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  1. chillinwill
    Get your tie-dyed t-shirts ready. The 1960s are making a comeback.

    It seems psychedelic drugs like LSD, cannabis and Ecstasy just might really have some medicinal purposes after all. Scientists are looking to these drugs to help sufferers of anorexia nervosa, cluster headaches and chronic anxiety attacks.

    One 35-year-old British University lecturer says she relies on biannual doses of LSD to control her drinking problem. She credits LSD with increased self-confidence as well as the ability to stay smoke-free and sober.

    Too good to be true?

    Critics argue users are merely swapping one drug for another and chalk up the "cure" as nothing more than being too high to feel pain. "As a former drug user, it sounds like an excuse to get high," says former addict Leslie Durkin (whose name has been changed).

    But distinguished academics and widely respected institutions are giving drugs like LSD a closer look.

    Harvard medical school psychiatrist and researcher Dr. John Halpern discovered that nearly all of the 53 people with cluster headaches who took LSD, or psilocybin, the active compound in those trippy little mushrooms, experienced relief of their symptoms. Now Halpern is researching whether 2-Bromo-LSD, a non-psychedelic version, will produce the same pain-stopping results.

    The international appeal

    LSD is garnering attention as having medicinal purposes in international arenas, too. Scientists across the pond are exploring the benefits of LSD -- a phrase that warms the hearts of most hippies. And not to be outdone, Swiss researchers are using the drug in combination with psychotherapy to treat terminal patients experiencing end-of-life anxiety. "If you handle LSD with care, it isn't any more dangerous than other therapies," said Dr. Peter Glasser, the psychiatrist leading the Swiss trial.

    Nothing new

    LSD's purported benefits aren't a new concept. In the 1950s and 1960s, researchers explored possible uses of psychedelics--in some cases using them to treat anxiety, depression, and yes, ironically, addiction. But the mainstream backlash to the hallucinogen put a stop to the research in the more conservative 1970s.

    In the U.S., LSD is Schedule 1, according to the Controlled Substances Act of 1970. That makes it illegal to produce, possess or purchase it without a DEA license.

    Regardless of its legal status, psychedelics are offering many hope. "I've had cluster headaches for over 10 years. If my doctor prescribed it, I'd certainly be willing to try LSD," says Marina Baldwin, an advocate of legalizing medicinal use of recreational drugs.

    Even if LSD and other recreational drugs aren't legalized, scientists are hopeful that what they learn about how LSD works will lead to the development of similar, legal drug therapies.

    If your doctor suggested it, would you be willing to try LSD to treat a chronic condition? Do you think certain psychedelics should be legalized?

    Gina Roberts-Grey
    October 27, 2009
    Wallet Pop
    http://www.walletpop.com/blog/2009/10/27/lsd-a-cure-for-headaches/

Comments

  1. Crazy Insane Sanity
    Swim and I occasionally get migraines. They aren't cluster headaches, but they hurt like hell! Recently Swim got ballsy, knowing that psilocybin has been used to treat cluster headaches, and ate an 1/8 of some weak shrooms during the peak of one of his migraines. He started feeling a little anxious, as he thought for sure he was in for a bad trip...but to his surprise, when the effects started to take hold his migraine completely vanished. Swim felt so happy to be relieved that the rest of his mellow trip was fantastic.
  2. Greenport
    It seems like they've been doing research on this forever, but I never seem to see any results. Where are the trials with the 2-bromo-lsd?
  3. Eratosthenese
    It certainly seems like psychedelics could hold a whole variety of treatments. Not to mention ibogaine, which has been said to stop an opiate withdrawal in its tracks.
  4. Greenport
    There was a video a while back regarding opiate addicts going to brazil to partake in a DMT ritual to face their addiction ..and supposedly it worked very well! If it really does, swiM bets shrooms and other psychedelics could also help greatly with opiate addiction.

    However that will never happen in industrialized nations. The law doesn't like letting barriers melt o_O

    SwiM was reading some book ..pretty oddly written one..but there were a few descriptions of using LSD back in the 60s to cure cluster headaches and the like. It included a story about a guy who had serious cluster headaches and his friend administered a dose of LSD (back when it was legal) to cure him..and it apparently worked better than anything else this person had tried.
  5. Raoul duke420
    Yea swim knows a guy who apparently suffered real bad with migrane headaches since he was a kid, the way he tells it the meds they gave him only "kind of" worked. But since his first experiance on lsd his headaches completley disappeared.
  6. mindlikealaserbeam
    Here are SwiMindlikealaserbeam's comments:

    ARTICLE: "Get your tie-dyed t-shirts ready. The 1960s are making a comeback."

