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Jay, Joe bill intends to reclassify hydrocodone painkillers

By gal68, Apr 3, 2013 | Updated: Apr 5, 2013 | | |
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  1. gal68
    [imgl=white]http://whatishydrocodone.net/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/hydrocodone-side-effects.jpg[/imgl]CHARLESTON, W.Va. -- A proposed "Safe Prescribing Act of 2013" sponsored by West Virginia's senators will reclassify hydrocodone painkillers, including Vicodin and Lortab, from Schedule III to Schedule II controlled substances, reflecting their high potential for addiction and abuse.

    Sen. Joe Manchin and Jay Rockefeller, both D-W.Va., are original co-sponsors of the bipartisan legislation introduced in both the Senate and House to fight prescription drug abuse by tightening restrictions on some of the most addictive narcotics.

    "We got the bill passed through the Senate last year, but we did not get it through the House," Manchin said during a telephone interview with the Gazette.

    After he spoke before an advisory committee of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in Maryland in January, Manchin said 19 out of 29 committee members voted in favor of making hydrocodone a Schedule II drug.

    Emergency room visits related to hydrocodone abuse rose from 38,000 to 115,000 between 2004 and 2010. Hydrocodone drugs are now the most widely prescribed painkillers in the country.
    Prescriptions for Schedule II drugs can be issued for only 30 days. A physician will be allowed to give a patient three 30-day prescriptions at one time. But after that, the patient must go back to the physician's office to get prescriptions renewed.

    "If you still have that much pain after 90 days, you should see a doctor to see if something else is wrong," Manchin said. "Those who really need the pills will only have to go back four times a year under the new law.

    "What we are doing will shut down doctors who have been irresponsible in giving prescriptions out like candy, helping people become addicted."
    Some people with hydrocodone prescriptions, Manchin added, regularly sell the pills illegally to other people.


    March 20, 2013
    By Paul J. Nyden
    http://www.wvgazette.com/News/201303200123
    The Charleston Gazette


    For me, seems the government wants to control everything. I love the comment about how if pain persists for longer then 90 days there must be something more going on. So now the government is trained and obviously knows each one of us, and that certainly we all must abuse this medication. Love the part where the author also states that the physicians are helping people become addicted.

    Ha, it is possible to abuse ANY substance. There will always be people who sell them, and always people who will abuse them. As a health professional I for one have been trained to treat everyone equally, and we cannot pass judgment on any one else's pain. Pain is subjective and will always be based on what the person says and feels it is to them.

    Any thoughts?? Me, makes me a little sick to my stomach.


    I apologize if this article isn't in the correct section, this was my first post and I am still learning how to do this, I think with some practice I can get it down. Thanks for your patience and all of your responses.

Comments

  1. babalooj
    Re: Jay Joe Bill to reclassify painkillers

    I totally agree with you, in that we should be allowed to consume the substances we choose,
    and any advantage in law for my favor (whether it makes sense or not) is good
    But, i feel that it doesn't make sense that any opioids are classed differently.
    Hydrocodone is just as abusable as other opioids that are in schedule two, such as oxycodone and morphine,
    and it doesn't make any sense to say hydrocodone is less likely to be abused or cause addiction.

    Again, its not that i agree with these laws, it is just what they are, and they should at least mean what they say
  2. gal68
    Re: Jay Joe Bill to reclassify painkillers

    Hi BB thanks for your reply. I completely agree with you when it comes to the abuse potential and the addiction potential. Hydrocodone is no different. I do think that other opiods are stronger then hydrocodone such as oxy and morphine, fentanyl, you get the picture here.

    I see acetaminophen with codiene as another drug similar to hydrocodone. A bit stronger then just APAP but also the abuse potential is the same as any other opioid, for me anyways.

    Thanks for the feedback! Curious to see where things end up.
  3. Moving Pictures
    Re: Jay Joe Bill to reclassify painkillers

    The reason hydrocodone is schedule III is because of the acetaminophen in it. It is also considered less potent that oxycodone (all oxycodone preparations are schedule II including percocet). It being schedule III makes it easier for doctors to prescribe than a class II drug. If it is moved to class II, there will be far less prescriptions written for it. Doctors are scared now a days. They don't want to write anything because they are afraid of going under review by the DEA and shit. These laws are bullshit.

    Personally, and I know people will disagree with me, but we need more heroin in America. People need to stop abusing these painkillers so much and just go with heroin. I mean, if you're already shooting hydromorphone and oxycodone, you might as well be shooting dope. It's really the same thing. If people moved to heroin, there would be less painkiller abuse and doctors would be more comfortable with writing scripts for people who legit need them.

    Oh, and if it is moved to schedule II, everyone needs to get ready for a bullshit tramadol 'script. That's the new thing, doctors will give you a ton of tramadol but no hydrocodone. Tram is weak as shit and it's extremely dangerous to abuse.
  4. gal68
    Re: Jay Joe Bill to reclassify painkillers

    MP, thanks for the input, I should know this stuff but I really on tried an Oxy once, got violently sick, and since have only used the hydrocodone. Very useful info.

    I want to add to your comment about the Heroin. I have not ever used it so I have no personal take on the drug. I do see where you are going with having more of it. Now that MJ is legal in Colorado, I really see how people can benefit. Why not let them buy it legally? We take our own risks anyways, seems a simple waiver could take care of that. The gov't could profit from the millions and billions they are missing out on, and those who want to can use all they want.

    People will do what they want to anyways. Trying to hinder someone just makes them want to do it more.

