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  1. chillinwill
    Just days after the Government made the controversial decision to classify GBL as a Class C drug, these shocking pictures are a stark reminder of the devastating effects of the legal party drug.
    View attachment 10846
    Mikaila Tyhurst was an attractive 18-year-old when she started taking GBL. She dreamed of being an air stewardess.

    Now 22 but appearing much older than her years, she has lost her looks and her health after becoming an addict.

    Her front teeth were knocked out in a drug-induced fall, she has severe liver damage and three months ago she nearly died of an overdose.

    Mikaila, from Crumpsall, Manchester, has been admitted to hospital dozens of times, often unconscious, after drinking GBL (Gamma butyrolactone).

    The drug - similar to the date rape drug GHB is currently legal in this country although it is set to be banned before the end of the year. It is readily available online, at specialist shops, and in beauty products.

    The Government plans to make GBL a Class C when meant for human consumption drug by the end of the year, a lower classification than cannabis and ecstasy.

    As the government this week launched a £200,000 publicity campaign about the dangers of GBL aimed at university students, Mikaila spoke of her addiction.

    She said: 'It has destroyed my life. I hope that by talking about what it has done to me it might stop someone else from trying it.

    'When I look at this picture of myself at my 18th birthday party I feel sick at how much I have changed, it makes me really sad.'

    Today she starts an inpatient detox programme to wean her off the drug and help her build a stable life.
    View attachment 10847
    But after several previous attempts to stop taking the drug, she knows that it will be tough.

    She said: 'I am trying really hard to stop taking it but it is very hard, it is very addictive. I don't want to take it but when I stop I feel so sick.

    'When I go to hospital they don't really understand what GBL is, staff there don't seem to understand it. '

    'I am really excited about starting detox, I am going to make sure it works. I know this is my last chance.'

    Mikaila was introduced to GBL when she was 18 and the addiction wrecked all her plans for the future.

    Over a period of two years she took GBL almost every day.

    Her hospital notes show she has been repeatedly admitted to A&E at North Manchester General, often brought in by ambulance.

    She is often unconscious, has been found collapsed or is suffering fits, and medics have reported a series of bumps and bruises including serious head injuries.

    Mikaila was admitted to intensive care for 11 days in June after collapsing and was diagnosed with liver failure and needed a series of blood transfusions.

    She had previously attended A&E in May when she was vomiting blood, in March after suffering a fit, and she was taken in by ambulance in February after collapsing.

    Her records also show a series of admissions during 2008.

    Dr David Fitton, a GP who works at Mikaila's local health centre, referred her for help with her addiction in July this year.

    After her inpatient detox programme she has been given a place at a 'dry' hostel and hopes this will be the first step in rebuilding her life.

    Campaigner Maryon Stewart, whose daughter Hester, 21, a medical student from Brighton died after taking GBL for the first time, is calling for the government to classify it as a class A drug along with heroin and ecstasy, so users would face even tougher penalties.

    Mrs Stewart, a leading nutritionist, said she felt 'cheated, frustrated and angry' that the Home Office had hesitated on a promise last year to ban GBL, despite it being illegal in several other countries.

    Mrs Stewart said: 'I think GBL is every bit as dangerous as heroin and ecstasy, if not more so. Because it's lethal when combined with alcohol, it should be a class A drug.'

    Mikaila is backing Mrs Stewart and also appealing for products which contain GBL -including some beauty products - to be withdrawn from supermarkets and high street stores.

    She said: 'I have tried to contact the people who make and sell these products but they are not listening.

    'This drug is so dangerous it should be given the highest possible rating.'

    Home Secretary Alan Johnson launched the government's GBL campaign, aimed mainly at the student clubbing community.

    The campaign will be carried on posters, leaflets and postcards in clubs, bars and record shops and also promoted online and at events organised by the National Union of Students and the music magazine Mixmag.

    Mr Johnson said: 'There is sometimes a misconception that because a substance is legal it is safe to consume. That is not the case; they are dangerous chemicals.

    'Through this campaign we want to educate young people who might be tempted to experiment with 'legal highs' that they don't know what they are taking and these substances can have devastating effects, particularly when mixed with alcohol.'

    The government is in the process of banning three substances that give legal highs - GBL; the cannabis substitute 'spice'; and the amphetamine alternative BZP.

