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  1. chillinwill
    The mother of a medical student who died after taking a "legal high" drug said today that Government plans to ban it do not stretch far enough.

    Maryon Stewart said classifying Gamma-Butyrolactone (GBL) as a Class C drug "doesn't send the right warnings" to impressionable young people.

    Her daughter, Hester Stewart, 21, a University of Sussex student who was studying molecular medicine, died in Brighton, East Sussex, in April after taking GBL.

    It is banned in several countries, including the United States and Sweden, and is set to be classed as a controlled substance, along with other "legal highs", by the British Government tomorrow.

    But Mrs Stewart told GMTV: "I don't think it goes far enough. In America, it is a Schedule A, which is the equivalent of a Class A drug here.

    "Class C doesn't mean anything. It doesn't send the right warnings. What we need to do is educate young people because I have now come to realise that people as young as 11 are taking legal highs by the bucket-full.

    "They are having all sorts of awful side-effects but they don't realise because they think it is legal, it is safe."

    She added: "We have all this stuff flooding on to the market and we have no idea what's in it."

    An inquest into Miss Stewart's death in Brighton in July heard that she took GBL mixed with alcohol following an American football awards ceremony and was found dead in bed.

    A verdict of misadventure was recorded by Brighton and Hove Coroner Veronica Hamilton-Deeley.

    Mrs Stewart said today that, due to the lack of information about what is contained in "legal highs", she is launching a website to help improve people's understanding, at http://www.whatsinit.co.uk.

    She is also aiming to raise money for equipment to help analyse "legal high" drugs and assess their potential danger.

    "Some legal highs might be safe but there are others that can be heavily addictive," she told GMTV.

    "A study done in the last few weeks on taking Mephedrone found half got anxious and depressed, they got heavy nosebleeds, and they also got chest infections and breathing problems.

    "That's not what you want for your kids."

    Tom Pugh
    December 22, 2009
    Independent
    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/u...government-legal-high-drug-plans-1847587.html

Comments

  1. chillinwill
    Drug ban plans 'not enough'

    The mother of a medical student who died after taking a "legal high" drug has said that Government plans to ban it do not stretch far enough.

    Maryon Stewart said classifying Gamma-Butyrolactone (GBL) as a Class C drug "doesn't send the right warnings" to impressionable young people.

    Her daughter, Hester Stewart, 21, a University of Sussex student who was studying molecular medicine, died in Brighton, East Sussex, in April after taking GBL.

    It is banned in several countries, including the United States and Sweden, and is set to be classed as a controlled substance, along with other "legal highs", by the British Government on Wednesday.

    But Mrs Stewart told GMTV: "I don't think it goes far enough. In America, it is a Schedule A, which is the equivalent of a Class A drug here.

    "Class C doesn't mean anything. It doesn't send the right warnings. What we need to do is educate young people because I have now come to realise that people as young as 11 are taking legal highs by the bucket-full.

    "They are having all sorts of awful side-effects but they don't realise because they think it is legal, it is safe."

    She added: "We have all this stuff flooding on to the market and we have no idea what's in it."

    An inquest into Miss Stewart's death in Brighton in July heard that she took GBL mixed with alcohol following an American football awards ceremony and was found dead in bed.

    A verdict of misadventure was recorded by Brighton and Hove Coroner Veronica Hamilton-Deeley.

    Press Association
    December 22, 2009
    http://www.google.com/hostednews/ukpress/article/ALeqM5ivbc1MQvmgXtPfsay7T80FeYUTrw
  2. NeuroChi
    I just went to her website and decided to take the survey that is posted on
    the font page. The 4th question asks: "What legal high's have you taken?" and
    then lists MDMA as one of the options. Lmao. Yeah, "Know your substance alright".
  3. divinemomentsoftruth
    This lady is off her rocker. What is she going to accomplish by raising money to analyze legal highs? To tell us what we already know? It's no secret that there's JWH-xxx on spice and other smoke blends, and that GBL is dangerous when mixed with alcohol (see Hester Stewart "in loving memory" from her website). There's plenty of great harm reducing information out there already, most people just don't take the time to inform themselves. God knows SWIM wouldn't touch a new drug with out reading about it first, and having the most certainty that the drug he thinks he's doing is infact what he's doing. Sometimes it can be hard because you can never know for certain without following the substance from synthesis. that's where knowing your source comes in. "Strangers always have the best candy".:rolleyes: SWIM cringes at the idea of some ass shoveling down vast quantities of some unknown chemical, that just so happens to be mephedrone ending up in the hospital with blue limbs and the whole "oooh i didnt know what it was, I was told its legal, legal means safe right?" FUCK. Know your Body - Know your Mind - Know your Substance - Know your Source.