    On the tramadol, absolutely agree with you...worthless drug, so much health risks involved, seizure land here we come. And when people can't reach the relief they need, they will take it and take it and eventually thats when the bad things happen.
  5. talltom
    I'll be very annoyed if Vicodin is made a schedule II. I need to use it for chronic pain. Currently my doctor can prescribe it with two refills and I can call in the refills. If it's changed to schedule II I'll have to go to her office each time I need a refill and get a written script. Not only will that be inconvenient, it will cost more because she will charge me for the visit. I may as well get the hydrocodone without acetaminophen since that's already schedule II and the acetaminophen is more dangerous to the liver than the hydrcodone.
  6. al-k-mist
    I too use hydrocodone for chronic pain. I get 100mg a day and it doesnt do the trick, but even less oxycodone makes me too tired or drugged feeling to work on the farrrm. so i went back down to hydros, and the SURGEON only limits it to 100mg because of the APAP, and it says that on the bottle(no more than 3250 mg from any source).
    having a fairly basic but thourough understanding of the contolled substance statutes, it doesnt make any sense for there to be NO non- CII opiates. no leeway

    a clown ass bill like that, while possibly motivated by a positive emotion and a desire to do right , will be more detrimental than positive...more paib caused than stopped
  7. dyingtomorrow
    Re: Jay Joe Bill to reclassify painkillers

    Haha, well stated.

    The nice thing about economics is that it is almost an inviolable law of reality (unless you are prepared to live in a 3rd world / Totalitarian / 1984 Nightmare-ocracy, because it is worth the tradeoff to you, to make sure someone out there isn't feeling "too good"). If they do end up making Vicodins Schedule II, and keep kicking people off pain meds, the heroin supply will naturally increase on its own, to match the demand for illegal opiates which the U.S. government seems hellbent on increasing.

    The idiocy of our drug policy really makes you wonder if these politicians are intentionally TRYING to economically, socially, and culturally destroy the U.S. With the help of the dipshit media who writes articles like this, of course.
  8. hookedonhelping
    I doubt this will pass. Those who lobby for the pharmaceutical industry will not like this bill very much. I can't even fathom how much money they stand to lose if this bill is passed.

    On a brighter note, marijuana polls show that 52% of the country is in favor of it's legalization and to be perfectly honest, if I had a choice between using THC/CBD or Hydrocodone to alleviate my lower back pain, I would go with THC/CBD.

    They say marijuana is a gateway drug to "harder drugs" like heroin. I think Lortab is more of a gateway drug than marijuana will ever be. THC doesn't cause you to go through withdrawals requiring you to spend the majority of 72 hours in the bathroom shitting your brains out. THC doesn't make you psychically sick until you get some more THC in your system.

    Despite these facts, making Hydrocodone a schedule II substance is not justified in my mind. The drug, which does help alleviate pain, is a necessary substance in many peoples diets. It's not "healthy" mind you, but when your faced with chronic pain issues it is a gift from the Gods when other natural options are not an option; ie, THC.

    If you choose to abuse Hydrocodone so you can get high from it, then accept the consequences of a miserable withdrawal process. Also understand that it is a matter of time before you are climbing the schedule ladder and using Oxy's or Heroin.

    Placing this medication on the same schedule as Oxy's or Fentanyl is not something I foresee being a reality. I suppose time will tell.
  9. NastyNate
    If it makes you feel good, its bad. Tramadol isn't scedule II and it is much, much worse for your body. Doctors are quick to prescribe that though because the government doesn't need too many of us regular middle/lower class people running around so they'll do just enough to kill about half of us off. If you let a young man who wants money listen to hip-hop where all they talk about is robbing and selling drugs, he's going to rob and sell drugs. If you make it easier for hydrocodone users to get it illegally rather than legally, chances are they'll get it illegally.
  10. quickiB
    I think a lot o people here are making the mistake of taking for granted the tovernments though processes with regard to potential for harm and benefit/risk assesment. Te government wants to make more dangerous substances easier to get than substances that have a high potential to...you guessed it, make you high; and a low/nonesxistent chance to physically/mentally harm you in a profound way. For example, the reason that things like vicodin are in CIII is because relative to their euphoric effects, it is much easier to kill yourself with than oxy or dilaudid. Nobody here can deny that acetaminophen is much more harmful and life-threatening in hypertherapeutic doses than opioids. Opioids only clinically-significant hazard (respiratory depression) is muh less likely (especially with hydrocodone) to damage or kill you than tylenol or the 'NSAIDs, which have all kinds of associated dangers. Benzodiazepines are some of the most addicive and neurologically damaging drugs, yet they are in cIV, making the exact k
  11. quickiB
    I think a lot o people here are making the mistake of taking for granted the tovernments though processes with regard to potential for harm and benefit/risk assesment. Te government wants to make more dangerous substances easier to get than substances that have a high potential to...you guessed it, make you high; and a low/nonesxistent chance to physically/mentally harm you in a profound way. For example, the reason that things like vicodin are in CIII is because relative to their euphoric effects, it is much easier to kill yourself with than oxy or dilaudid. Nobody here can deny that acetaminophen is much more harmful and life-threatening in hypertherapeutic doses than opioids. Opioids only clinically-significant hazard (respiratory depression) is muh less likely (especially with hydrocodone) to damage or kill you than tylenol or the 'NSAIDs, which have all kinds of associated dangers. Benzodiazepines are some of the most addicive and neurologically damaging drugs, yet they are in cIV, making the exact kInd of over-prescribing everyone worries about with narcotics, drugs that are much less damaging than them. Another benefit of having bullshit compound meds are that any death that happens while on them can be blamed entirely on the narcotic component however miniscule. The government enaures that people will die on these mexs because they assume everyone values and educate themselves to the same standards they do.
  12. Moving Pictures
    I disagree. While acetaminophen can be very damaging to the liver, most healthy adults could probably eat a whole bottle of Tylenol and not damage themselves (don't do this). NSAIDs become dangerous with chronic high dose use. On the other hand, one time of taking too much opiates can kill you.
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