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  1. Balzafire
    Could the Krokodil Drug Epidemic Poison America?

    Chances are you haven’t heard of krokodil.

    If you do a quick Google search you’ll learn it means crocodile in Russian, it used to be the name of a 20th century Soviet magazine, and you might come across one TIME magazine article and a disturbing video of how it’s also a very dangerous drug growing into an epidemic in Russia.

    The name krokodil comes from its trademark side effect: scaly green skin like a crocodile around the injection site. TIME calls it “the dirty cousin of morphine,” because it’s three times cheaper than heroin and very easy to make, being that its main ingredient is codeine, a behind-the-counter drug that has sent many of America’s famous rap community to prison.

    The medical name of krokodil is desomorphine. A quick search for that will bring up graphic images of people with swollen faces, exposed bones and muscles and skin rotting off on any given body part.

    The reason the drug is so anatomically destructive is due to its mix-ins. Users stir in ingredients “including gasoline, paint thiner, hydrochloric acid, iodine and red phosphorus which they scrape from the striking pads on matchboxes,” reports TIME.

    The drug isn’t filtered before consumption, meaning the high amounts of industrial chemicals enter the body, each chemical destroying a different area: the endocrine system, bone tissue, the nervous system and the liver and kidneys. Circulation is disrupted so severely it often leads to the death of a person’s limbs which inevitably have to be amputated. “Non-healing ulcers appear on the body and a person literally rots alive,” notes one blog site, Shroomery.

    While you most likely haven’t heard of it and it doesn’t seem to be spreading around the States yet, krokodil is not new. It was originally concocted in America in the 1930s, but didn’t seem to really find its way into Siberia and Russia until 2002, where, by 2009, it has spread substantially.

    It seems to have caught on in particular regions in Russia that are remote, regions where winter lasts eight months out of the year and where “the young people are in a constant state of boredom,” says TIME. The youth drinks a lot and barely works—this sounding reminiscent of the conditions and high amount of alcoholism among Alaska’s population, a place Sarah Palin calls Russia’s next-door neighbor. Could it also be the bridge that brings krokodil over?

    What would happen if krokodil use grew in our society like it has in Russia, a country whose government plays almost no part in the rehabilitation system? It would enter our debate at a turbulent time for drug policy. States from Connecticut to California are considering sanctioning marijuana, and the Global Commission on Drug Policy advocated that all drugs be decriminalized worldwide, asserting the global war on drugs has failed.

    Meanwhile the Federal Government isn’t budging, insisting they’ll go over states’ heads to continue criminally prosecuting drug use.

    But would legalizing drugs really be enough?

    Depending on the price and potency, it seems inevitable that the youth in Russia who are already addicted to krokodil’s 30-minute high wouldn’t likely turn to drugs sold in stores in favor of their cheap, home-grown mixture, and likely neither would Americans.

    According to Reuters there are over 250 million illegal drug users, less than 10% of whom are addicted. For 90% of users legalizing would be a boon. But even though the Global Drug Policy’s recommendation to decriminalize includes replacing prison with rehabilitation for addicts, it seems inevitable that a certain number, like those mixing their own krokodil, would get marginalized out of the care system.

    If a seedy drug like krokodil does enter our society, it could be assumed that this level of addiction—whereby a person willfully injects paint thiner and iodine into their body—would go under the radar of the Global Commission on Drugs despite their attention to addicts.

    Addiction will never be addressed legislatively until governments can address the root of what causes it, in a medical—rather than criminal—capacity. Given that we’re nowhere close to even providing basic universal healthcare in this country, say nothing of rehab, we can only hope that the Russians addicted to krokodil can help themselves before hurting us.



    By Colleen Stufflebeem
    June 21, 2011
    http://www.deathandtaxesmag.com/107349/could-the-krokodil-drug-epidemic-poison-america/

Comments

  1. catseye
    A home-made heroin substitute is having a horrific effect on thousands of Russia's drug addicts


    Oleg glances furtively around him and, confident that nobody is watching, slips inside the entrance to a decaying Soviet-era block of flats, where Sasha is waiting for him. Ensconced in the dingy kitchen of one of the apartments, they empty the contents of a blue carrier bag that Oleg has brought with him – painkillers, iodine, lighter fluid, industrial cleaning oil, and an array of vials, syringes, and cooking implements.

