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Old 24-04-2006, 23:28
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Low down on some of the most common anti-depressant med's....

My aplogies I did not see that this info was just posted as a link from the same site just a little bit ago. I think it's a little easier to find them on here since they are all here on one page. Anyways, here is a run down on the most common SSRI drugs perscribed. Sorry that it's so long and detailed.


Quote:
Drug Name: Zoloft, Lustral

Generic Name: sertraline hydrochloride

Other Forms: oral concentrate

Class: Antidepressant, specifically SSRI.
Read up on these sections if you haven't done so already, because they cover a lot of information about multiple medications that I'm not going to repeat on many pages. I'm just autistic that way about not repeating myself.

FDA Approved Uses: Major Depression, Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (adults and children), Panic Disorder, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder.

Off-Label Uses: Fibromyalgia, Arthritis, Chronic Fatigue, Multiple Sclerosis, Bipolar Depression, Lupus, Headaches, Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), ADD/ADHD, Eating Disorders, Autistic Spectrum Disorders

Zoloft's pros and cons:

Pros: Zoloft is less likely than any SSRI but Lexapro to give you the common tummy problems. And they often aren't as bad. So if those are an issue and Lexapro is too expensive, you can get generic sertraline from Canada.



Cons: Probably the worst SSRI to take if bipolar is known or suspected. Definitely the worst to have taken if bipolar was a surprise.

Zoloft's side effects:

Typical Side Effects: The usual for SSRIs - headache, nausea, dry mouth, sweating, sleepiness or insomnia, and diarrhea or constipation, weight gain, loss of libido. Most everything but the weight gain and loss of libido usually goes away within a couple of weeks, and Zoloft (sertraline hydrochloride) tends to be a little lighter on everything except those two as well. Like Prozac it can just kill your appetite completely instead of making you gain weight.

For tips on how to cope with these side effects, please see our side effects page.

Not So Common Side Effects: Sweatiness, like really sweaty. Although not uncommon for SSRIs, Zoloft (sertraline hydrochloride) is a very "nervous" drug, as it can sometimes make you sweaty, shaky and generally uncomfortable in your own skin, more so than the others in this class.

These may or may not happen to you don't, so don't be surprised one way or the other.

Freaky Rare Side Effects: Priapism and skin discoloration, so this must be in Michael Jackson's cocktail. Also breast enlargement (there really is no pleasing some people), photophobia, and sleepwalking.


Interesting Stuff Your Doctor Probably Won't Tell You: Unlike most antidepressants, mixing booze and Zoloft (sertraline hydrochloride) will get you drunker. Maybe, the PI sheet contradicts itself on this point. In the real world the anecdotal data I've collected is that Zoloft does get you drunker. So of course the oral concentrate is suspended in alcohol and you can't use that if you're taking Antabuse.





Zoloft's Dosage and How to Take Zoloft: I'm just sticking with adults. Zoloft (sertraline hydrochloride) is approved for use by kids with OCD, but it's too tricky for me to deal with.

Depression and OCD - 50mg, once a day, usually in the morning. That's it. No titration. You can try taking more, as Zoloft (sertraline hydrochloride) is rated up to 200mg a day, but Pfizer's data don't prove it to be effective at more than 50mg a day. In the real world people do get plenty of benefit from taking more than 50mg a day, but give it a month before increasing the dosage. After that increase it by 25-50mg a day each week, as required, until it works or you give up. You should know by six weeks after starting if it's going to do anything or not.

Panic, PTSD and Anxiety disorders - 25mg, once a day, usually in the morning. After at least a week you may increase it to 50mg a day. That's it, just like depression & OCD. You can try taking more, but as above Pfizer states it's not worth it.

PMDD - start at 50mg a day. You'll have to work it out with your OB-GYN as to which days in your cycle will work best. If that doesn't work, up it by another 50mg next month. Then try other days in your cycle. Then try another 50mg a day. There's a bunch of fine-tuning required here.

Really, folks, don't go increasing the Zoloft (sertraline hydrochloride) every week until you've given it 4-6 weeks. You're risking a nasty bout of discontinuation syndrome for something that may not work for you at all. You'll know if it's going to work after a month. If it doesn't do anything at all at the initial dosage after six weeks, give up and move on. If it does something, just not enough, you can discuss a higher dosage with your doctor.

Days to Reach a Steady State: About a week.

When you're fully saturated with the medication and less prone to peaks and valleys of effects. You still might have peaks of effect after taking many meds, but with a lot of the meds you'll have fewer valleys after this point. In theory anyway.

How Long Zoloft Takes to Work: Like all SSRIs anywhere from a couple days to over a month. If you don't feel any positive benefit after six weeks, then you should talk to your doctor about either another SSRI or trying a med that hits another neurotransmitter.

Zoloft's Half-Life & Average Time to Clear Out of Your System: With a 26 hour half-life it will take five to six days to clear out of your system.

How to Stop Taking Zoloft: Your doctor should be recommending that you reduce your dosage by 25mg a day every week days if you need to stop taking it, if not more slowly than that. Based on the 26 hour half-life. For more information, please see the page on how to safely stop taking these crazy meds.
If you've worked your way up to a particular dosage, it's usually best to spend this many days at the next lowest dosage before going down the next lowest dosage before that and so forth. This is the least sucky way to avoid problems when stopping any psychiatric medication. Presuming you have the option of slowly tapering off them.


How Zoloft Works In Your Brain: Like all SSRIs Zoloft (sertraline hydrochloride) doesn't make you produce more serotonin, rather it makes your neurons soak for a longer period of time in the serotonin you already produce. Serotonin is one of the big three neurotransmitters responsible for depression, along with norepinephrine and dopamine. My wild-ass guess / rule of thumb is that imbalances of one or more of the three are responsible for 80% of the depression issues. It's all just a matter of figuring out exactly the extent of the tweaking and what neurotransmitters you exactly need to tweak.



If you've worked your way up to a particular dosage, it's usually best to spend this many days at the next lowest dosage before going down the next lowest dosage before that and so forth. This is the least sucky way to avoid problems when stopping any psychiatric medication. Presuming you have the option of slowly tapering off them.

Comments: While Zoloft (sertraline hydrochloride) is no more likely to trigger mania than any other SSRI, for some reason the symptoms it triggers seem a lot worse. Even though Prozac has this reputation for anger & rage, Zoloft just gets you way more agitated and sets of these nasty dysphoric manias in the bipolar. It turns out to be a very harsh way to discover that one is bipolar. The other SSRIs may trigger euphoric manias that will send you on spending sprees or marrying people you just meet, or they may trigger dysphoric manias that make you destroy all the furniture in a room, truly a toss of the coin. But with Zoloft (sertraline hydrochloride) the odds are heavily in favor of the dysphoric mania. That may be why the poor little Zoloft lozenge is not shilling Zoloft so heavily for depression, but for social anxiety, panic disorder and PMDD. Then again it could be that Zoloft is just testing better in studies for its other approved uses. Still, if you could make it to the party in the first place like the bouncing ball in the ads did, you don't need an SSRI, you just need therapy and coping skills to deal with your social anxiety. You need Zoloft or another SSRI if you break out in a cold sweat, start shaking and curl up in a fetal position at the mere thought of going to a party.

