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  1. chillinwill
    The longer people use cannabis or marijuana, the more likely they are to experience hallucinations or delusions or to suffer psychosis, according to a study released Saturday.

    The study found that people who first used cannabis when they were aged 15 or younger were twice as likely to develop a "non-affective psychosis" -- which can include schizophrenia -- than those who had never used the drug.

    The research led by John McGrath from the University of Queensland in Australia was based on a survey of 3,801 people with an average age of 20.1 years, the US-based Archives of General Psychiatry reported.

    "Among all the participants, a longer duration since the first time they used cannabis was associated with multiple psychosis-related outcomes," the study said.

    Of the group, 17.7 percent reported using cannabis for three or fewer years, 16.2 percent for four to five years and 14.3 percent for six or more years.

    Sixty-five were diagnosed with "non-affective psychosis", such as schizophrenia, and 233 had at least one hallucination, the study said.

    "Individuals who had experienced hallucinations early in life were more likely to have used cannabis longer and to use it more frequently," it said.

    But the relationship between psychosis and cannabis use was complex, it said.

    People who were vulnerable to psychosis, in other words had isolated psychotic symptoms, "were more likely to commence cannabis use, which could then subsequently contribute to an increased risk of conversion to a non-affective psychotic disorder," the research said.

    The article said previous studies had also identified an association between cannabis use and psychosis but there were concerns that research had not adequately accounted for confounding variables.

    February 27, 2010
    AFP
    http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/article/ALeqM5idu_xz8MDQA2O-nVNq4zzkCEWvSg

Comments

  1. chillinwill
    Marijuana Use and a Chance of Increased Psychosis

    Marijuana Use and a Chance of Increased Psychosis. A study that was released on Saturday indicates a link between increased psychosis risk and pot usage. Cannabis has long been a recreational drug of choice, and there are many advocates who have been pushing for medical marijuana laws. On the other hand, the popular drug has many enemies that lobby strongly to keep the use of marijuana illegal.


    It’s important to note that pot is illegal in the United States. Even if a state allows medical marijuana use, the Federal laws indicate that such usage is illegal.

    Researchers have been studying the effects of marijuana use on the brain. They recently completed a study of 3,100 young adults averaging 20 years in age. Of the group, 14% admitted to smoking pot for five years or more, 16% admitted to using marijuana for four to five years, and 18% admitted use of the drug for 3 years or less.

    Out of the group, 65 had been diagnosed with mental illnesses such as schizophrenia, and 233 have had at least one instance of hallucinations.

    The results of the study are interesting. It was noted that “Compared with those who had never used cannabis, young adults who had six or more years since first use of cannabis were twice as likely to develop a non-affective psychosis and were four times as likely to have high scores on the Peters et al Delusions Inventory.”

    So, using marijuana causes mental illness? It’s not that simple. On the other hand, the study indicated that “those individuals who were vulnerable to psychosis were more likely to commence cannabis use, which could then subsequently contribute to an increased risk of conversion to a non-affective psychotic disorder.”

    This means that the marijuana-psychosis link falls within the proverbial question “which came first- the chicken or the egg.” Researchers noted that more research was needed to draw conclusions over whether or not cannabis usage causes mental illness.

    If a link from marijuana use to mental illness can be proven – that is, if researchers can conclude successfully that pot usage increases the risk of developing mental illness – you can expect some pretty strong arguments against medical marijuana use legislation.

    February 28, 2010
    CNM News Network
    http://cnmnewsnetwork.com/11344/marijuana-use-and-a-chance-of-increased-psychosis/
  2. ThirdEyeFloond
    Long-term cannabis use can double risk of psychosis

    [​IMG]

    7:50am EST

    By Kate Kelland

    LONDON (Reuters) - Young people who smoke cannabis or marijuana for six years or more are twice as likely to have psychotic episodes, hallucinations or delusions than people who have never used the drug, scientists said on Monday.


    The findings adds weight to previous research which linked psychosis with the drug -- particularly in its most potent form as "skunk" -- and will feed the debate about the level of controls over its use.

    Despite laws against it, up to 190 million people around the world use cannabis, according to United Nations estimates, equating to about 4 percent of the adult population.

    John McGrath of the Queensland Brain Institute in Australia studied more than 3,801 men and women born between 1981 and 1984 and followed them up after 21 years to ask about their cannabis use and assessed them for psychotic episodes. Around 18 percent reported using cannabis for three or fewer years, 16 percent for four to five years and 14 percent for six or more years.

    "Compared with those who had never used cannabis, young adults who had six or more years since first use of cannabis were twice as likely to develop a non-affective psychosis (such as schizophrenia)," McGrath wrote in a study published in the Archives of General Psychiatry journal.

    They were also four times as likely to have high scores in clinical tests of delusion, he wrote, and a so-called "dose-response" relationship showed that the longer the duration since first cannabis use, the higher the risk of psychosis-related symptoms.

    A study by British scientists last year suggested that people who smoke skunk, a potent form of cannabis, are almost seven times more likely to develop psychotic illnesses such as schizophrenia than those who smoke "hash" or cannabis resin.

    Previous studies had also suggested smoking cannabis can double the risk of psychosis, but the British study was the first to look specifically at skunk. Skunk has higher amounts of the psychoactive ingredient THC which can produce psychotic symptoms such as hallucinations, delusions and paranoia.

    McGrath said, however, that "the nature of the relationship between psychosis and cannabis use is by no means simple" and more research was needed to examine the mechanisms at work.

    As part of his study, McGrath and his team looked at links between cannabis use and psychotic symptoms among a group of 228 sibling pairs and found the association still held. This suggests other influences like genes or the environment were less likely to be responsible for the psychosis, they said.

    A international group of drug policy experts published a book earlier this year arguing that laws against cannabis have failed to cut its use but instead led to vast numbers of arrests for drug possession in countries like Britain, Switzerland and the United States, which cause social division and pointless government expense.

    (Editing by Myra MacDonald)

    http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSTRE6201LW20100301
  3. dante420
    did this study take into account that maybe those cannabis users also indulged in other drugs such as lsd or mushrooms. those would certainly cause you to hallucinate or maybe that the weed they had was laced. unless they do a study on the kids b4 they were to smoke weed and than have them smoke the same strand of marijuana each time would and than test their psychology would they get accurate results. there is so much room for error in this study.
  4. Mr. Mojo Risin
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