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  1. Lehendakari
    http://www.nj.com/business/times/index.ssf?/base/business-3/1194584856113330.xml&coll=5

Comments

  1. whirlybird
    SWIM has come across either 10 or 20mg (cant remember) oxycontin. The person that had it said it could only be eaten, because if it was crushed it would be no good. SWIM thinks that the person claimed it would destroy the drug when exposed to the air. Whatever the case, abuse-proof drugs are not only being developed, they are already in use (at least in the USA). Oh yeah, btw they were generic oxys.
  2. juanathan
    always remember that the consumer can choose what and what not to ingest! pharmaceutical companies have ungodly amounts of power and sway and money invested in all sorts of things, but if consumers do their homework and know which companies/generics have the anti-tamper safeguards and which do not, it might be possible to subvert the whole system. i would imagine there would always be at least one alternative that someone can be prescribed WITHOUT the safeguards (i.e. allergic to naltrexone?), unless the FDA makes tamper-resistant opiates/amphetamines mandatory. that would be a bitch.
  3. Paracelsus
    That would never happen, because not all patients are ambulatory (many will still need IV opiates, etc). They may promote the use of tamper-resistant pharmaceuticals though.

    Do you have any sources for that besides dubious claims (many people actually snort crushed OxyContin)? Of course there are simple long-release formulas, but are you sure there are advanced techniques such as the naltrexone core? I have a hard time believing that, especially with generics.
    That is interesting. I wonder if it will be listed as an inactive ingredient then.

    Of course ways will be found to abuse these. If the naltrexone core truly stays perfectly intact while in the body, one could simply let the pills dissolve in water kept constantly somewhere close to body temperature until only the little core is left, along with insoluble inactives. Maybe an "EWWE" (extended warm water extraction) will one day become as popular as the CWE :D
  4. whirlybird
    The oxys SWIM came across were not simple long-release formulas. The elephant that had them has scraped off the coating to long-release oxys and snorted them. The way SWIM understood it, these were not like that. Around here, oxys are more commonly snorted than eaten. The ones that like to eat them are few and far, which is why the oxys the elephant had were so cheap. SWIM is going to try to find the elephant and ask a few questions about those oxys. Will post again after more research. Besides the naltrexone core and time release pills with a coating, are there any other ways to time-release a pill? Paracelsus, when you say long-release formulas, are you speaking of the coating type long-release pills or do they actually modify the formula so the drug becomes active over whatever period of time? If so, then thats probably what the elephant had, but SWIM has never heard of anything like this. Then again, SWIM isn't too big on pharms.
  5. Zaprenz
    ^One of the more elegant and simpler ways SWIM read of making an oral formulation unsuitable for injection is simply putting something like capsaicin (from chilli powder) in with the active drug. Digested via the oral route the amount of capsaicin has little effect, injected or snorted though and it is extremely painful.



    The problem is the criminalisation of such drugs and the witch hunt of prescribers but SWIM at least sees the relative benefit (assuming they are successful - which is possibly a big assumption) of these tamper proof medicines - people in serious pain who have an urgent need for them might get hold of them easier (because prescribers may be more willing to prescribe them)
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