1. Dear Drugs-Forum readers: We are a small non-profit that runs one of the most read drug information & addiction help websites in the world. We serve over 4 million readers per month, and have costs like all popular websites: servers, hosting, licenses and software. To protect our independence we do not run ads. We take no government funds. We run on donations which average $25. If everyone reading this would donate $5 then this fund raiser would be done in an hour. If Drugs-Forum is useful to you, take one minute to keep it online another year by donating whatever you can today. Donations are currently not sufficient to pay our bills and keep the site up. Your help is most welcome. Thank you.
    PLEASE HELP
  1. Terrapinzflyer
    Banning the drug mephedrone may not have deterred users of the former 'legal high', according to new research released.

    The research by Queen's University Belfast, part of a cross-border study on the use of the substance in Ireland, comes after mephedrone was outlawed earlier this year.

    The drug hit the headlines because it was legally available yet had been blamed for a series of deaths.

    The research was led by Dr Karen McElrath, who said: "This is one of the first studies into mephedrone use in Northern Ireland since it was made illegal earlier this year.

    "The findings suggest that the ban did not have a significant impact on those who already used mephedrone, at least during the two-month period that followed the ban."

    The interviews with 23 mephedrone users took place in May and June in the aftermath of the decision to ban the drug.

    The participants were aged 19 to 51, about half of whom (12) were female.

    The Queen's team said 19 of those who took part in the study were employed, and most occupations were affiliated with business, trades, the service industry or the public sector.

    Mephedrone was made illegal in the UK in April, and in the Republic in May this year.

    Dr McElrath said: "We are keen to develop this research further and to compare our results with a similar study conducted in Waterford prior to the ban on mephedrone in the Republic of Ireland in May 2010.



    Monday, 4 October 2010

    http://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/n...d/mephedrone-ban-has-not-worked-14965686.html

Comments

  1. Phenoxide
    Holy sample size. Drawing conclusions based on 23 people (no doubt some of whom come from the same social circle), only a month or two after the law change, and no follow-up? Poor, poor stuff.

    Even as pilot data to try and secure funding for the more thorough investigation they allude to, that's a pretty pathetic and underpowered attempt at a survey. They could've got more data than that if they'd gone out on the street with a clipboard for an hour or two on a Friday night. Meaningless. I wouldn't give them a penny more when the Independent Scientific Committee on Drugs (ISCD) is already well down the line in conducting their properly structured and detailed study of mephedrone use patterns and attitudes.
  2. Arthur Dent
    Now wait just a cotton-picking minute here! Are we being led to believe that banning a pharmacological substance has not reduced demand for that substance??

    Making a chemical illegal and trying to use that legislation to prevent people from deciding for themselves what substances they wish to introduce into their bodies has not worked? People are STILL taking it despite its illegality and clear public warnings that taking it will cause them to explode, grow three heads, and/or become Communists?

    I am shaken to my very core! What do we have to do to get through to these people??

    Oh well, I suppose we can always build some more prisons.
  3. Balzafire
    Researchers complete first studies of mephedrone drug ban in Northern Ireland

    [imgl=white]https://www.drugs-forum.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=17134&stc=1&d=1286290122[/imgl]Researchers at Queen's University Belfast have completed one of the first studies of mephedrone use in Northern Ireland since the drug was outlawed earlier this year. They found that the ban did not deter those mephedrone users surveyed from taking the substance.

    Interviews with 23 mephedrone users were completed during a two-month period (May and June 2010) following the legislation that made the drug illegal in the UK. Study participants were aged 19 to 51 years, around half of whom (12) were female. 19 of the 23 people who took part in the study were employed, and most occupations were affiliated with business, trades, the service industry or the public sector.

    The research was led by Dr Karen McElrath at Queen's School of Sociology, Social Policy and Social Work.

    The key findings from the study were: * 21 of the 23 study participants had used mephedrone after the ban.

    * Only one person was very much opposed to using the substance again.

    * Approximately half the sample preferred mephedrone to cocaine or ecstasy. Some had experienced negative effects, for example, sleeplessness, difficult comedowns and next-day depression, but these factors generally did not deter them from using the substance again.

    * None of those who took part in the research felt that 'legal highs' were safe simply because they were legal.

    * None of the study participants recalled an initial interest in using mephedrone because it had been legal. Rather, its legality before April 2010 meant that it was easier to access and cheaper than many illegal substances.

    * Prior to the ban, only three interviewees had purchased mephedrone from 'head shops' and four interviewees had purchased mephedrone from online suppliers. The majority tended to access mephedrone through friends or dealers.

    * The majority of interviewees had prior experience of taking ecstasy, amphetamine or cocaine.

    * During their most recent use of mephedrone, all the study participants had also consumed alcohol, although the timing and amount of alcohol varied.

    * During their most recent use of mephedrone, six of the 23 participants had used another psychoactive substance, other than alcohol.

    * During their most recent use of mephedrone, most participants had consumed between one-two grams of the drug, although half recalled bingeing on mephedrone, sharing upward of seven-eight grams with two to three other people.

    Dr McElrath said: "This is one of the first studies into mephedrone use in Northern Ireland since it was made illegal earlier this year. The findings suggest that the ban did not have a significant impact on those who already used mephedrone, at least during the two-month period that followed the ban. We are keen to develop this research further and to compare our results with a similar study conducted in Waterford prior to the ban on mephedrone in the Republic of Ireland in May 2010."

    The study was part of a cross-border research partnership with Marie Clare Van Hout at the Waterford Institute of Technology.


    Queen's University Belfast
    5. October 2010
    http://www.news-medical.net/news/20...-mephedrone-drug-ban-in-Northern-Ireland.aspx
To make a comment simply sign up and become a member!