    Half an hour later, after much boiling, distilling, mixing and shaking, what remains is a caramel-coloured gunge held in the end of a syringe, and the acrid smell of burnt iodine in the air. Sasha fixes a dirty needle to the syringe and looks for a vein in his bruised forearm. After some time, he finds a suitable place, and hands the syringe to Oleg, telling him to inject the fluid. He closes his eyes, and takes the hit.

    Russia has more heroin users than any other country in the world – up to two million, according to unofficial estimates. For most, their lot is a life of crime, stints in prison, probable contraction of HIV and hepatitis C, and an early death. As efforts to stem the flow of Afghan heroin into Russia bring some limited success, and the street price of the drug goes up, for those addicts who can't afford their next hit, an even more terrifying spectre has raised its head.

    The home-made drug that Oleg and Sasha inject is known as krokodil, or "crocodile". It is desomorphine, a synthetic opiate many times more powerful than heroin that is created from a complex chain of mixing and chemical reactions, which the addicts perform from memory several times a day. While heroin costs from £20 to £60 per dose, desomorphine can be "cooked" from codeine-based headache pills that cost £2 per pack, and other household ingredients available cheaply from the markets.

    It is a drug for the poor, and its effects are horrific. It was given its reptilian name because its poisonous ingredients quickly turn the skin scaly. Worse follows. Oleg and Sasha have not been using for long, but Oleg has rotting sores on the back of his neck.

    "If you miss the vein, that's an abscess straight away," says Sasha. Essentially, they are injecting poison directly into their flesh. One of their friends, in a neighbouring apartment block, is further down the line.

    "She won't go to hospital, she just keeps injecting. Her flesh is falling off and she can hardly move anymore," says Sasha. Photographs of late-stage krokodil addicts are disturbing in the extreme. Flesh goes grey and peels away to leave bones exposed. People literally rot to death.

    Russian heroin addicts first discovered how to make krokodil around four years ago, and there has been a steady rise in consumption, with a sudden peak in recent months. "Over the past five years, sales of codeine-based tablets have grown by dozens of times," says Viktor Ivanov, the head of Russia's Drug Control Agency. "It's pretty obvious that it's not because everyone has suddenly developed headaches."

    Heroin addiction kills 30,000 people per year in Russia – a third of global deaths from the drug – but now there is the added problem of krokodil. Mr Ivanov recalled a recent visit to a drug-treatment centre in Western Siberia. "They told me that two years ago almost all their drug users used heroin," said the drugs tsar. "Now, more than half of them are on desomorphine."

    He estimates that overall, around 5 per cent of Russian drug users are on krokodil and other home-made drugs, which works out at about 100,000 people. It's a huge, hidden epidemic – worse in the really isolated parts of Russia where supplies of heroin are patchy – but palpable even in cities such as Tver.

    It has a population of half a million, and is a couple of hours by train from Moscow, en route to St Petersburg. Its city centre, sat on the River Volga, is lined with pretty, Tsarist-era buildings, but the suburbs are miserable. People sit on cracked wooden benches in a weed-infested "park", gulping cans of Jaguar, an alcoholic energy drink. In the background, there are rows of crumbling apartment blocks. The shops and restaurants of Moscow are a world away; for a treat, people take the bus to the McDonald's by the train station.

    In the city's main drug treatment centre, Artyom Yegorov talks of the devastation that krokodil is causing. "Desomorphine causes the strongest levels of addiction, and is the hardest to cure," says the young doctor, sitting in a treatment room in the scruffy clinic, below a picture of Hugh Laurie as Dr House.

    "With heroin withdrawal, the main symptoms last for five to 10 days. After that there is still a big danger of relapse but the physical pain will be gone. With krokodil, the pain can last up to a month, and it's unbearable. They have to be injected with extremely strong tranquilisers just to keep them from passing out from the pain."

    Dr Yegorov says krokodil users are instantly identifiable because of their smell. "It's that smell of iodine that infuses all their clothes," he says. "There's no way to wash it out, all you can do is burn the clothes. Any flat that has been used as a krokodil cooking house is best forgotten about as a place to live. You'll never get that smell out of the flat."

