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Prohibition Adds To Drug Trafficking

  1. mbarnes0
    PROHIBITION ADDS TO DRUG TRAFFICKING

    Regarding Anthony Gregory's Dec. 7 op-ed, the drug war has a clear historical precedent in alcohol prohibition. Attempts to limit the supply of illegal drugs while demand remains constant only increase the profitability of drug trafficking. For addictive drugs like heroin, a spike in street prices leads desperate addicts to increase criminal activity to feed desperate habits. The drug war doesn't fight crime, it fuels crime.

    With alcohol prohibition repealed, liquor bootleggers no longer gun each other down in drive-by shootings, nor do consumers go blind drinking unregulated bathtub gin. While U.S. politicians ignore the drug war's historical precedent, European countries are embracing harm reduction, a public health alternative based on the principle that both drug abuse and prohibition have the potential to cause harm.

    Examples of harm reduction include needle exchange programs to stop the spread of HIV, marijuana regulation aimed at separating the hard and soft drug markets, and treatment alternatives that do not require incarceration as a prerequisite. Unfortunately, fear of appearing "soft on crime" compels many U.S. politicians to support a failed drug war that ultimately subsidizes organized crime. Drug abuse is bad, but drug prohibition is worse.

    Robert Sharpe, MPA
    Common Sense for Drug Policy, Washington, DC

    Sat, 12 Dec 2009
    Summit Daily News (CO)
    http://www.mapinc.org/drugnews/v09/n1116/a03.html

Comments

  1. mbarnes0
    DRUG WAR A FAILURE

    Regarding Andres Oppenheimer's Dec. 10 column U.S. may take new look at 'war on drugs,' the drug war is a cure worse than the disease. Attempts to limit the supply of illegal drugs while demand remains constant only increase the profitability of drug trafficking.

    For addictive drugs like heroin, a spike in street prices leads desperate addicts to increase criminal activity to feed desperate habits. The drug war doesn't fight crime, it fuels crime.

    With alcohol prohibition repealed, liquor bootleggers no longer gun each other down, nor do consumers go blind drinking unregulated bathtub gin. While U.S. politicians ignore the drug war's historical precedent, European countries are embracing harm reduction, a public-health alternative based on the principle that both drug abuse and prohibition have the potential to cause harm.

    Examples of harm reduction include needle-exchange programs to stop the spread of HIV, marijuana regulation aimed at separating the hard- and soft-drug markets and treatment alternatives that do not require that those who are addicted be incarcerated as a prerequisite.

    Unfortunately, fear of appearing "soft on crime" compels many U.S. politicians to support a failed drug war that ultimately subsidizes organized crime. Drug abuse is bad, but the drug war is worse.

    Robert Sharpe,
    Common Sense for Drug Policy, Washington, D.C.

    Mon, 14 Dec 2009
    Miami Herald (FL)
    http://www.mapinc.org/drugnews/v09/n1116/a11.html
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