Manufacturer: Pfizer
Quote:
US Brand Name: Celexa


Other Brand Names: Cipramil (Australia & UK)

Generic Name: citalopram hydrobromide

Other Forms: Oral solution

Class: Antidepressant, specifically SSRI.
Read up on these sections if you haven't done so already, because they cover a lot of information about multiple medications that I'm not going to repeat on many pages. I'm just autistic that way about not repeating myself.

FDA Approved Use: Depression

Off-Label Uses: Panic/Anxiety, Bipolar Depression, ADD/ADHD, OCD, Chronic Fatigue, Fibromyalgia, Arthritis, Lupus, Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder, Eating Disorders, Autistic Spectrum Disorders

Celexa's pros and cons:

Pros: Works well on the combination of anxiety & depression, is a good med to switch to if Prozac doesn't work or poops out on you as you typically avoid the short-term side effects during the switch.

Cons: The weight gain is bad for an SSRI.



Celexa's side effects:

Typical Side Effects: The usual for SSRIs - headache, nausea, dry mouth, sweating, sleepiness or insomnia, and diarrhea or constipation, weight gain, loss of libido. Most everything but the weight gain and loss of libido usually goes away within a couple of weeks.

For tips on how to cope with these side effects, please see our side effects page.



Not So Common Side Effects: Tremor, acne, disruption in your menstrual cycle.

These may or may not happen to you don't, so don't be surprised one way or the other.

Freaky Rare Side Effects: Rectal hemorrhage. Hiccups that won't stop. Mouse had the unending hiccups. Really, she did.

Interesting Stuff Your Doctor Probably Won't Tell You: For whatever reason people switching from Prozac to Celexa seem to avoid repeat visits from many of the side effects common to SSRIs. So if you're going to switch from Prozac to Lexapro (the new & improved version of Celexa), you may want to go to Celexa first, then Lexapro. But only if you can get samples or your meds are covered by insurance.

Celexa's Dosage and How to Take Celexa: Initial dosage of 20mg a day that can be increased to 40mg a day after at least one week. You can go up to 60mg a day, although there is little evidence from the clinical trials to support effectiveness at that dosage. Like any SSRI I recommend starting out with 10mg and then increasing to 20mg after a week. If you don't feel anything go up to 30mg, but stay there until you've given it a try for a month, otherwise it'll just be a pain in the ass to stop it. Even at 30mg you'll know after a month if it's going to do something for you.

Days to Reach a Steady State: About a week.

When you're fully saturated with the medication and less prone to peaks and valleys of effects. You still might have peaks of effect after taking many meds, but with a lot of the meds you'll have fewer valleys after this point. In theory anyway.

How Long Celexa Takes to Work: Like all SSRIs anywhere from a couple days to over a month. If you don't feel any positive benefit after six weeks, then you should talk to your doctor about either another SSRI or trying a med that hits another neurotransmitter.

Celexa's Half-Life & Average Time to Clear Out of Your System: Half-life is 35 hours. So it's out of your system within 6-8 days.

How to Stop Taking Celexa: Your doctor should be recommending that you reduce your dosage by by 10-20mg a day every 6-8 days if you need to stop taking it if you need to stop taking it, if not more slowly than that. Make that 10-20mg a day every week just to make things easier on everyone. Based on the 35 hour half-life. For more information, please see the page on how to safely stop taking these crazy meds.
If you've worked your way up to a particular dosage, it's usually best to spend this many days at the next lowest dosage before going down the next lowest dosage before that and so forth. This is the least sucky way to avoid problems when stopping any psychiatric medication. Presuming you have the option of slowly tapering off them.

How Celexa Works In Your Brain: Like all SSRIs Celexa (citalopram hydrobromide) doesn't make you produce more serotonin, rather it makes your neurons soak for a longer period of time in the serotonin you already produce. Serotonin is one of the big three neurotransmitters responsible for depression, along with norepinephrine and dopamine. My wild-ass guess / rule of thumb is that imbalances of one or more of the three are responsible for 80% of the depression issues. It's all just a matter of figuring out exactly the extent of the tweaking and what neurotransmitters you exactly need to tweak.

Comments: Mouse gained some noticeable weight on Celexa, but not as much as on the TCAs or other meds. It did wonders for her complexion as well. She would also wake up at 5:30 every morning in a state of hypomania. As one of those freaky morning people, I could go along with that. Ultimately, like any other med that messes with serotonin, Celexa was a bust for her. Hypomania is just not good. However, for many people in the bipolar 2 part of the spectrum, Celexa has been found to be a helpful SSRI. For people with unipolar depression, OCD, and panic/anxiety, it's just like any other SSRI, it might be the one for you, it might not. You'll have to try it and see. It's pretty much been supplanted by its sibling Lexapro, which is showing to have better effects and fewer side effects than most SSRIs. Celexa's only real advantage over Lexapro is that its size and dosage makes its much easier to discontinue than Lexapro.

Manufacturers: Forest Pharmaceuticals, H. Lundbeck A/S
Quote:
US Brand Name: Lexapro
A link here will take you to the official website for the drug.

Other Brand Names: Cipralex (UK, Ireland and various European countries)

Generic Name: escitalopram oxalate

Other Forms: Oral solution

Class: Antidepressant, specifically SSRI.
Read up on these sections if you haven't done so already, because they cover a lot of information about multiple medications that I'm not going to repeat on many pages. I'm just autistic that way about not repeating myself.

FDA Approved Use: Depression, Generalized Anxiety Disorder

Off-Label Uses: Panic, Bipolar Depression, ADD/ADHD, OCD, Chronic Fatigue, Fibromyalgia, Arthritis, Lupus, Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder, Eating Disorders, Autistic Spectrum Disorders

Lexapro's pros and cons:
Pros: Better effects and lower chances for side effects than other SSRIs. When side effects do strike they tend to be less harsh. Rave reviews from the Panic/Anxiety community.

Cons: The dosage is such that discontinuation can be more difficult than with other SSRIs. Not because Lexapro is more addictive, it's not. Paxil (paroxetine hydrochloride) holds that honor (for true SSRIs, Effexor (venlafaxine hydrochloride) is not a true SSRI). It's just that you don't have many dosage options with Lexapro. The same goes with its use in bipolar, making it way too easy to trigger mania. Although to be fair, fewer people in the bipolar community reported manias when starting Lexapro (escitalopram oxalate) than with other SSRIs.

Lexapro's Typical Side Effects: The usual for SSRIs - headache, nausea, dry mouth, sweating, sleepiness or insomnia, and diarrhea or constipation, weight gain, loss of libido. Most everything but the weight gain and loss of libido usually goes away within a couple of weeks. The odds are just lower than the other SSRIs and the effects less severe, even the weight gain and sexual problems tend to be not as bad with Lexapro (escitalopram oxalate). When Lexapro (escitalopram oxalate) does hit you sexually it tends to be anorgasmia, i.e. you can't cum, no matter how much romance and/or porn is involved.