    RESPONSE: Swim doesn't know why muggles seem to think that acid died in the 60's or 70's, but ever since he was a teenager in the 1990's, there has never been a period of swim's life when LSD wasn't available. Furthermore, in his teenaged years, LSD was more accessible to him than ETOH.

    ARTICLE: "It seems psychedelic drugs like LSD, cannabis and Ecstasy just might really have some medicinal purposes after all. Scientists are looking to these drugs to help sufferers of anorexia nervosa, cluster headaches and chronic anxiety attacks."

    RESPONSE: Perhaps swim is old-fashioned, and swiy may feel free to call him out for this comment however swiy likes, but swim thinks this is positively rediculous. Swim is about 1 year away from graduating with a PhD in psychology, and he thinks that there is almost no way that any of these drugs could possibly have any therapeutic value in the treatment of anorexia or "chronic anxiety attacks". Swim assumes that, by "chronic anxiety attacks", the author is referring to panic attacks with or without agoraphobia. Regardless, the only drug among any of these that can consistently reduce anxiety rather than exacerbating it is MDMA, and this drug is unreasonable to use for treatment because it is so hard on the cardiovascular system and the immune system, and also because the desired effects cannot be sustained with regular use. If one were to take 100-150mg of MDMA once per day for 4 or 5 days (ALTHOUGH THIS IS NOT RECOMMENDED FOR ANYONE TO DO IT EVER) then one would see that after all of one's happy juices get spent, the drug just feels like cold, hard speed. Aside from MDMA, swimmers can tell swim until they are blue in the face that marijuana makes them feel calm and relaxed, but swim would counter that the tendency when stoned is for people to avoid any sort of anxiety-provoking situation. The paranoia that people sometimes associate with the marijuana experience is ANXIETY, swimmers. That scary feeling of unrest and worry is what ANXIETY feels like.

    All of these conversations aside, though worth having, aren't really relevant, though, because there is no way that the AMA or the APA will be convinced that any of these awesome, psychedelic drugs are a better "treatment of choice" than the synthetic pharmaceutical drugs that they're already shoving down all of our throats.

    Swim's opinion is that we don't need to hide behind some bs medicinal use argument to justify taking advantage of the many benefits of the psychedelic experience. These drugs have enriched his life, he is a better person BECAUSE he used these drugs, and he will go to the prison, the hospital, and the grave screaming this at the top of his lungs and never recanting.

    That doesn't mean that swim thinks these drugs should be legal or accessible to everyone, especially LSD. Some people can use a lot of drugs and never have a bad experience, but some others can have a bad experience that will hurt them for the rest of their life if they use just a little bit. It is difficult to predict, and swim would prefer not to justify it by saying that some people "just aren't ready". He doesn't quite know the answer there, but he's still glad he took LSD for the first time 10 years ago. He still doesn't regret it one bit today.


    ARTICLE: "Critics argue users are merely swapping one drug for another and chalk up the "cure" as nothing more than being too high to feel pain. "As a former drug user, it sounds like an excuse to get high," says former addict Leslie Durkin (whose name has been changed)."

    RESPONSE: As a current and lifetime drug user, it sounds to swim like this is something 12-steppers love to say, as if their recovery status could ever grant them some moral authority over the images of their former selves that they are always projecting onto current users.

    Swim doubts that using LSD 2x per year constitutes being too high to feel the pain. If anything, this would make swim more painfully aware of the circumstances in his life and the consequences of decisions he had made, actions he had taken and not taken. LSD has opened his eyes wider and made it difficult to ignore painful truths in whom he was pleased to gain a deeper understanding.

    ARTICLE: "And not to be outdone, Swiss researchers are using the drug in combination with psychotherapy to treat terminal patients experiencing end-of-life anxiety. "If you handle LSD with care, it isn't any more dangerous than other therapies," said Dr. Peter Glasser, the psychiatrist leading the Swiss trial."

    RESPONSE: Whatever.

    Swimindlikealaserbeam OUT.
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