    The drugs are sold in 'head shops' - specialising in drug culture paraphernalia - and online. Chemically some are similar in composition to the illegal drugs they replicate.

    GBL is closely related to the notorious dance drug GBH - but it is still legal and can kill.

    Gamma-butyrolactone is a dangerous drug with sedative and anaesthetic effects. And yet it is sold openly as a 'party drug' and can be found easily on the internet.

    GBL converts to GHB shortly after entering the body and is said to be particularly dangerous when used with alcohol and other depressant or sedative substances including recreational drugs.

    GHB is now a Class C drug - illegal to have, give away or sell. But GBL is a still a legal product.

    It comes as a colourless, oily liquid with a weak odour and is a common solvent used in industrial products like paint strippers and stain removers, and even nail varnish remover.

    When ingested - usually mixed with a drink - it is said to give a legal high not unlike ecstasy.

    By Daily Mail Reporter
    September 24, 2009
    Daily Mail
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...devastating-effects-legal-party-drug-GBL.html

Comments

  1. chillinwill
    Girl ravaged by party drug GBL

    THIS shocking picture shows how a pretty teenager was ravaged by the effects of a legal party drug - in the space of just four years.
    [IMGR="black"]http://www.drugs-forum.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=10849&stc=1&d=1253795890[/IMGR]
    Mikaila Tyhurst was an attractive 18-year-old who dreamed of becoming an airline stewardess when she started taking GBL. The drug is popular with clubbers and students and similar to the date rape drug GHB.

    Now 22, she has lost her looks and her health after becoming an addict.

    Her front teeth were knocked out in a drug-induced fall, she has severe liver damage and three months ago she nearly died of an overdose.

    Mikaila, from Crumpsall, has been admitted to hospital dozens of times, often unconscious, after drinking GBL (Gamma butyrolactone). The drug is set to be banned before the end of the year.

    As the government this week launched a £200,000 publicity campaign, aimed at students, about the dangers of GBL , Mikaila has bravely told her story to the M.E.N and urged young people to learn from her ordeal.

    Mikaila said: "It has destroyed my life. I hope that by talking about what it has done to me it might stop someone else from trying it.

    "When I look at this picture of myself at my 18th birthday party I feel sick at how much I have changed, it makes me really sad."

    The drug, which can be lethal in tiny doses if mixed with alcohol, is expected to be classified as a class C drug - attracting penalties of up to 14 years in prison for dealers - later this year.

    Campaigner Maryon Stewart, whose daughter Hester died after taking GBL for the first time, is calling for the government to classify it as a class A drug along with heroin and ecstasy, so users would face even tougher penalties.

    Mrs Stewart said: "I think GBL is every bit as dangerous as heroin and ecstasy, if not more so. Because it's lethal when combined with alcohol, it should be a class A drug."

    Mikaila is backing Mrs Stewart and also appealing for products which contain GBL - including some beauty products - to be withdrawn from supermarkets and high street stores.

    She said: "I have tried to contact the people who make and sell these products but they are not listening. This drug is so dangerous it should be given the highest possible rating."


    Home Secretary Alan Johnson launched the government GBL campaign, aimed mainly at the student clubbing community.

    The campaign will be carried on posters, leaflets and postcards in clubs, bars and record shops and also promoted online and at events organised by the National Union of Students and the music magazine Mixmag.

    Mr Johnson said: "There is sometimes a misconception that because a substance is legal it is safe to consume. That is not the case; they are dangerous chemicals.

    "Through this campaign we want to educate young people who might be tempted to experiment with `legal highs' that they don't know what they are taking and these substances can have devastating effects, particularly when mixed with alcohol."

    The government is in the process of banning three substances that give legal highs - GBL; the cannabis substitute spice; and the amphetamine alternative BZP.

    The drugs are sold in `head shops' specialising in drug culture paraphernalia and online. Chemically some are similar in composition to the illegal drugs they replicate.

    by Amanda Crook
    September 24, 2009
    Manchester Evening News
    http://www.manchestereveningnews.co.uk/news/s/1138919_pictured_girl_ravaged_by_party_drug_gbl
  2. Abrad
    GBL causes liver damage?
  3. MrG
    Chronic use may do, but, to be honest with you, I've not found any reliable resource that could confirm this.

    I've always said that nobody should be ingesting GBL, but this girl is exactly the kind of idiot that this reporter was looking for.

