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What I think about psychedelics

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  1. Joe-(5-HTP)
    What I think about psychedelics

    When I first "got into" psychedelics, I thought they were amazing and so on, and I felt they were deeply significant in some way. But I couldn't figure out what way.

    I read Huxley's "doors of perception", I read what T Leary and Thompson said about it. I read what self proclaimed "psychonauts" and "shamans" or "guru spirit of the ancestral garden of bullshit" and so on said about it.

    And finally, 6 years later, do u know what I conclude?

    There is nothing more to psychedelics than the feeling that there is something more to psychedelics.

    And you know what... I think that's great. Why can't we just enjoy the feeling of wonder and amazement for what it is? Why do we have to attach some label to it or try to contextualize it in some fantasy which is only there to serve our own ego.

    So am I saying that psychedelics are purely hedonistic then? Is there no difference between some boring person having a "fun" trip just looking at pretty colors, and a person who has a deeply moving feeling of transcendence and wonder? Is there nothing more to awe than just enjoying awe? Is there nothing to transcendence other than enjoying the feeling of transcendence?

    That doesn't actually sound quite right does it? So here is how this all makes sense:

    People who experience awe in their life will seek awe.
    Those who experience transcendence will seek transcendence.
    Anyone who experiences wonder will continue to wonder.

    So, there is real value to these mental states, as long as we apply them to things in real life, and reality.

    You see, then, how these mystics, shamans or tim leary people were actually wasting the benefit they got from psychedelics. Instead of using these experiences to benefit their life, they apply them to their belief system instead. All the transcendence those people experience on psychedelics is essentially attributed to whatever their belief system says about transcendence.

    Just like religious people, who attribute all good events to God instead of themselves or the world.

Comments

  1. SpatialReason
    The point of it still stands for introspection. It isn't often that you see the mechanics of your own thought process and mind broken down. It is hard enough to think about how you think, or contrive a thought about why the thought or belief came to be. These drugs seem to help mold an avenue to easily and fluidly analyzing these sorts of things.

    It helps a person see themselves for what other see them as. It is a hard notion to grasp, but that third person view of ones inner self and personality can do heaps and bounds for an ego that needs softened.
  2. rawbeer
    Very interesting ideas! As anti-climactic as your explanation may seem to some seekers, I think you hit the nail on the head here.

    I have spent a lot of time wondering what the deeper meaning of psychedelia is, and spent a lot of time attempting to make logical sense of it. Trying to even explain what the psychedelic experience is in logical terms can be an interesting thought experiment.

    But ultimately it's pretty much a waste of time, just like trying to explain music logically is a waste of time. Sure it's fun to discuss music, but the point of music is not to understand it logically or explain it. The point of music is music.

    And so it is for psychedelics. The point is the inspiration they give you, and the thing you should strive for when using such drugs is to use that inspiration in some way that benefits you. Use it to inspire art, creative new ideas and perspectives, or just to clear your mind and bring back a sense of awe. Explanations of psychedelics, to a sober mind, generally seem like flaky, obvious new-age hokum anyway (which is often what they are.)

    Some people may find your explanation unsatisfying. But they should keep in mind that this is just an explanation. A more elaborate and mystical one is no better (maybe worse in fact). An explanation that is kind of boring and un-mysterious cannot make psychedelics boring and un-mysterious. The mundane appearance of sheet music does not detract from the composition's beauty.

    No explanation of music could even begin to approach the beauty and mystery of actual music. So don't waste your time trying to explain it, spend your time fruitfully, being moved by its awe and wonder.
  3. Joe-(5-HTP)
    Music is a great analogy. You are totally right about explanations not affecting mystery.

    Though that does imply that there actually is a lot to psychedelics, it's just inexpressible.

    That's an interesting idea, which I think I accept. It sounds plausible on many levels.
  4. rawbeer
    I don't know how much there is to psychedelics - it's a question of less is more. There's nothing that can be quantified or explained logically but it's only a reductive, sterile mind that views that as being meaningless. Like people who say "love is meaningless, just neurons firing, stop writing poems."

    One thing you can certainly say about meaningless, mysterious experiences is that they drive linguistic innovation. How much has language grown and elaborated and flowered by people trying to express the inexpressible? Poetry and word play is close to science in that it attempts to push into unknown territory and give form to the formless, and poetic devices and wordplay that do not succeed are forgotten. Sort of like evolution, or peer review.

    This is a lesson psychedelics have taught me, that there are different kinds of meaning which are not commensurate. There are levels of meaning both above and below logic and language, and some off to the side. Taking something out of context can destroy its meaning. Certain philosophers have suggested music be banned from society because it is meaningless. I would say the same thing about any philosophical system that says something so moronic about music!
  5. Cannabisonly
    Interesting analogy between psychedelis and music, I find that both psychedelics (as well as dissociatives but that might be more personnal) and music produce that feeling of utter amazement to their infinty of possibilities, and all the deep emotions both can produce as well as their unmatched originality... It's just so beautiful :cry:

    I thought I was going to use Hallucinogens for introspection but actually I'm a weak pathetic Borderline who can't stand Introspection, my everyday sober thought processes are already way too much introspective and while being introspective, I'm too much of a lazy-ass to make anything of it, and to me introspection is just too much to handle emotionally; so I guess I'm going to continue to consciously lie to myself because it's easier like that...

    Oooh well. I fear I ended on an off-topic and once again selfishly talking about myself, excuse me for this...
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