For tips on how to cope with these side effects, please see our side effects page.
These aren't all the side effects possible, just the most popular ones.

Lexapro's Not So Common Side Effects: Lethargy, apathy, and generally not giving a damn. I've also read several accounts of jaw tightening and clenching.
These may or may not happen to you don't, so don't be surprised one way or the other.

Lexapro's Freaky Rare Side Effects: Lexapro (escitalopram oxalate) hasn't been on the market long enough for the really freaky side effects to come out, so we're stuck with uncontrolled eye movement and excessive discharge of breast milk when there shouldn't be any breast milk at all. As in for both men and women. It's noted that in the clinical trials someone on Lexapro (escitalopram oxalate) complained that their muscle tone increased. There's no pleasing some people.

Interesting Stuff Your Doctor Probably Won't Tell You: Lexapro (escitalopram oxalate) hasn't been on the market long enough for anything really interesting to come to the surface yet.

Lexapro's Dosage and How to Take Lexapro: Initial dosage of 10mg a day that can be increased to 20mg a day after at least one week. That's it! A lot of people are starting out at 5mg a day (splitting the tablets in half) and increasing the dosage in 5mg increments for better control over effects and side effects, as well as discontinuation.

I recommend starting at 5mg and waiting at least two weeks before taking more than 10mg a day. The folks in the bipolar community who started at 5mg a day reported fewer issues with manias being triggered that way.

Days to Reach a Steady State: About a week.
When you're fully saturated with the medication and less prone to peaks and valleys of effects. You still might have peaks of effect after taking many meds, but with a lot of the meds you'll have fewer valleys after this point. In theory anyway.


How Long Lexapro Takes to Work: Like all SSRIs Lexapro starts to work anywhere from a couple days to over a month, but many who have tried other SSRIs report that Lexapro (escitalopram oxalate) kicks in faster than the competition, with about two weeks being reported frequently. If you don't feel any positive benefit after six weeks, then you should talk to your doctor about either another SSRI or trying a med that hits another neurotransmitter.


Half-Life & Average Time to Clear Out of Your System: Lexapro's half-life is 27-32 hours. It's out of your system in 6-8 days.

How to Stop Taking Lexapro: Your doctor should be recommending that you reduce your dosage by 5mg a day every 6-8 days if you need to stop taking it, if not more slowly than that. Based on the 27-32 hour half-life. For more information, please see the page on how to safely stop taking these crazy meds.
If you've worked your way up to a particular dosage, it's usually best to spend this many days at the next lowest dosage before going down the next lowest dosage before that and so forth. This is the least sucky way to avoid problems when stopping any psychiatric medication. Presuming you have the option of slowly tapering off them.

How Lexapro Works In Your Brain: Like all SSRIs Lexapro (escitalopram oxalate) doesn't make you produce more serotonin, rather it makes your neurons soak for a longer period of time in the serotonin you already produce. Serotonin is one of the big three neurotransmitters responsible for depression, along with norepinephrine and dopamine. My wild-ass guess / rule of thumb is that imbalances of one or more of the three are responsible for 80% of the depression issues. It's all just a matter of figuring out exactly the extent of the tweaking and what neurotransmitters you exactly need to tweak.

Chance that Lexapro Will Work and How Lexapro Compares to Other Meds: If you read the PI sheet you'll just see that for Major Depressive Disorder Lexapro (escitalopram oxalate) showed significantly greater mean improvement compared to placebo. But no hard numbers are given. Why? Because "significant" means somewhere in the neighborhood of 20%. That doesn't look to good. So you have about a 1 in 5 chance of it, or any SSRI, doing its job. Part of the problem is that serotonin isn't always the issue with someone's depression. I'll be covering how to figure out which chemicals and/or voltage channels you need to be tweaking in your brain in a future article to try to avoid the med-go-round. Another part of the low response rate is that sometimes these are the wrong meds entirely. SSRIs are for serious depression. Milder depression may require a milder medication, such as trazodone, or no medication at all.

I could find a study indicating that it's good to prevent relapses of major depressive disorder when compared to a placebo. Then again, so do many other meds. A review of cost and quality of life comparing it to SSRIs and Effexor (venlafaxine hydrochloride) in Europe had it coming out as being more cheaper to use with fewer side effects. Yet another review of Lundbeck's data combined with the limited published studies available claims that Lexapro (escitalopram oxalate) isn't that much better than Celexa (citalopram oxalate) after all.
Quote:
Drug Name: Luvox, Floxyfral, Faverin

Generic Name: fluvoxamine maleate

Other Forms:

Class: Anti-Obsessive, but it's really the first SSRI.
Read up on these sections if you haven't done so already, because they cover a lot of information about multiple medications that I'm not going to repeat on many pages. I'm just autistic that way about not repeating myself.

FDA Approved Use: Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

Off-Label Uses: Depression, Panic/Anxiety, Bipolar Depression, Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder, Eating Disorders - two studies, one big and one small indicate that SSRIs just aren't much good for eating disorders, Autistic Spectrum Disorders, PTSD

Luvox's pros and cons:

Pros: Proven as the best med for OCD. Generally less agitating than other SSRIs. Tends to work faster than other SSRIs except Lexapro (escitalopram oxalate).

Cons: Who the hell prescribes Luvox? There's just not much in the way of support from Solvay or anecdotal evidence about this drug. The lack of support is telling in Solvay's withdrawing the brand name med from the US market. The short half-life can make discontinuation difficult.

Luvox's side effects:

Typical Side Effects: The usual for SSRIs - headache, nausea, dry mouth, sweating, sleepiness or insomnia, and diarrhea or constipation, weight gain, loss of libido. Most everything but the weight gain and loss of libido usually goes away within a couple of weeks.

For tips on how to cope with these side effects, please see our side effects page.

Not So Common Side Effects: Worsening of symptoms, be it anxiety, depression or OCD. Even if you're taking Luvox for one thing you might get the symptoms of something else.

These may or may not happen to you don't, so don't be surprised one way or the other.

Freaky Rare Side Effects: Agoraphobia, fecal incontinence, priapism. Time to stay inside and make the freakiest scat video ever!

Interesting Stuff Your Doctor Probably Won't Tell You: First of all, if you smoke you'll increase the metabolism of Luvox by 25%. That's out of the PI sheet, and a recent study confirms it. So you'll get more out of it and it'll make discontinuation easier. Somehow that's apt for a med that is officially approved only for OCD, as nicotine is an effective treatment for OCD, so you'll get a synergistic effect going if you're willing to risk all the crap that comes with smoking. As always when tobacco is involved I recommend cigars - way more nicotine and far less added crap. Or pipes, as you can just get a small amount of tobacco as required, and still less crap. Once again, you can tell that I'm a freak.

