1. Dear Drugs-Forum readers: We are a small non-profit that runs one of the most read drug information & addiction help websites in the world. We serve over 4 million readers per month, and have costs like all popular websites: servers, hosting, licenses and software. To protect our independence we do not run ads. We take no government funds. We run on donations which average $25. If everyone reading this would donate $5 then this fund raiser would be done in an hour. If Drugs-Forum is useful to you, take one minute to keep it online another year by donating whatever you can today. Donations are currently not sufficient to pay our bills and keep the site up. Your help is most welcome. Thank you.
    PLEASE HELP
  1. 5-HT2A
    Seven weeks after the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration officially withdrew its plan to ban kratom, the federal government is once again set to decide the fate of the herb and the people who rely on it for pain relief and other treatment.

    The DEA had initially planned to use its emergency scheduling power to push through the ban without input from the public, despite concerns from lawmakers and scientists ― as well as kratom users ― that the move would do more harm than good. In October, however, the DEA opened a public comment period allowing individuals to weigh in on the agency’s decision to place mitragynine and 7-hydroxymitragynine, two active compounds in kratom, in Schedule I. Substances in this category include heroin and LSD and are considered to have no known medical benefit and a high potential for abuse.

    With the comment period set to close on Thursday, the DEA will now have to take into account the nearly 9,000 submissions from people who wanted to voice their opinions about this proposed expansion of the war on drugs.

    But kratom isn’t in the clear yet. The DEA is currently awaiting the results of a U.S. Food and Drug Administration analysis on the potential harms and health benefits of the herb, which will determine if kratom truly poses an “imminent hazard to the public safety,” as the agency initially claimed in August.

    The DEA doesn’t know when it will get the results of the FDA’s review, Russell Baer, a spokesperson for the agency, told The Huffington Post.

    “We’ve asked the FDA to expedite their analysis, but they’ve not given us any indication as to when that may be done, other than as soon as practical,” said Baer. “They’re involved in an exhaustive scientific review and evaluation, so these things do take time.”

    Although Baer said he expects the DEA to wait for the FDA’s analysis before deciding on an appropriate schedule for kratom ― or whether it should be scheduled at all ― he noted that the agency could still proceed with emergency scheduling even in the absence of more concrete scientific evidence.

    The DEA’s next steps will have huge implications for people like Joshua Levy. In the video above, Levy explains that he turned to kratom after struggling with dependence on the opioid painkillers he’d been prescribed following a hit-and-run accident. Like many kratom users, he says the herb gave him back the life that had been taken from him by addiction and other side-effects of narcotic painkillers.

    The kratom community is full of success stories like Levy’s. But together, they form only anecdotal evidence of the herb’s benefits, which is not enough to support a more official confirmation of its medicinal value.

    Experts like Andrew Kruegel, an associate research scientist at Columbia University, hope the DEA will allow kratom to remain legal so they can keep working to unlock the herb’s potential.

    Kruegel’s studies have shown that kratom can be used to alleviate mild pain, and that the plant’s negative side effects are relatively minor.

    “As a scientist, I try to be as objective as possible and not overstate the promise of kratom,” said Kruegel. “We just don’t know that much about the plant yet.”

    But Kruegel also has bigger hopes for kratom, which he believes can be used to aid in the development of safer alternatives to the prescription opioids that claimed more than 18,000 lives in the U.S. in 2014 due to overdose.

    “Of course, if it’s in Schedule I, historically that greatly limits the ability to do research on it,” he said.

    by Nick Wing

    November 30, 2016

    Source:
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/kratom-dea_us_583d8a66e4b04b66c01bb424?

Comments

  1. DUSK1
    Is there a pretty significant risk, that portrayed as a opioid detox botanical, it will be made prescription only? It seems the only argument for Kratom to stay how is it currently, is that there's no reason for it to be anywhere else.

    If regulating Kratom would send people into withdrawal as their supply dries up, for instance, is an argument for its continued legal status, the FDA would interpret that as 'prone to dependence and abuse' with 'significant withdrawal concerns' and would therefore likely be scheduled with other drugs with these features like what happens with research chemicals. The up-side for this is that, if the damage has been done, and the DEA and FDA now view Kratom as a medicine, it might get prescribed for opiate dependence, or pain in replacement of opiates, and therefore produced at a vastly higher standard. This would also prevent it from being a controlled substance, schedule 1 in America, as it would clearly then have medical value (although there are so many studies validating the medical value of other drugs in the American schedule 1, so i have little faith in the whole American decision making process)

    It seems the only way for Kratom to avoid regulatory changes is for the FDA to determine it in line with the safety of other dietary supplements (which are explicitly excluded from the treatment of any health condition) as, not a medicine, but a plain old supplement with limited benefit (think caffeine, nootropics etc).

    I hope things go well for Kratom in America in the near future, as this would be a promising sign for the rest of the world.
To make a comment simply sign up and become a member!