard that the value of the drugs was £40,000 - and Detheridge claimed that "he didn't know how the products he sold were used, but assumed his customers already knew", the prosecutor said.

    Mr Lawler told the court: "He thought he was winning the cat and mouse game and staying on the right side of the law.

    "He is not a cynical or callous businessman - whatever the dubious moral arguments are over the supply of legal highs - selling them regardless of the consequences. He took them himself at the time. Although he has now stopped.

    "He realises that he flew too close to the sun and got burned. He is a man who accepts he strayed but there was no malicious intent."

    A second man, David Truelove, 40, of Rumsfields Road, Broadstairs admitted two charges of possessing cannabis. He will also be sentenced next week.




    by Paul Hooper
    Thursday, February 09 2012

    http://www.kentonline.co.uk/kentonline/news/2012/february/9/cat_and_mouse.aspx

Comments

  1. Alfa
    Re: IT consultant Jeremy Detheridge's 'cat and mouse' drugs game

    This is highly interesting, as this seems the first research chemical vendor prosecution in the UK. I wonder what the outcome will be. More than a few UK companies sold mislabeled research chemicals without knowing that these contained controlled substances.
  2. Phenoxide
    Re: IT consultant Jeremy Detheridge's 'cat and mouse' drugs game (RC vendor prosecuti

    It's been very quiet but I'd be surprised if more such prosecutions don't follow. He's the tip of the iceberg for sure, as many other vendors will have knowingly or unknowingly been importing controlled substances over the past few years.

    Couldn't help but laugh at the shipment of titanium dioxide though. I wonder what stupid brand name that got sold under to some poor saps?

    Just a severely stupid one then? Selling total unknowns procured from some shady Far East link knowing that people are going to consume them seems pretty callous to me. A businessman who actually cared would have ensured quality control of his products. That's part of the problem with the RC boom.. the market share now goes to the IT "consultants" with their flashy websites and net savvy rather than people with the knowledge, training and wit to manage chemical wholesale competently.

    And as for not being cynical I think this quote pops that balloon:

    Course he didn't. *wink wink*

    That'd maybe seem less ridiculous if he hadn't also admitted to consuming the substances himself.
  3. Terrapinzflyer
    Re: IT consultant Jeremy Detheridge's 'cat and mouse' drugs game (RC vendor prosecuti

    Man jailed for importing drugs from China

    A businessman who ran eight internet drug companies from his Broadstairs home dealing in importing "legal highs" from China was today jailed for three years.

    Jeremy Detheridge, 26, brought in the chemicals disguised as lawn feed-based products in a "cat and mouse" game with the authorities.

    But Canterbury Crown Court heard that in April 2010 new regulations were introduced that outlawed the drugs.

    And, in what is believed to be one of the first prosecutions of its kind in the UK, Detheridge, now of Devonshire Gardens, Ramsgate, pleaded guilty to importing illegal class B and C drugs with intent to supply.

    Judge Adele Williams told him: "You thought you were ordering non-controlled drugs but they turned out to be controlled.

    "But you are not a chemist. You weren't to know what was in the drugs you imported from China. That's the mischief."

    Donal Lawler, defending, said the IT consultant admitted he had been playing "cat and mouse" with drug enforcement officers to bring in drugs that were still legal.

    Paul Tapsell, prosecuting, told how on April 19, 2010 two packages were intercepted at Stansted airport from a "Jack Ma, China" and addressed to "David Saunders, Kingsgate Marketing".

    Forensic experts tested the powder and discovered they contained a substance used to treat neurodegenerative disorders along with an illegal class C substance.

    Three days later another package arrived at Heathrow airport from "Shanghai Yiyi Maoyi Co, China" and addressed to David Saunders - this time with Titanium Dioxide inside.

    In May, another package was tested and it contained a class B drug.

    Customs officers began investigating Detheridge and discovered a company called "Naturally Perfected" based at Broadstairs - with a contact address at a Ramsgate pub.

    Police then raided the house in Botany Road, Broadstairs - seizing books on legal highs, including instructions for manufacturing various drugs, scales, measuring spoons and a computer.

    And as officers were still carrying out their raid - another package arrived for Detheridge.

    That led officers to websites for Perfectpowder.co.uk and happyKat.co.uk - but both carried a notice that orders weren't being taken as "they were away at Glastonbury".

    The court heard that the value of the drugs was £40,000 - and Detheridge claimed that "he didn't know how the products he sold were used, but assumed his customers already knew", the prosecutor said.

    Mr Lawler told the court: "He thought he was winning the cat and mouse game and staying on the right side of the law.

    "He is not a cynical or callous businessman - whatever the dubious moral arguments are over the supply of legal highs - selling them regardless of the consequences. He took them himself at the time. Although he has now stopped.

    "He realises that he flew too close to the sun and got burned. He is a man who accepts he strayed but there was no malicious intent."

    A second man, David Truelove, 40, of Rumsfields Road, Broadstairs, admitted two charges of possessing cannabis and was fined £300 with £515 costs and surcharge.


    Monday, February 13 2012
    by Paul Hooper

    http://www.kentonline.co.uk/kentonline/news/2012/february/13/drugs_importer_jailed.aspx
  4. radiometer
    Re: IT consultant Jeremy Detheridge's 'cat and mouse' drugs game (RC vendor prosecuti

    My guess would be that the titanium dioxide was being used as a cut/filler.
  5. Pondlife
    Re: IT consultant Jeremy Detheridge's 'cat and mouse' drugs game (RC vendor prosecuti

    Although there's a lot of talk about "cat and mouse", it seems he was prosecuted for controlled drugs - Class B and Class C according to the article.

    The "legal high" and RC elements to this case seem to be secondary to the prosecution. Although I'm sure the "cynical" behaviour and large stocks of (presumably legal) RCs didn't help his mitigation, it's the Class B and Class C drugs that landed him in chokey.
  6. Insomniacsdream
    Re: IT consultant Jeremy Detheridge's 'cat and mouse' drugs game (RC vendor prosecuti

    I bet you he was selling mislabeled cathinones and saying the product that he was selling was 99.8% pure and legal when never performing tests himself. I consider mislabeling drugs to be far more criminal then selling a class b drug.
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