    Addicts in Tver say they never have any problems buying the key ingredient for krokodil – codeine pills, which are sold without prescription. "Once I was trying to buy four packs, and the woman told me they could only sell two to any one person," recalls one, with a laugh. "So I bought two packs, then came back five minutes later and bought another two. Other than that, they never refuse to sell it to us, even though they know what we're going to do with it." The solution, to many, is obvious: ban the sale of codeine tablets, or at least make them prescription-only. But despite the authorities being aware of the problem for well over a year, nothing has been done.

    President Dmitry Medvedev has called for websites which explain how to make krokodil to be closed down, but he has not ordered the banning of the pills. Last month, a spokesman for the ministry of health said that there were plans to make codeine-based tablets available only on prescription, but that it was impossible to introduce the measure quickly. Opponents claim lobbying by pharmaceutical companies has caused the inaction.

    "A year ago we said that we need to introduce prescriptions," says Mr Ivanov. "These tablets don't cost much but the profit margins are high. Some pharmacies make up to 25 per cent of their profits from the sale of these tablets. It's not in the interests of pharmaceutical companies or pharmacies themselves to stop this, so the government needs to use its power to regulate their sale."

    In addition to krokodil, there are reports of drug users injecting other artificial mixes, and the latest street drug is tropicamide. Used as eye drops by ophthalmologists to dilate the pupils during eye examinations, Dr Yegorov says patients have no trouble getting hold of capsules of it for about £2 per vial. Injected, the drug has severe psychiatric effects and brings on suicidal feelings.

    "Addicts are being sold drugs by normal Russian women working in pharmacies, who know exactly what they'll be used for," said Yevgeny Roizman, an anti-drugs activist who was one of the first to talk publicly about the krokodil issue earlier this year. "Selling them to boys the same age as their own sons. Russians are killing Russians."

    Zhenya, quietly spoken and wearing dark glasses, agrees to tell his story while I sit in the back of his car in a lay-by on the outskirts of Tver. He managed to kick the habit, after spending weeks at a detox clinic ,experiencing horrendous withdrawal symptoms that included seizures, a 40-degree temperature and vomiting. He lost 14 teeth after his gums rotted away, and contracted hepatitis C.

    But his fate is essentially a miraculous escape – after all, he's still alive. Zhenya is from a small town outside Tver, and was a heroin addict for a decade before he moved onto krokodil a year ago. Of the ten friends he started injecting heroin with a decade ago, seven are dead.

    Unlike heroin, where the hit can last for several hours, a krokodil high only lasts between 90 minutes and two hours, says Zhenya. Given that the "cooking" process takes at least half an hour, being a krokodil addict is basically a full-time job.

    "I remember one day, we cooked for three days straight," says one of Zhenya's friends. "You don't sleep much when you're on krokodil, as you need to wake up every couple of hours for another hit. At the time we were cooking it at our place, and loads of people came round and pitched in. For three days we just kept on making it. By the end, we all staggered out yellow, exhausted and stinking of iodine."

    In Tver, most krokodil users inject the drug only when they run out of money for heroin. As soon as they earn or steal enough, they go back to heroin. In other more isolated regions of Russia, where heroin is more expensive and people are poorer, the problem is worse. People become full-time krokodil addicts, giving them a life expectancy of less than a year.

    Zhenya says every single addict he knows in his town has moved from heroin to krokodil, because it's cheaper and easier to get hold of. "You can feel how disgusting it is when you're doing it," he recalls. "You're dreaming of heroin, of something that feels clean and not like poison. But you can't afford it, so you keep doing the krokodil. Until you die."

    By Shaun Walker
    Wednesday, 22 June 2011
    REUTERS
    www.independent.co.uk

    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/europe/krokodil-the-drug-that-eats-junkies-2300787.html
  2. catseye
    Re: Could the Krokodil Drug Epidemic Poison America?

    Just posted a UK story on krokodil from todays news here...its interesting to watch this story evolve, albeit slowly.
    I'm disturbed by the level of scare-mongering and 'what-ifs' in the story above, and I've yet to see the TIME article they refer to. But there's no doubt that this crocodile shit is bad news :(
  3. 3.4-Empathy
    Is there a tek for making this? ;-)
  4. zerozerohero
    well, actually, that's not such a stupid question at all - the tek is easy to find and what is direly missed is a tek to clean that stuff easily and for little money, as that would definitely save a lot of lives and even more limbs. As opposed to what's said by journalists on that matter, the drug itself (desomorphine) is not responsible for the flesh rotting and other fun side effects, it is the chemicals and heavy metals still present in the poor-quality end-product that really harm people more than anything else.
  5. Meow Tse Dung
    My Cat's heard of this drug before, many times, but one thing he has never had an answer to is: is the desomorphine the substance that destroys the skin tissues or is contaminant to blame.


