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  1. Beenthere2Hippie
    Synthetic marijuana is illegal in nearly every state and under federal law, regulations that didn’t exist just six years ago before the explosion in the popularity of the dangerous psychoactive chemicals.

    But two years after its players were first linked to synthetic marijuana, the NFL hasn’t added it to its list of banned substances. That means while drugs of abuse like cocaine, heroin and even traditional marijuana are tested for by the league, screenings for synthetic marijuana aren’t a typical part of the NFL’s testing protocols.

    “As long as people are willing to do stupid things to their bodies, we are going to have problems with these kinds of drugs,” DEA spokesman Lawrence Payne told USA TODAY Sports. “This is not something you can legislate or arrest your way out of to solve.” NFL spokesman Brian McCarthy told USA TODAY Sports on Thursday that "synthetic marijuana falls within the purview of the policy” since the substances are illegal drugs. “Synthetic marijuana is not currently part of the basic testing panel, but the medical advisors have the discretion to add it to an individual’s testing panel as appropriate,” McCarthy said. That “discretion” occurs after a player is already in the league’s drug program via a previous violation, according to the joint drug agreement between the NFL and NFL Players Association.

    Messages left for the NFL Players Assocation on Wednesday and Thursday by USA TODAY Sports were not returned.

    Already in 2016, two more NFL players were linked to synthetic cannabinoids, which are often herbs doused with chemicals imported from overseas. Once smoked, the chemicals bind to the same receptor in the brain as the active ingredient in traditional marijuana (THC), although at much higher doses. Use of synthetic cannabinoids can lead to hallucinations, seizures and even death. Over a five-month span last year, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said there were 15 reported deaths from the use of the drug.

    “Referring to these drugs as synthetic marijuana gives people the false sense of safety,” Payne said. “The use of these drugs can have disastrous consequences and it’s not just a problem here in the U.S. This is an issue around the globe.”

    While authorities have cracked down on the head shops and gas stations that sell the drugs under names like “Mr. Happy,” “Spice” and “Funky Monkey,” synthetic marijuana can be found fairly easily on the Internet.

    Patriots defensive end Chandler Jones sought medical attention on Jan. 10 and The Boston Globe reported Jones used synthetic marijuana. Seattle Seahawks fullback Derrick Coleman told police that he had taken synthetic marijuana before his hit-and-run accident in October, according to a police report released on Monday.

    While the drugs aren’t on the banned list under the league’s substance abuse policy, a program run jointly with the NFLPA, a player can still be suspended is if he’s charged with possessing, using or trafficking the chemicals. That’s what happened to Bills defensive lineman Marcell Dareus, who was suspended for the first game of the 2015 season. He was arrested in May 2014 for felony possession of a controlled substance and possession of drug paraphernalia in Alabama, although he pleaded guilty to lesser charges.

    Kellen Winslow, then a tight end with the New York Jets, was arrested in New Jersey in November 2013 for possession of synthetic pot.




    A.J. Perez - USA Today/Jan. 28, 2016
    http://www.usatoday.com/story/sport...marijuana-nflpa-drug-testing-banned/79463418/
    Newshawk Crew

    Author Bio

    Beenthere2Hippie
    BT2H is a retired news editor and writer from the NYC area who, for health reasons, retired to a southern US state early, and where BT2H continues to write and to post drug-related news to DF.

Comments

  1. tatittle
    I love the way reporters try to make whatever drug they are discussion appear to have only undesirable affects: "can lead to hallucinations, seizures and even death"
    I remember when I was a kid wondering why anyone would ever want to do a particular drug..."why would anyone want to run around in public crazed and neked, go insane after the 1st use, or have a seizure and die"!!!
    These tactics may have the opposite affect of the intentions behind the manipulation and misleading nature of the writing by making kids cynical and un-influenced about anything they hear about drugs from a public source once they find out they were misled in instances like this. Of course paradoxical affects are common in any attempts at social engineering.
    When I run into reports from people like staff AP/UPI/Rueters or worst of all local reporters written about stuff I am well versed in, I find the inaccuracies and (mostly unintentional) mistakes mind-boggling and downright scary. If they are so faulty in their reports of this stuff, why should I assume they are any more accurate in the reports on subjects I am less familiar with? Alot of these news stories are written by 25-30 year olds who are merely doing what amounts to a current events essay in school. They casually repeat what other (largely similar demo') reporters have discussed previously, without any significant fact checking or critical examination. It reminds me of the continual suprise I have to find how uneducated people with good jobs etc. can be on subjects outside a couple of specific areas of expertise...if I encounter it via something they have written its even worse.
  2. addaminsane
    true, but synthetic products ALWAYS have undesirable effects
  3. Diverboone
    1)But two years after its players were first linked to synthetic marijuana, the NFL hasn’t added it to its list of banned substances.

    My first question is. What is the definition of "synthetic marijuana"? I highly doubt the author has the slightest clue to the answer. Which just sets the pace for the rest of the article.

    2)That means while drugs of abuse like cocaine, heroin and even traditional marijuana are tested for by the league, screenings for synthetic marijuana aren’t a typical part of the NFL’s testing protocols.

    I'm unaware of any employer, group, or Government's drug testing policy and guidelines that test or these types of drugs. But the author deems it necessary the NFL should be thrown into the spotlight for following standard operating procedurers.

    3)As long as people are willing to do stupid things to their bodies, we are going to have problems with these kinds of drugs.

    Just what problem is the author having with what others do to their bodies?

    4)This is not something you can legislate or arrest your way out of to solve.

    Well why in the hell are we still trying to legislate our way out of it 50 years later?

    5)Already in 2016, two more NFL players were linked to synthetic<span style="font-size:11.0pt;line-height:115%; font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;mso-fareast-font-family: Calibri;mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-latin;mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;;mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi; mso-ansi-language:EN-US;mso-fareast-language:EN-US;mso-bidi-language:AR-SA"> cannabinoids.

    All NFL players are linked to breathing large amounts of Nitrogen. Correlation does not equal causation.

    6)Use of synthetic cannabinoids can lead to hallucinations, seizures and even death.

    As can drinking too much water. Lots of stuff can do lots of things, but that does not mean they will.

    7)Over a five-month span last year, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said there were 15 reported deaths from the use of the drug.

    3 people per month out of a population of 320,000,000. Which is 0.0000000094% of the population. It's the same as having 100 miles of Hwy but focusing on just over 1/2 inch of it.

    8)Referring to these drugs as synthetic marijuana gives people the false sense of safety.

    Did they really just say that? How was this determined?

    9)The use of these drugs can have disastrous consequences and it’s not just a problem here in the U.S. This is an issue around the globe.

    There's that word "can" again. Lots of stuff "can" do lots of things, but that does not mean it's going to. Mere speculation.

    10)While authorities have cracked down on the head shops and gas stations that sell the drugs under names like “Mr. Happy,”[FONT=&quot]“[/FONT]
  4. Diverboone
    Lost the rest of this post. I'm done for the night.
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