    It could just as easily be . . . .

    Girl ravaged by party drug . . . ALCOHOL!

    Maybe we should check the young adults in north England towns who have serious alcohol addictions and see how their mugshots compare.
  4. anonuser30500
    Swim remembers this chemical back in the 80s and 90s. Some ravers were into it and one I knew would buy a fair bit and pass it on. It was legal back then.

    Swim never fancied taking it when he heard what it was used for in industrial products and solvents.

    As for damaging you, surely if you take enough of anything it will do harm.

    Those who used sparingly would not end up looking like they had been through the wars.

    That said, she has no make up on in the photo, its in daylight, and her hair is combed when she is best suited to a fringe.

    Also, she looks like the booze might be a big play in how she looks. Face seems a bit puffed up and skin has that tone of a lady who might drinking more than she ought to.

    So, er, yes, don't take copious amounts of stuff.
  5. Abrad
    It's still legal.
  6. DarbyWay
    Before or after, I'd hit it.

    KIDDING.

    And the media keeps on layering the 'Drugs are bad, m'kay!' propaganda. Nobody forced the GBL down her throat.
  7. Caeden
    This winds me up so much.

    Not only is the article <b>full</b> off misinformation but they clearly fail to point out that the girl clearly has/had underlying issues and would've ended up an alcoholic/addicted to another drug given the chance.

    I hate the British/media with a passion, and when they come out with crap like:

    "When ingested - usually mixed with a drink - it is said to give a legal high not unlike ecstasy." - it just makes it clear that they do not understand what they're reporting. Utter ignorance.

    *rage*
  8. Makesmefeelbig

    EDIT: Yeah, sorry, I'm a bit of an arsehole.
  9. Haardstyle_x
    Oh dear, what a state!
  10. Montgolfier
  11. MrG
    There are currently dozens of UK based sources for pure GBL and she chooses to suck on a nail varnish remover pad?

    Very interesting observation on the possible source of her liver damage too.
  12. snapper
    Well swim took unreacted gbl about every day for 9 years then stopped when it ran out with no withdrawals. SWIM had never had liver disease during that time or anything else other than good sleep and a nice anabolic effect. That is, as long as SWIM took a 12 hour break everyday.. 24/7 dosing leads to heinous withdrawal.
    SWIM thinks there is more to this and blames adulterants and perhaps alcohol too..SWIMs gbl was BASF grade - SWIM bets many sources are not so pure..
  13. Abrad
    Anyone notice this?
    Then the the very first paragraph.
    Stupid journalist...
  14. EscapeDummy
    Thats... horrible. That HAS to be deliberate, doesn't it? And it appears to predicate the entire article on a lie.
  15. MrG
    What, journalists not telling the truth? Surely you jest.

    They'd probably claim that they are calling for a ban on *any* product containing GBL, something that the government, quit rightly, won't do because it is an industrial lactone that has many, many uses.

    It's a bit like calling for a ban on things like cleaning gels because they have alcohol in them.
  16. Motorhead
    Everytime I look at those pics I say to myself that can't be the same girl. Also if you watch the vid from the second post the interviewer attributes the drastic change in her appearance to falling on her face so many fucking times, not from the actual toxicity of the dope. Tabloid fodder yessir.
  17. chinpokomaster
    I don't think I can read "news" articles about drugs anymore. They simply make me too angry.
  18. sez666
    Mikaila Tyhurst is my Cousin,
    she is a lovely girl and i hate to see nagative comments left as people assume she is a IDIOT,
    i can comfirm that mikaila did NOT become an addict to gbl on her own , she was actualy spiked daily on a number of occations through out the day by her ex boyfriend and she often walk up in hospital, before it was too late mikaila was addicted to it and that is how it started,
    mikaila who is veru close to me was and still is a very inteligent girl and she would not be in this situation had her ex partner had not spiked her at all!!!
  19. Motorhead
    sez666, where are all these negative comments towards your friend? The members that have posted are bashing the sloppy and clearly anti-drug reporting it seems to me.
  20. sez666
    this is my cousin makaila and although you seem to think she looks 30 in her before pic, i can assure you that she was a very pretty girl,
    she has a little girl who is also very pretty and its not very nice for her family to see pathetic comments like this,
    mikaila is not a heavy drinker at all, the damage is done thru gbl, which her ex spiked her with for a long time!!!
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