    Meow =^.^=
  6. drug-bot
    this is why russia needs to legalize methadone maintaince, highest heroin rates in the world and this nation has all maintaince treatments illegal.
  7. Ghetto_Chem
    Ya pretty sure that Desomorphine isn't the problem here. Why are these people not trying to even attempt a cleanup? Its pretty common practice, as far as swim knows, to clean up cooked substances in the US, everything from meth to mdma gets at least a halfway decent clean up. This sounds like they just cook it, extract it without cleanup, and shoot. Killer high literally.

    Anyone ever tried Desomorphine whether it was pure or some Krok?

    Peace
  8. John895
    Re: Could the Krokodil Drug Epidemic Poison America?

    There is always something new isn't there? Before this crocodile shit, a few weeks ago people were raving about oxidato. Before oxidato, there was meth, and before that, the crack cocaine "epidemic".

    There will always be new drugs hitting the scene, and its weird to see how surprised people are by it. It seems pointless to worry about krokodil, or it's pure form, desomorphine, because it is only a matter of time before a new drug is discovered that is more addictive and potent than it.
  9. Meow Tse Dung
    Would it really be inappropriate to do a "In Soviet Russia" Joke here? Because my Cat's got one.

    Anyway, all the new reports that I've read up to now give: gasoline, paint thiner, hydrochloric acid, iodine and red phosphorus as chemicals. Because the stuff isn't cleaned, that's rather crappy.
    Anyway, with this info, and the theoretical process explained before you could probably write up your own tek.

    Oh and by the way: "In Soviet Russia, Drug eat YOU!"...
    Meow =^.^=
  10. kailey_elise
    In other threads about the 'crocodile method' of desomorphine, I thought we'd sussed out that it's basically the same process as the RP/I method of making methamphetamine. Which still causes us to wonder, why is it so damn dirty? Meth doesn't make your flesh fall off when you inject it, and the only sores are usually from people who can't stop picking their skin.

    IIRC, wikipedia has an article on desomorphine people might be interested in reading. Additionally, doing a search here on drugs-forum for 'desomorphine' should bring up the other articles & discussions regarding this substance. For something apparently so easily made, there's very little info out there.

    ~Kailey
  11. kailey_elise
    Re: Could the Krokodil Drug Epidemic Poison America?

    Desomorphine via 'crocodile' will never become popular in the United States, for the simple reason that codeine is a prescription-only medication here.

    If I'm gonna go through the trouble of procuring prescription medications, it would probably be for morphine, hydromorphone or oxymorphone - hell, at the very least, hydrocodone! To go through all that effort to get codeine which then STILL needs to be chemistrified into a better drug, when Heroin and better prescription opioids are so easily available would be incredibly stupid & unproductive.

    Maybe in Canada, where they have OTC codeine, but even then, they also have access to "good" drugs; there isn't enough Heroin to go around for all the Russian Heroin addicts.

    Also, I thought desomorphine-by-way-of-codeine had been around in the Soviet Union countries longer than 10 years...

    A search for "desomorphine" on the forum will bring up more articles & discussion.

    ~Kailey
  12. trdofbeingtrd
    Re: Could the Krokodil Drug Epidemic Poison America?

    Kailey, I agree with you for the most part. I don't disagree with what you are saying at all but I don't have the faith in people being smart enough in other countries including the U.S. to NOT do this drug if it was introduced to the main stream. Please, don't get me wrong, your argument holds weight, more than mine, I just know that when you hear of people shooting up alcohol, soaking substances in house cleaner because they misunderstood directions on how to make their own _____, and people who will inhale computer duster (NO offense to anyone who has done this, I am NOT perfect myself), it's not exactly all that far off to have a drug like this do damage.