    By the way SWIM wants to know what country her survey is for so he can enjoy the legal MDMA, skunk and magic mushrooms before it's too late :laugh:
  4. Seaquake
    what I can't believe is that TICTAC/The Analytical unit at St. Georges needs donations to get a GC/MS and a FTIR
  5. chillinwill
    Government 'Delinquent' Over Legal Highs
    [IMGR="red"]http://www.drugs-forum.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=12156&stc=1&d=1261533952[/IMGR]
    The mother of a medical student, who died after taking the party drug GBL, has criticised Government efforts to tackle the problem of so called "legal highs".

    From today, GBL and several other substances have been outlawed.

    But Maryon Stewart, who launched a campaign to ban all legal highs in the wake of her daughter's death, has told Sky News the move does not go nearly far enough.

    She said classifying Gamma-Butyrolactone (GBL) as a Class C drug "doesn't send the right warnings" to impressionable young people.

    "In America, it is a Schedule A, which is the equivalent of a Class A drug here," she said.

    "Class C doesn't mean anything. What we need to do is educate young people because I have now come to realise that people as young as 11 are taking legal highs by the bucket-full.

    "They are having all sorts of awful side-effects but they don't realise because they think it is legal, it is safe."

    Mrs Stewart is also angry that only a few legal highs have been prohibited: "I think the Home Office is actually delinquent to be perfectly honest.

    "I think they are paying lip-service to this whole issue. I think they have underestimated the number of people that are consuming these substances."

    Her daughter, Hester Stewart, 21, a University of Sussex student who was studying molecular medicine, died in Brighton, East Sussex, in April after taking GBL at a party.
    [IMGL="red"]http://www.drugs-forum.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=12157&stc=1&d=1261533952[/IMGL]
    Although GBL has been touted by drug dealers as a legal high, and relatively harmless, it is a key ingredient in paint stripper and rust remover - and if mixed with alcohol, it is potentially deadly.

    The changes to the law announced by the Home Office reclassify GBL as an illegal Class C drug.

    Another popular party drug, BZP, which is a stimulant - similar to amphetamine - is now also a Class C drug.

    Synthetic cannabinoids - man-made chemicals sprayed on herbal smoking products such as 'spice', which act on the body in a similar way to cannabis, are now controlled as Class B drugs alongside cannabis.

    The Home Secretary has rejected claims he is not moving fast enough to deal with the problem.

    Alan Johnson said: "We are cracking down on so called "legal highs" which are an emerging threat, particularly to young people.

    "That is why we are making a range of these substances illegal from today with ground- breaking legislation which will also ban their related compounds.

    "We are sending out a clear message to anyone who is thinking about experimenting with them, particularly over the festive period, that not only are they putting themselves in danger they will also be breaking the law."

    A Home Office spokesman also confirmed that they were continuing to monitor the risks and harms of other currently legal substances, including Mephedrone - thought to be the most popular legal drug on the party circuit.
    [IMGR="blue"]http://www.drugs-forum.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=12158&stc=1&d=1261533952[/IMGR]
    The spokesman said that the Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drug was currently looking at those substances as a matter of priority and their advice would inform the response of Ministers.

    For Maryon Stewart, a more wide-ranging prohibition of legal highs cannot come quickly enough. Every day that passes, she believes puts more people at risk.

    She said she had already been robbed of a precious daughter - and no one else should have to suffer that.

    Mark White
    December 23, 2009
    Sky News
    http://news.sky.com/skynews/Home/UK...on_Angry_Home_Office_Not_Banning_Drugs_Faster
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