1. Dear Drugs-Forum readers: We are a small non-profit that runs one of the most read drug information & addiction help websites in the world. We serve over 4 million readers per month, and have costs like all popular websites: servers, hosting, licenses and software. To protect our independence we do not run ads. We take no government funds. We run on donations which average $25. If everyone reading this would donate $5 then this fund raiser would be done in an hour. If Drugs-Forum is useful to you, take one minute to keep it online another year by donating whatever you can today. Donations are currently not sufficient to pay our bills and keep the site up. Your help is most welcome. Thank you.
    PLEASE HELP
  1. Lunar Loops
    The following article appeared in today's Daily Record. Interesting approach, although you are still relying on people to actualy use the bins. Having normal litter bins in graveyards has never stopped people from dropping beer cans and the like on the ground.

    20 April 2006
    CEMETERY NEEDLE BIN CLEAN-UP
    Bid to attract 'crypt tourism'
    By Oliver Coleman
    TWO graveyards have been fitted with special bins for drug users - to help attract more tourists. The cemeteries in Edinburgh have become the first in Scotland to install needle bins. The city council also acted because of fears visitors could be injured as they searched for their ancestors.
    Graveyards in the city have become increasingly popular attractions in recent years. But the old crypts also make good hiding places for drug addicts looking for somewhere private to inject themselves. In recent months, cemetery workers have found dozens of syringes, needles, and other drugs equipment at graveyards across the city.

    Although there have been no reports of injuries from a discarded needle, they can carry diseases such as HIV and hepatitis. Needle bins were placed in St Cuthbert's and Canongate Church graveyards. If the pilot is successful, it will be extended throughout the city, including to its most famous cemetery, Greyfriars Kirkyard. Sharon Simpson of Action on Alcohol and Drugs in Edinburgh, who are working with the council, said: "We suspect people may be staying in places like lodging houses where they are not allowed to use drugs, so they go to cemeteries for privacy. "But in recent years we have also found the graveyards are becoming increasing popular with tourists.

    "The recent interest in people researching their genealogy has led to an increasing number of visitors to our graveyards. "We are worried that if drug equipment is left in the graveyard there is the real hazard that someone could be injured."

Comments

To make a comment simply sign up and become a member!