Secondly mixing Luvox and benzodiazepines can be really tricky. With some, like Ativan (lorazepam), there's no problem at all. But with others, like Xanax (alprazolam) and Valium (diazepam), you wind up making either or both meds work much, much better. Surprise! But you don't know how much better, and it can vary from day to day, especially with Valium, so it's not a good idea. This is spelled out in the PI sheet, but double check with your doctor and pharmacist.

Finally, and this is news to me, mixing caffeine and Luvox can be intensely unpleasant. The first study back in 1996 states, "The results indicate that intake of caffeine during fluvoxamine treatment may lead to caffeine intoxication." Your one cup of joe will suddenly become like five cups, and the effects will last six times as long. These effects have been confirmed by subsequent studies, including one that shows these effects with just 10mg of fluvoxamine. Don't mix coffee and fluvoxamine! Thanks to one this site's readers for e-mailing the first study to me.

Luvox's Dosage and How to Take Luvox: Initial dose is 50 mg at bedtime, increased by 50 mg a day every four to seven days as needed until the maximum dose of 300 mg a day is reached. Like any SSRI I recommend starting out with 25mg and then increasing to 50mg after a week. If you don't feel anything go up to 100mg, but stay there until you've given it a try for a month, otherwise it'll just be a pain in the ass to stop it. Even at 100mg you'll know after a month if it's going to do something for you.

Days to Reach a Steady State: The steady state for Luvox is non-linear. That means if you change the dosage, the steady state gets hosed. So Solvay doesn't publish any steady state data. Figure at least a week, maybe two, after your last dosage adjustment.

When you're fully saturated with the medication and less prone to peaks and valleys of effects. You still might have peaks of effect after taking many meds, but with a lot of the meds you'll have fewer valleys after this point. In theory anyway.

How Long Luvox Takes to Work: Like all SSRIs anywhere from a couple days to over a month. If you don't feel any positive benefit after six weeks, then you should talk to your doctor about either another SSRI or trying a med that hits another neurotransmitter. However in all the studies referenced above, Luvox tends to work faster than most SSRIs.

Luvox's Half-Life & Average Time to Clear Out of Your System: 15.6 hours, the shortest of all true SSRIs.

How to Stop Taking Luvox: Your doctor should be recommending that you reduce your dosage 25-50mg every 4 days if you need to stop taking it. Because its half-life is so short and the steady state is non-linear, best to go for 25mg. Maybe even 12.5mg if the discontinuation seems harsh. I've found only one study online specific to fluvoxamine withdrawal, but there are several other references to it that aren't online. My numbers are based on the 15.6 hour half-life. You may want to stretch that out to a week just to make things easier, and have a prescription for two week's worth of 10mg of Prozac (fluoxetine) on hand just in case you do get discontinuation syndrome. For more information, please see the page on how to safely stop taking these crazy meds.
If you've worked your way up to a particular dosage, it's usually best to spend this many days at the next lowest dosage before going down the next lowest dosage before that and so forth. This is the least sucky way to avoid problems when stopping any psychiatric medication. Presuming you have the option of slowly tapering off them.

How Luvox Works In Your Brain: Like all SSRIs Luvox doesn't make you produce more serotonin, rather it makes your neurons soak for a longer period of time in the serotonin you already produce. Serotonin is one of the big three neurotransmitters responsible for depression, along with norepinephrine and dopamine. My wild-ass guess / rule of thumb is that imbalances of one or more of the three are responsible for 80% of the depression issues. It's all just a matter of figuring out exactly the extent of the tweaking and what neurotransmitters you exactly need to tweak.
Quote:
Drug Name: Paxil, Aropax, Paroxat,Paxetin, Seroxat

Generic Name: paroxetine hydrochloride

Other Forms: Paxil CR, oral suspension

Class: Antidepressant, specifically SSRI.
Read up on these sections if you haven't done so already, because they cover a lot of information about multiple medications that I'm not going to repeat on many pages. I'm just autistic that way about not repeating myself.

FDA Approved Uses: The immediate release form (vanilla Paxil) is approved for Major Depressive Disorder, Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, Panic Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, General Anxiety Disorder and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. The Controlled Release form (Paxil CR) is approved for only Major Depression and Panic Disorder.

Off-Label Uses: Premenstrual Syndrome & Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder (but watch out for sexual side effects). Eating Disorders. Fibromyalgia. Chronic Fatigue, Multiple Chemical Sensitivities (at least when they think it's all in your head). Bipolar Depression (this one study has it less apt to cause mania than Effexor (venlafaxine), although I can find plenty of case histories where mania was induced). Headaches. Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) (effective and cost effective). ADD/ADHD. Autistic Spectrum Disorders. Tourette's Disorder.

Paxil's pros and cons:
Pros: The data on the PI sheet for the immediate release version show it to be moderately effective for just about everything under the sun, hence its official approval for so many disorders instead of just off-label usage. The data for the CR version are much more vague, and you'll note it isn't approved for as many disorders.

Cons: Paxil (paroxetine hydrochloride) is the worst SSRI to stop taking. SSRI discontinuation syndrome for Paxil (paroxetine hydrochloride) is worse by far than any of the others. No, Effexor (venlafaxine) doesn't count, because it isn't an SSRI. It also has the worst sexual side effects, although the CR version tends to make the sexual side effects less harsh, the CR version is also less effective for a lot of disorders, hence its lack of approvals.

Paxil's Typical Side Effects: The usual for SSRIs - headache, nausea, dry mouth, sweating, sleepiness or insomnia, and diarrhea or constipation, weight gain, loss of libido. Most everything but the weight gain and loss of libido usually goes away within a couple of weeks. Paxil is notorious for having the worst impact on your libido of all SSRIs.

For tips on how to cope with these side effects, please see our side effects page.

Paxil's Not So Common Side Effects: Motion sickness/vertigo, food tasting weird, making the symptoms worse.
These may or may not happen to you don't, so don't be surprised one way or the other.

Paxil's Freaky Rare Side Effects: Complete loss of taste (like Gabitril (tiagabine) did to me), enlargement of skin, reflexes increased (some people are just never happy), tongue discoloration.
You aren't going to get these. I promise.

For all side effects, read the PI sheet.

Interesting Stuff Your Doctor Probably Won't Tell You: Paxil (paroxetine hydrochloride) is one of those meds that if you stop taking it and start up again, it won't work as well as it used to. Even if you stop for just a couple of days. You have to be totally med compliant with Paxil (paroxetine hydrochloride) or it's pointless. Symptoms may even worsen, which may have something to do with the rash of suicidal acts and ideation amongst adolescents on Paxil / Seroxat, as teenagers are as bad as the bipolar when it comes to being med compliant.

On the subject of discontinuing antidepressants, it turns out that their withdrawal can trigger mania. So you always have to be careful when using them if you're bipolar.

Paxil's Dosage and How to Take Paxil: Immediate release - the initial dose of Paxil (paroxetine hydrochloride) is 10mg for Panic Disorder and 20mg for all other disorders, taken in the morning in any event. The dose is increased 10 mg a week, as required, until it reaches a maximum of 20mg for General Anxiety, 40mg for PTSD, 50mg for Depression, and 60 mg for everything else.
Controlled Release - start at 25mg in the morning and work up by 12.5mg a week, as required, until a maximum of 62.5mg a day is reached.