    The article does seem to be using scare tactics and I think it's a shame to soviet humans "can help themselves before hurting us" attitude is completely shitty. I understand that according (I honestly do not know) to the article, our soviet brothers/sisters do not have the fortunate health care that other countries have, that does not mean that concern should be more in a very improbable, but not impossible drug scare rather than towards helping those who do not have the luxury of health care like others have. I actually take offense to this article. Basically it says in other words "poor teens in Russia/Soviet, they have nothing to do and get high all the time, I just hope their fucked up way of living don't infect any of us (whoever in the hell "us" could be)".

    Sorry, I get the initial and I guess most important part of this article, that there is a really bad drug out there that COULD be a problem for people bad off enough to try and get hooked on it. It just seems that there is almost a bias in this article that is probably put out there as concern. No offense of course to you Ballz, it's a great find, and I am glad I read about it.
  13. VirtuallyEmotionless
    [IMGR="align=right"]http://www.drugs-forum.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=20888&stc=1&d=1308780519[/IMGR]Krokodil: The drug that eats junkies

    A home-made heroin substitute is having a horrific effect on thousands of Russia's drug addicts


    Oleg glances furtively around him and, confident that nobody is watching, slips inside the entrance to a decaying Soviet-era block of flats, where Sasha is waiting for him. Ensconced in the dingy kitchen of one of the apartments, they empty the contents of a blue carrier bag that Oleg has brought with him – painkillers, iodine, lighter fluid, industrial cleaning oil, and an array of vials, syringes, and cooking implements.

    Half an hour later, after much boiling, distilling, mixing and shaking, what remains is a caramel-coloured gunge held in the end of a syringe, and the acrid smell of burnt iodine in the air. Sasha fixes a dirty needle to the syringe and looks for a vein in his bruised forearm. After some time, he finds a suitable place, and hands the syringe to Oleg, telling him to inject the fluid. He closes his eyes, and takes the hit.

    Russia has more heroin users than any other country in the world – up to two million, according to unofficial estimates. For most, their lot is a life of crime, stints in prison, probable contraction of HIV and hepatitis C, and an early death. As efforts to stem the flow of Afghan heroin into Russia bring some limited success, and the street price of the drug goes up, for those addicts who can't afford their next hit, an even more terrifying spectre has raised its head.

    The home-made drug that Oleg and Sasha inject is known as krokodil, or "crocodile". It is desomorphine, a synthetic opiate many times more powerful than heroin that is created from a complex chain of mixing and chemical reactions, which the addicts perform from memory several times a day. While heroin costs from £20 to £60 per dose, desomorphine can be "cooked" from codeine-based headache pills that cost £2 per pack, and other household ingredients available cheaply from the markets.

    It is a drug for the poor, and its effects are horrific. It was given its reptilian name because its poisonous ingredients quickly turn the skin scaly. Worse follows. Oleg and Sasha have not been using for long, but Oleg has rotting sores on the back of his neck.

    "If you miss the vein, that's an abscess straight away," says Sasha. Essentially, they are injecting poison directly into their flesh. One of their friends, in a neighbouring apartment block, is further down the line.

    "She won't go to hospital, she just keeps injecting. Her flesh is falling off and she can hardly move anymore," says Sasha. Photographs of late-stage krokodil addicts are disturbing in the extreme. Flesh goes grey and peels away to leave bones exposed. People literally rot to death.

    Russian heroin addicts first discovered how to make krokodil around four years ago, and there has been a steady rise in consumption, with a sudden peak in recent months. "Over the past five years, sales of codeine-based tablets have grown by dozens of times," says Viktor Ivanov, the head of Russia's Drug Control Agency. "It's pretty obvious that it's not because everyone has suddenly developed headaches."

    Heroin addiction kills 30,000 people per year in Russia – a third of global deaths from the drug – but now there is the added problem of krokodil. Mr Ivanov recalled a recent visit to a drug-treatment centre in Western Siberia. "They told me that two years ago almost all their drug users used heroin," said the drugs tsar. "Now, more than half of them are on desomorphine."

    He estimates that overall, around 5 per cent of Russian drug users are on krokodil and other home-made drugs, which works out at about 100,000 people. It's a huge, hidden epidemic – worse in the really isolated parts of Russia where supplies of heroin are patchy – but palpable even in cities such as Tver.

