1. Dear Drugs-Forum readers: We are a small non-profit that runs one of the most read drug information & addiction help websites in the world. We serve over 4 million readers per month, and have costs like all popular websites: servers, hosting, licenses and software. To protect our independence we do not run ads. We take no government funds. We run on donations which average $25. If everyone reading this would donate $5 then this fund raiser would be done in an hour. If Drugs-Forum is useful to you, take one minute to keep it online another year by donating whatever you can today. Donations are currently not sufficient to pay our bills and keep the site up. Your help is most welcome. Thank you.
    PLEASE HELP
  1. Alfa
    OTTAWA PROMISING NEW POT LAWS

    The federal government is poised to reintroduce controversial legislation to
    decriminalize marijuana and will accompany it with a bill giving police the
    power to force drivers to take a test, when warranted, to prove whether they
    are driving while stoned.

    Justice Minister Irwin Cotler said he plans to introduce both pieces of
    legislation in the next month.

    Nor does Cotler have any plans to change the legislation decriminalizing
    marijuana first introduced by his predecessor, Martin Cauchon. "It might get
    changed in committee but we are basically reintroducing that legislation."

    Legislation to decriminalize marijuana is among several changes Cotler says
    he plans to make in a bid to overhaul Canada's criminal justice system.

    While many of Cotler's initiatives were not spelled out in last week's
    throne speech, he said his plans are reflected in the principles outlined in
    the speech such as a commitment to human rights and defending the Charter of
    Rights and Freedoms.

    Cotler took a first step last week, introducing a bill to protect vulnerable
    persons from things such as child pornography and a second bill concerning
    those with mental disorders. However, that's just the start of what he plans
    to accomplish.

    "If I were to look at our legislative and parliamentary agenda, I think we
    probably, proportionately, have as many if not more bills from our
    department and that relate to criminal justice than anywhere else in the
    government."

    While Cotler plans to lessen the penalty for those caught with small amounts
    of marijuana, he will also give police more powers to stop and test, when
    warranted, those who smoke pot and then drive.

    Currently, the law obliges drivers to submit to a breathalyzer test if
    police suspect they have been driving under the influence of alcohol, but
    there has been no legal obligation for anyone to submit to a test to
    determine whether they are under the influence of marijuana, he said.

    "Now a technology has been developed which allows for a parallel process
    with regard to drug-impaired driving to be investigated and enforced as we
    have for alcohol-impaired driving."

    Cotler also plans to give police more tools by reintroducing legislation to
    expand the existing DNA databank.

    The plight of sex-trade workers is also one of Cotlers concerns. "We want to
    look at how sex-trade workers can be protected and what legislative
    initiatives need to take place in that regard."

Comments

  1. Alfa
    CONTENTIOUS POT BILL BACK

    OTTAWA - The federal government is poised to reintroduce controversial
    legislation to decriminalize marijuana and will accompany it with a bill
    giving police the power to force drivers to take a test, when warranted, to
    prove whether they are driving while stoned.

    In an interview with The Montreal Gazette, Justice Minister Irwin Cotler
    said he plans to introduce both pieces of legislation sometime in the next
    month.

    Nor does Cotler have any plans to change the legislation decriminalizing
    marijuana first introduced by his predecessor Martin Cauchon. "It might get
    changed in committee but we are basically reintroducing that legislation."

    Legislation to decriminalize marijuana is just one of several changes Cotler
    says he plans to make in a bid to overhaul Canada's criminal justice system.

    While many of Cotler's initiatives were not spelled out in last week's
    throne speech, he said his plans are reflected in the principles outlined in
    the speech such as a commitment to human rights and defending the Charter of
    Rights and Freedoms.

    FIRST STEP LAST WEEK

    Cotler took a first step last week, introducing a bill to protect vulnerable
    persons from things such as child porn and a second bill concerning those
    with mental disorders. However, that's just the start of what he plans to
    accomplish.

    "If I were to look at our legislative and parliamentary agenda, I think we
    probably, proportionately, have as many if not more bills from our
    department and that relate to criminal justice than anywhere else in the
    government."

    While Cotler plans to lessen the penalty for those caught with small amounts
    of marijuana, he will also give police more powers to stop and test, when
    warranted, those who smoke pot and then get behind the wheel.

    Currently, the law obliges drivers to submit to a breathalyzer test if
    police suspect they have been driving under the influence of alcohol, but
    there has been no legal obligation for anyone to submit to a test to
    determine whether they are under the influence of marijuana, he said.

    "Now a technology has been developed which allows for a parallel process
    with regard to drug-impaired driving to be investigated and enforced as we
    have for alcohol-impaired driving."

    Cotler also plans to give police more tools by reintroducing legislation to
    expand the existing DNA databank, which matches
    the blood, hair and saliva
    of convicted criminals against samples taken at crimes scenes.
To make a comment simply sign up and become a member!