As with all SSRIs I suggest staying at a fairly low dosage for the first four weeks. It sucks, but honestly, it will suck less that way. For the immediate release just start at 10mg for everything, go up to 20mg after a week if you need to. For depression you can go up to 30mg before your month is out, otherwise just hold where you are for a month, otherwise the discontinuation will suck for nothing. You'll know after a month if Paxil (paroxetine hydrochloride) will do anything for you or not, even at a lower dosage.

For the controlled release, start at 12.5mg, move up to 25mg after a week if need be. For depression you can move up to 37.5mg a week after that if you think it will do you any good, otherwise just hold out for a month to see if it works.

Days to Reach a Steady State: Good freaking luck pinning this one down. Seriously, this is a problem with Paxil (paroxetine hydrochloride), and is one of the reasons why the withdrawal is so bad. With the CR version you'll probably get a steady state in two weeks. With the immediate release Glaxo promises steady state in 10 days, but that was based on a study involving all of 15 men.
When you're fully saturated with the medication and less prone to peaks and valleys of effects. You still might have peaks of effect after taking many meds, but with a lot of the meds you'll have fewer valleys after this point. In theory anyway.

How Long Paxil Takes to Work: Like all SSRIs anywhere from a couple days to over a month. If you don't feel any positive benefit after six weeks, then you should talk to your doctor about either another SSRI or trying a med that hits another neurotransmitter.

Paxil's Half-Life & Average Time to Clear Out of Your System: For the CR version the mean average half-life is 15-20 hours. So it's out of your system in about 4-5 days.

Now, as for the immediate release version. I could not get a firm number on the half-life. The only information Glaxo published in the PI sheet came from a study of 15 men, and that gives a half-life of 21 hours. There's a shitload of contradictory information on the Internet ranging from 2-96 hours, with the consensus and the US Army agreeing on a 26-hour half-life. And we thought pinning down Lamictal's (lamotrigine) half-life was tough. But wait! 26 hours is the same as Lamictal's (lamotrigine) and Zoloft's (sertraline). Coincidence? Or did someone just pull a number out of their ass?

How to Stop Taking Paxil: Your doctor should be recommending that you reduce your of the CR dosage by 12.5mg every four days. You should probably make it five days because Paxil's discontinuation syndrome is so harsh. That means putting up with the suck-ass side effects for longer, but trust me, it really sucks less this way. Based on the 15-20 hour half-life. If your doctor says something that's slower than that, go for it! I'm all for slower discontinuations. Four to five days is the fastest you can step down the dosage. For more information, please see the page on how to safely stop taking these crazy meds.

This is part of the reason why the discontinuation for Paxil sucks more ass than any other SSRI (keep in mind that Effexor (venlafaxine) is not an SSRI and it has the reputation for the worst discontinuation syndrome.). If you can't pin down the half-life, you and your doctor can't work out an effective discontinuation schedule, and if the half-life varies wildly it's possible that if you do everything right on paper it's still going to suck when you actually discontinue Paxil! OK, so given the 21-26 hour half-life, that means for the immediate release version you are going to get a pill splitter and you are going to step down by 5mg a week. If you're still having problems with the last 5-10mg a day you can try switching to the oral suspension (the liquid form) to try going down a milligram at a time. There's also the option to switch to Prozac (fluoxetine) for a couple of weeks.
Quote:
Drug Name: Prozac, Erocap, Lorien, Lovan, Zactin

Generic Name: fluoxetine hydrochloride

Other Forms: Prozac Weekly, Sarafem (for PMDD), oral solution

Class: Antidepressant, specifically SSRI.
Read up on these sections if you haven't done so already, because they cover a lot of information about multiple medications that I'm not going to repeat on many pages. I'm just autistic that way about not repeating myself.

FDA Approved Uses: Major Depression, Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, Panic Disorder, Bulima Nervosa, Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder (as Sarafem). Prozac (fluoxetine hydrochloride) is the only SSRI (and modern antidepressant in general) approved for use by the under-18 set for depression, probably due to its long half-life and lower potency.

Off-Label Uses: Fibromyalgia, Arthritis, Chronic Fatigue, Multiple Sclerosis, Bipolar Depression, Lupus, Headaches, Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), ADD/ADHD, Premature Ejaculation, Autistic Spectrum Disorders

Prozac's pros and cons:
Pros: Prozac's long half-life makes the issue of med compliance a little less of a big deal, hence the approval for depressed teenagers. It also has studies backing it up for PMDD, by Lilly and independent researchers, including the Amen clinic, where I'm treated. You can see at the Amen Clinic's case studies in practice the more common form of PMDD that responds to SSRIs will respond to whichever SSRI you get along with the best. Prozac Weekly does have an advantage for certain forms of PMDD.

Cons: That really long half-life means it takes forever to wean yourself off of Prozac (fluoxetine hydrochloride) to avoid SSRI discontinuation syndrome. But only if the discontinuation syndrome hits you hard, which is fairly uncommon with Prozac (fluoxetine hydrochloride). In fact some more enlightened doctors will prescribe the liquid form to help wean patients off of other SSRIs and Effexor (venlafaxine). The sexual side effects, though, are pretty bad. For being the weakest of the SSRIs the side effects are pretty gnarly.

Prozac's side effects:

Typical Side Effects: The usual for SSRIs - headache, nausea, dry mouth, sweating, sleepiness or insomnia, and diarrhea or constipation, weight gain, loss of libido. Most everything but the weight gain and loss of libido usually goes away within a couple of weeks. With Prozac (fluoxetine hydrochloride) it's a coin toss as to losing or gaining weight. Sometimes it will just kill your appetite.

For tips on how to cope with these side effects, please see our side effects page.
These aren't all the side effects possible, just the most popular ones.

Not So Common Side Effects: Rash, 'flu-like symptoms, anger/rage.
These may or may not happen to you don't, so don't be surprised one way or the other.

Freaky Rare Side Effects: Bleeding gums, amnesia, anti-social reaction (oh, come on, like we're not anti-social already), herpes (again, blaming the med for an STD), excessive hair growth, engorged breasts, involuntary tongue protrusion (in one 77-year-old woman who stopped sticking her tongue out at everyone after they stopped giving her Prozac (fluoxetine hydrochloride)).

Interesting Stuff Your Doctor Probably Won't Tell You: Prozac (fluoxetine hydrochloride) has been found to make a lot of other drugs work better. Great, huh? Not always, as with some meds it can be to the point of overdose. But it was that effect that lead to the breakthrough of the antipsychotic & antidepressant cocktail to treat bipolar depression. Anyway, Tegretol (carbamazepine) could suddenly get toxic on you and Xanax (alprazolam) could knock you out if you add Prozac (fluoxetine hydrochloride) to them, or add them to Prozac (fluoxetine hydrochloride), so be careful and always check your drug-drug interactions! A big part of this is the usual pharmacokinetic stuff of liver enzymes being able to deal with only so much, and Prozac (fluoxetine hydrochloride) gives your liver a bit of a workout. But that doesn't explain the entire effect of all of the drug-drug interactions. There's some pharmacodynamic (how meds work in your brain) stuff going on as well.
Prozac (fluoxetine hydrochloride) isn't such a hot idea for anyone with diabetes, and not because of potential weight gain, rather it messes with your glycemic control.