    It has a population of half a million, and is a couple of hours by train from Moscow, en route to St Petersburg. Its city centre, sat on the River Volga, is lined with pretty, Tsarist-era buildings, but the suburbs are miserable. People sit on cracked wooden benches in a weed-infested "park", gulping cans of Jaguar, an alcoholic energy drink. In the background, there are rows of crumbling apartment blocks. The shops and restaurants of Moscow are a world away; for a treat, people take the bus to the McDonald's by the train station.

    In the city's main drug treatment centre, Artyom Yegorov talks of the devastation that krokodil is causing. "Desomorphine causes the strongest levels of addiction, and is the hardest to cure," says the young doctor, sitting in a treatment room in the scruffy clinic, below a picture of Hugh Laurie as Dr House.

    "With heroin withdrawal, the main symptoms last for five to 10 days. After that there is still a big danger of relapse but the physical pain will be gone. With krokodil, the pain can last up to a month, and it's unbearable. They have to be injected with extremely strong tranquilisers just to keep them from passing out from the pain."
    Dr Yegorov says krokodil users are instantly identifiable because of their smell. "It's that smell of iodine that infuses all their clothes," he says. "There's no way to wash it out, all you can do is burn the clothes. Any flat that has been used as a krokodil cooking house is best forgotten about as a place to live. You'll never get that smell out of the flat."

    Addicts in Tver say they never have any problems buying the key ingredient for krokodil – codeine pills, which are sold without prescription. "Once I was trying to buy four packs, and the woman told me they could only sell two to any one person," recalls one, with a laugh. "So I bought two packs, then came back five minutes later and bought another two. Other than that, they never refuse to sell it to us, even though they know what we're going to do with it." The solution, to many, is obvious: ban the sale of codeine tablets, or at least make them prescription-only. But despite the authorities being aware of the problem for well over a year, nothing has been done.

    President Dmitry Medvedev has called for websites which explain how to make krokodil to be closed down, but he has not ordered the banning of the pills. Last month, a spokesman for the ministry of health said that there were plans to make codeine-based tablets available only on prescription, but that it was impossible to introduce the measure quickly. Opponents claim lobbying by pharmaceutical companies has caused the inaction.

    "A year ago we said that we need to introduce prescriptions," says Mr Ivanov. "These tablets don't cost much but the profit margins are high. Some pharmacies make up to 25 per cent of their profits from the sale of these tablets. It's not in the interests of pharmaceutical companies or pharmacies themselves to stop this, so the government needs to use its power to regulate their sale."

    In addition to krokodil, there are reports of drug users injecting other artificial mixes, and the latest street drug is tropicamide. Used as eye drops by ophthalmologists to dilate the pupils during eye examinations, Dr Yegorov says patients have no trouble getting hold of capsules of it for about £2 per vial. Injected, the drug has severe psychiatric effects and brings on suicidal feelings.

    "Addicts are being sold drugs by normal Russian women working in pharmacies, who know exactly what they'll be used for," said Yevgeny Roizman, an anti-drugs activist who was one of the first to talk publicly about the krokodil issue earlier this year. "Selling them to boys the same age as their own sons. Russians are killing Russians."

    Zhenya, quietly spoken and wearing dark glasses, agrees to tell his story while I sit in the back of his car in a lay-by on the outskirts of Tver. He managed to kick the habit, after spending weeks at a detox clinic ,experiencing horrendous withdrawal symptoms that included seizures, a 40-degree temperature and vomiting. He lost 14 teeth after his gums rotted away, and contracted hepatitis C.

    But his fate is essentially a miraculous escape – after all, he's still alive. Zhenya is from a small town outside Tver, and was a heroin addict for a decade before he moved onto krokodil a year ago. Of the ten friends he started injecting heroin with a decade ago, seven are dead.

    Unlike heroin, where the hit can last for several hours, a krokodil high only lasts between 90 minutes and two hours, says Zhenya. Given that the "cooking" process takes at least half an hour, being a krokodil addict is basically a full-time job.
    "I remember one day, we cooked for three days straight," says one of Zhenya's friends. "You don't sleep much when you're on krokodil, as you need to wake up every couple of hours for another hit. At the time we were cooking it at our place, and loads of people came round and pitched in. For three days we just kept on making it. By the end, we all staggered out yellow, exhausted and stinking of iodine."
    In Tver, most krokodil users inject the drug only when they run out of money for heroin. As soon as they earn or steal enough, they go back to heroin. In other more isolated regions of Russia, where heroin is more expensive and people are poorer, the problem is worse. People become full-time krokodil addicts, giving them a life expectancy of less than a year.