Prozac's Dosage and How to Take Prozac: I'm just going to cover the dosages for adults. Even though Prozac (fluoxetine hydrochloride) is the only modern antidepressant approved for kids, with kids it's still a lot trickier.

Depression - 20mg in the morning, increasing by 20mg a day after at least a week, taken either in the morning or at noon until a maximum of 80mg a day is reached.

OCD & Bulima - 20mg in the morning, increasing by 20mg a day after at least a week, taken either in the morning or at noon until a maximum of 60mg a day is reached.

Panic - 10mg in the morning. Increase to 20mg, either all in the morning or split into morning and noon. Hold there for awhile before increasing. Although you can go up to 60mg a day, few people responded to anything above 20mg a day.

Like any SSRI I recommend starting out with half the recommended dosage (except for Panic, that's as low as you can get) and then increasing to 20mg after a week. If you don't feel anything go up to 30mg, but stay there until you've given it a try for a month, otherwise it'll just be a pain in the ass to stop it. Even at 30mg you'll know after a month if it's going to do something for you.

Prozac Weekly - You just take the one capsule a week for everything. That's it.


Days to Reach a Steady State: Four to five weeks.
When you're fully saturated with the medication and less prone to peaks and valleys of effects. You still might have peaks of effect after taking many meds, but with a lot of the meds you'll have fewer valleys after this point. In theory anyway.

How Long Prozac Takes to Work: Like all SSRIs anywhere from a couple days to over a month. If you don't feel any positive benefit after six weeks, then you should talk to your doctor about either another SSRI or trying a med that hits another neurotransmitter. Because of the long time it takes to reach a steady state, you might want to give Prozac (fluoxetine hydrochloride) a full two months. Just don't keep upping the dosage every week until then, otherwise it will be much harder and take much longer to stop taking Prozac.

Prozac's Half-Life & Average Time to Clear Out of Your System: Prozac (fluoxetine hydrochloride) has the longest half-life of any med I've written up, 9.3 days. That's why there's such an animal as Prozac Weekly. Thus it takes 45 days to clear out of your system.

How to Stop Taking Prozac: Your doctor should be recommending that you reduce your dosage by 10-20mg a day every week if you need to stop taking it, if not more slowly than that. For more information, please see the page on how to safely stop taking these crazy meds. Unlike other medications, the time to step down from Prozac isn't based on half-life, it's based on anecdotal evidence. In other words, people's experiences. Now, if you start to experience SSRI discontinuation syndrome once you're down around 30-40mg a day, then you will have to look at reducing your dosage by 10mg a day every month. But only if you're prone to the worst effects of discontinuation syndrome. Which is unusual with Prozac (fluoxetine hydrochloride). Here's where you really have to balance the suckiness of what you're dealing with in the way of side effects or whatever vs. SSRI discontinuation syndrome. And if you're taking Prozac Weekly you'll have to switch to the regular flavor to step down, as weekly is one size fits all. However, that extra-long half-life tends to make discontinuation less harsh, so you'll probably be able to to get off of Prozac (fluoxetine hydrochloride) a lot sooner. In fact switching to Prozac (fluoxetine hydrochloride) from another SSRI or Effexor (venlafaxine) is a good way of dealing with the discontinuation syndrome of the meds with the shorter half-lives. As Prozac comes in a liquid form, you can always switch to that to wean yourself off the last bit really slowly, mg by mg.

If you've worked your way up to a particular dosage, it's usually best to spend this many days at the next lowest dosage before going down the next lowest dosage before that and so forth. This is the least sucky way to avoid problems when stopping any psychiatric medication. Presuming you have the option of slowly tapering off them.

How Prozac Works In Your Brain: Like all SSRIs Prozac (fluoxetine hydrochloride) doesn't make you produce more serotonin, rather it makes your neurons soak for a longer period of time in the serotonin you already produce. Serotonin is one of the big three neurotransmitters responsible for depression, along with norepinephrine and dopamine. My wild-ass guess / rule of thumb is that imbalances of one or more of the three are responsible for 80% of the depression issues. It's all just a matter of figuring out exactly the extent of the tweaking and what neurotransmitters you exactly need to tweak. Prozac (fluoxetine hydrochloride) is the weakest of the SSRIs, and has the longest half-life, a combination that makes it the best SSRI to start with and the only one approved for use with kids.

Chances Prozac Will Work and How Prozac Compares to Other Meds: If you read the PI sheet you'll just see that for Major Depressive Disorder Prozac (fluoxetine hydrochloride) produced a significantly higher rate of response and remission. But no hard numbers are given. Why? Because "significant" means somewhere in the neighborhood of 20%. That doesn't look to good. So you have about a 1 in 5 chance of it, or any SSRI, doing its job. Part of the problem is that serotonin isn't always the issue with someone's depression. I'll be covering how to figure out which chemicals and/or voltage channels you need to be tweaking in your brain in a future article to try to avoid the med-go-round. Another part of the low response rate is that sometimes these are the wrong meds entirely. SSRIs are for serious depression. Milder depression may require a milder medication, such as trazodone, or no medication at all.

Comments: First approved by the FDA to treat depression in December of 1987.
You know what can really suck? When you've got someone who is all bipolar and hypersexual in a relationship with someone who has Major Depressive Disorder and takes Prozac (fluoxetine hydrochloride) for it, only to have her libido and all sexual response completely eliminated. Can you spell "issues"? I knew you could.

And in other Prozac (fluoxetine hydrochloride) experiences, Mouse was in the Clinical Trials for Prozac (fluoxetine hydrochloride), way back when it was the first SSRI in the US (Luvox (fluvoxamine maleate) predates it in Europe). If and when she feels up to it, and her memory is together enough, she can report her side effects that give you the odds as to what your side effects will be. I'll bet folding money that hers was the anti-social reaction reported above. They probably couldn't believe that someone was that anti-social and it had to be the drug that caused it.

Prozac (fluoxetine hydrochloride) is the only SSRI and modern antidepressant above for use for anyone under 18, and for good reason. Its long half-life makes compliance less of an issue. If your kid happens to miss a day's dose now and then, it's not that big a deal. Whereas with Paxil (paroxetine hydrochloride) and Effexor (venlafaxine) missing doses for even one day can start the hell that is SSRI discontinuation syndrome, and they have the worst instances of it. The syndrome is bad enough for adults, but would be beyond a nightmare for kids. See the SSRI page for more details on the vicious cycle kids can get into and how Prozac (fluoxetine hydrochloride) avoids it with its long half-life. Also by being the weakest of the SSRIs Prozac (fluoxetine hydrochloride) keeps kids from getting too much serotonin, which is also a huge problem. Serotonin syndrome is potentially fatal, and while giving kids a med like Paxil (paroxetine hydrochloride) is unlikely to be fatal in of itself, it will be suck-ass enough to cause the kids either start or ramp-up self-injurious or suicidal behavior because they are now feeling a hell of a lot worse from the meds they're taking that everyone tells them are supposed to be making them feel better.

Hell, even with adults Prozac (fluoxetine hydrochloride) is the best med to start with if serotonin is the prime suspect in the chemical imbalance for the very same reasons. While its side effects may suck more than the other SSRIs, even for being the weakest SSRI on the market, if you're doing the med-go-round method of figuring out which way to fix your brain (and that's still pretty much the standard way of doing it, unfortunately), trying Prozac (fluoxetine hydrochloride) first is the safest way to go. The discontinuation syndrome sucks so much less with Prozac (fluoxetine hydrochloride). The risk of making things much worse is far lower with Prozac (fluoxetine hydrochloride).

You have two ways to go when choosing your first SSRI:

Fewer side effects and faster effect - then you want Lexapro (escitalopram oxalate).

Less chance of just plain messing you up - you want Prozac (fluoxetine hydrochloride).

Manufacturer: Elli Lilly
Originally compiled by Jerod Poore for his own fantastic site (unfortunately our rules do not allow linking to this site).

Post Quality Reviews:
good info
very informative
Interesting and informative. Good post!
Helpful! A great compilation of some of the best psych med info out there for patients.
Brilliant info.
i wish the doc had given me this in the first place
One of the coolest things I read in a while. Excellent mentions for the uncommon side effects and profile of each drug.
Highly informative. Nice job.
very informative I like the detail
WOW THE VERY BEST POST FOR MOST SSRI MEDS

Last edited by Micklemouse; 30-01-2007 at 12:54. Reason: Link to other Forum removed, credit given to original author & quotes added to aid reading
  #2  
Old 18-03-2007, 19:17
OccularFantasm OccularFantasm is offline
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Re: Low down on some of the most common anti-depressant med's....

SWIM has a great deal of experiance with pharmacueticals. As far as antidepressants, swim has tried celexa only to find it mad swim very very sick and induced a migrane. With Zoloft, SWIM found results similar to having a few beers mixed with amphetamines. Then for a while SWIM was on methylphenidate while on zoloft. Same effect except jumpier and noticable strain on the heart. SWIM found as far as euphoria and psychotropic effects go that zoloft mixed with a blunt and a few shots made SWIM trip harder than he had ever in his life(at that time, 2nd hrdest overall). This mixture also causes huge dehydration, as SWIM had to crawl from the toilet across the rug and climb up a huge rocky muontain with a sink atop. After desperatly drinking water from swims hand the trip faded. SWIM advises that this combonation is very dangerous and much caution should be used for anyone attempting to do this. Alos the trip was markedly different than most trips. SWIM for once saw only stuff thatyw asnt there, as opposed to just seeing some colors and such. SWIM has only tripped harder after smoking a hit of laced buds which induced swims world tp turn pink and black, and have obvious dissociative effects. Also swims sense of sound was quite unique, as he was atr a concert and coulndt hear the music. Swim hopes this may help.

Research has also shown that with zoloft mixed with tiny doses of lsd causes all side effects to dissapate.
I know thats not related to what i was saying before, but i feel it belongs in this thread, as it specifically relates to common antidepressant medications.
  #3  
Old 18-03-2007, 19:19
OccularFantasm OccularFantasm is offline
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Re: Low down on some of the most common anti-depressant med's....

I couldn't find the edit button, so I am sorry for the above typos.
  #4  
Old 20-09-2008, 05:19
vantranist vantranist is offline
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Re: Low down on some of the most common anti-depressant med's....

This info needs to be checked... Some of it is wrong to say the least.

Celexa for one is known as an SSRI that causes the least weight gain.

Prozac, and zoloft seem to be the worst for weight gain.
  #5  
Old 20-09-2008, 07:22
Jatelka Jatelka is offline
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Re: Low down on some of the most common anti-depressant med's....

^^^ If there's misinformation here then can you correct it?
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Old 21-09-2008, 04:12
vantranist vantranist is offline
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Re: Low down on some of the most common anti-depressant med's....

I only read through the Celexa part, but if the main "con" of the drug is listed wrong im sure there is plenty more inaccurate info.

Whats the point of a sticky with wrong info... People look to stickys and count on them being reliable.
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Old 30-09-2008, 16:48
dreamstodiffer dreamstodiffer is offline
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Re: Low down on some of the most common anti-depressant med's....

Paxil's great, (sarcasm here) I am sorry I have ever started the stuff, I am perscribed 60 mg of paxil, 300 of wellbutrin, and a couple of other non ssri's to deal with the side effects of these ssri's. I would suggest take anything but paxil if it even helps in the slightest. Keep in mind I started taking paxil CR 12.5 mg at 20. Then for like a year the clear the CR from the market and I was w/o for a bit. HELL. Then was perscribed reg release paxil 20 mg. I have been slowly increasing to 60mg, I am 26 now, if you calll that slowly. My doctors (yes plural) want me off the stuff, and hey I want to get pregnant sometime, I was on Prozac for like a month last year to try and quit paxil. Never Again! Jesus, Now I get panicy even thinking about going w/o it. It seems to be the worse ssri to get addicted too. Heh, I takes meds for disorders and meds for my meds.
Bottom line, I would suggest trying ANYTHING and EVERYTHING before resorting to paxil, even though it is very effctive, I may be on it for the rest of my life. And if I miss a dose like in an hour i wanna jump off a bridge, for real, the mania and depression drives my certifiabley insane.
Sorry for preaching, I just don't want anyone else on this path
Also I have no sex drive and gained 200+ pounds on paxil.
And I still cut no matter what.
  #8  
Old 07-01-2009, 02:32
e4rolls e4rolls is offline
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Re: Low down on some of the most common anti-depressant med's....

Quote:
Originally Posted by Psych0naut View Post
In medical doses it's safe to take amphetamines together with SSRI's. Taking methamphetamine is a lot riskier, possibly even in medical doses, since methamphetamine is a potent serotonin agonist while regular amphetamine is not.
Thank you, an actual non-biased person on this site that does'nt demonize SSRI's and stimulant prescriptions and makes actual sense. Sweet!
  #9  
Old 14-01-2009, 21:05
lloydsLSD lloydsLSD is offline
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Re: Low down on some of the most common anti-depressant med's....

How many people who have had bad experiences with SSRI's, or write negative stuff about them, have actually used them without consuming anything else besides?

My friend was depressed for a long time and he tried Prosac and other anti-depressants but they didn't agree with him, or help at all. But that was probably because of my friends alcohol and drug intakes at the same time. But now he is on just 10mg of Cipralex daily and the benefit is massive. He can look on the positive side of life now and he is much more positive about his life.