    Zhenya says every single addict he knows in his town has moved from heroin to krokodil, because it's cheaper and easier to get hold of. "You can feel how disgusting it is when you're doing it," he recalls. "You're dreaming of heroin, of something that feels clean and not like poison. But you can't afford it, so you keep doing the krokodil. Until you die."

    Some of the names in this story have been changed



    Wednesday, 22 June 2011
    By Shaun Walker
    The Independant
    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/europe/krokodil-the-drug-that-eats-junkies-2300787.html
  14. kailey_elise
    Re: Could the Krokodil Drug Epidemic Poison America?

    Oh, I agree, if it were here people would probably do it. Hell, if someone had offered it to me when I was dopesick, I'd probably have done it. I would've held onto it until I was *really* sick, in case I could find something better, but I would've done it.

    I just don't think it will become a problem here because the precursors that make it so attractive in other places aren't as readily available here in the USA, as I said.

    My ex-husband ended up in detox for a combination of alcohol & computer duster. ;) It was the alcohol that got him in there, but he actually needed it for the duster. He'd been doing drugs that wouldn't trip his drug screen at his methadone clinic & started huffing 4-6 cans of duster a day, having seizures all over the damn place. He still has memory problems because of it & they actually made him go to the ER to get a work up before they'd let him into the detox, once they figured out what "duster" actually IS. It's so much more dangerous than people seem to realize - it's not just some cheaper version of nitrous oxide, kiddos!

    I digress, but I wouldn't be surprised by anything. ;)

    ~Kailey
  15. Terrapinzflyer
    Threads merged.


    Teks belong in the chemistry forum not in the general forum. Please keep specific discussion of teks to the appropriate forum.
  16. 3.4-Empathy
    I didn't actually ask for the tek in that post though. Just asked if there was one :p
  17. davestate
    I believe I posted one, it is in the chemistry forum.I will say it was not this method though, That ends all discussion of it here.
  18. VirtuallyEmotionless
    I was wondering why my thread didn't even get a single reply.... As always, keep up the good work, Balzafire.

    I can't see how anyone could do a drug with such horrific effects. It's probably the most sickening thing I have ever seen drug wise.
  19. Routemaster Flash
    Uh, did you actually read the articles? They clearly state that it's the chemicals used in the preparation and present as impurities that cause the damage, not the drug itself...don't be so quick to assume any given article about drugs is automatically lying.

  20. headfull0fstars
    The ninja disagrees very strongly with this statement. She isn't saying that no one would continue using krokodil if heroin and other opiates were legalized, but the it's sure would surely decline greatly. The article assumes that people would continue using it because it is 'cheap', but if heroin were legalized there would be no reason for it to remain so expensive. It's high price reflects the risk that goes into producing and distributing it as well as the fact that prices can be artificially inflated to suit those who are profitting from it. If heroin (and other opiates) were available legally the prices would probably be much more affordable.

    During prohibition the price of alcohol skyrocketed. "A careful consideration of price quotes in newspapers by Warburton suggests that prices in 1930 were approximately three times as high as pre-prohibition prices"(Miron 245). Currently, alcohol is a relatively affordable drug that many people consume on a daily basis without being financially ruined by its use.

    Furthermore, being able to get pure diacetlymorphine would be favored by addicts because they would be certain that they would be getting good quality product and not have to worry about possibly dangerous cutting agents. This was also a concern during prohibition and was a factor in the increase in alcohol consumption after it became legal again.

    It seems like a cop out to the ninja to say that legalization of drugs wouldn't be enough to stop the krokodil problem. Maybe some people would continue using it, but for the most part legal access to cleaner and safer opiates would undoubtably alleviate the problem and could make the difference between life and death for many users.

    <SOURCE>

    Alcohol Consumption During Prohibition
    Jeffrey A. Miron; Jeffrey Zwiebel
    The American Economic Review, Vol. 81, No. 2, Papers and Proceedings of the Hundred and
    Third Annual Meeting of the American Economic Association. (May, 1991), pp. 242-247.

    ----------------------
    I tried to upload my source as a pdf file but it wouldn't work. So I tried to include the link to the file and that didn't work either. Does anyone know what the problem is and how I can upload or link my source?
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