One negative aspect for him is that he doesn't care about anything as much and finds it hard to get motivated.
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Old 08-02-2009, 01:40
lloydsLSD lloydsLSD is offline
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Re: Low down on some of the most common anti-depressant med's....

It seems like doctors in the US are much more relaxed about giving out medication to people. From reading the posts on here many young people in America are on cocktails of different medications that they shouldn't really be on. And at higher doses than what's given in the UK.

I'm not bashing anyone but somethings not right when you have youngsters addicted to Adderall and sleeping pills, and then complaining that their anti-depressant medications don't work! I'd bet most of the doctors wouldn't even prescribe the medications if the patient was honest with them.

EDIT: I didn't word that very well, sorry. But I know from experience that anti-depressants can be life savers and it bugs me that the spoilt people who get sick due to their own drug/alcohol misuse can blame it on the anti-depressants, when they are not even depressed in the first place!

Last edited by lloydsLSD; 08-02-2009 at 01:54.
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Old 09-03-2009, 05:01
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Re: Low down on some of the most common anti-depressant med's....

Was on the injection for a wile, like 5 months. Than the doc prescribed Venlafaxine and Arapiprazole, .... was using for a wile, and than on and off, and now I am off it about few weeks. I had some really bad side effects. And getting of made me eat like crazy. So, I've put on,..... (
now I am trying to loose it. Still don't feel the best, still quite down, staying in doors, don't feel like getting out of bed, .... and because I've put on weight made me feel more insecure. Still don't feel right in the head somethimes, and I blame the meds.
I feel that these legal drugs, medication, is very dangeous, more than some ilegal staff. Even cocain wouldn't mess your brain up like mixing of these anti-depressans and the ones for cycosis, cycotic depresson!! Ever since I started taking these, I don't feel myself again, and am worried will I ever be myself again?! I want my brain back!! I used to be happy!!

Guysfriend added 8 Minutes and 10 Seconds later...

Me too, I can't really get motivated!! I have a kid, and it still doesn't motivtes me. I don't feel like anything much!

Last edited by Guysfriend; 09-03-2009 at 05:01. Reason: Automerged Doublepost
  #12  
Old 12-07-2009, 04:43
heroineADDICT heroineADDICT is offline
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Re: Low down on some of the most common anti-depressant med's....

it doesnt mention mirtazepine or is it just about SSRIs
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Old 23-07-2009, 10:00
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Re: Low down on some of the most common anti-depressant med's....

Can loss of libido be permeant for elexa?
  #14  
Old 24-07-2009, 11:55
dr ACE dr ACE is offline
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Re: Low down on some of the most common anti-depressant med's....

loss of libido is not a permanent side effect with most anti-depressants it will go back to normal after a while month or two
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Old 27-07-2009, 06:01
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Re: Low down on some of the most common anti-depressant med's....

thank you!
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Old 09-12-2009, 01:51
Evenphatter Evenphatter is offline
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Re: Low down on some of the most common anti-depressant med's....

i don't take anything illegal but am on prozac and propanol for anxiety. They have saved my life i have no ndoubt. however i do yawn an awful lot and gurn and twitch...i have no doubt that these very legal and socially acceptable drugs are as potentially damaging (and useful perhaps) as illegal substances. Apologies if not felt adding to discussion...just my half pennorth (as my gran would say)
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Old 10-12-2009, 00:40
Rin_Weh Rin_Weh is offline
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Re: Low down on some of the most common anti-depressant med's....

SWIM posted something here re: effexor withdrawals etc...along with some links to experiences.
Why aren't they here or are posts with links looked over by a moderator first.
Don't know if SWIM's supposed to ask here but since this is the topic and thread they were posted in she's wondering why they aren't here.
  #18  
Old 30-06-2010, 04:19
Kalendren Kalendren is offline
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Re: Low down on some of the most common anti-depressant med's....

SWIM took Prozac before being prescribed Ativan, and it did nothing. Literally. For SWIM, it had no effect whatsoever on his depression and anxiety. He experienced the annoying, bad side effects, like weight gain and nausea, but none of the ones that helped. He took Prozac for about a year before finally telling his doctor that it wasn't doing shit. SWIM was weaned off Prozac and eventually given Ativan, which works much better, though it still doesn't work all that well in SWIM's opinion.

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I was also prescribed Prozac with no effect and then Zoloft but that didn't help either. After that I basically said fuck it; I never liked having to take anti-depressants anyways.
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Old 29-04-2011, 16:15
Hardy Bucks Hardy Bucks is offline
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Re: Low down on some of the most common anti-depressant med's....

what about mirtazapine, anyone else on it?
  #20  
Old 27-06-2012, 07:18
Zoe_27 Zoe_27 is offline
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Re: Low down on some of the most common anti-depressant med's....

I believe this information came from the CrazyMeds website. The author, Jerod Poore, along with many of the site's members are patients with a great deal of knowledge on psych meds. The information there is taken from a written source (I believe a book by drs.), as well as anecdotal accounts from patients, as much of the published info comes from the pharmaceutical companies that make the drugs, and is frequently biased. Clinical studies can be manipulated to produce certain outcomes, while some information is played up and other, less flattering findings, may be down played. As the saying goes, your mileage may vary. One person's savior can be another person's hell.
  #21  
Old 04-10-2012, 18:35
kimmybbbyeah kimmybbbyeah is offline
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Re: Low down on some of the most common anti-depressant med's....

I waa put on effexor xr 11 years ago after one panic attack. Five years ago i decided i no longer needed it, and am still trying to get off this teerible drug. The withdrawal is.worse than ive ever felt from any street drug.
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Old 22-08-2015, 04:11
dan p dan p is offline
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Re: Low down on some of the most common anti-depressant med's....

Quote:
Originally Posted by dreamstodiffer View Post
paxil's great, (sarcasm here) i am sorry i have ever started the stuff, i am perscribed 60 mg of paxil, 300 of wellbutrin, and a couple of other non ssri's to deal with the side effects of these ssri's. I would suggest take anything but paxil if it even helps in the slightest. Keep in mind i started taking paxil cr 12.5 mg at 20. Then for like a year the clear the cr from the market and i was w/o for a bit. Hell. Then was perscribed reg release paxil 20 mg. I have been slowly increasing to 60mg, i am 26 now, if you calll that slowly. My doctors (yes plural) want me off the stuff, and hey i want to get pregnant sometime, i was on prozac for like a month last year to try and quit paxil. Never again! Jesus, now i get panicy even thinking about going w/o it. It seems to be the worse ssri to get addicted too. Heh, i takes meds for disorders and meds for my meds.
Bottom line, i would suggest trying anything and everything before resorting to paxil, even though it is very effctive, i may be on it for the rest of my life. And if i miss a dose like in an hour i wanna jump off a bridge, for real, the mania and depression drives my certifiabley insane.
Sorry for preaching, i just don't want anyone else on this path
also i have no sex drive and gained 200+ pounds on paxil.
And i still cut no matter what.
why not trying swaping to prozac, men. Give it a try. Workes good for me after trying several ones, including paxil, wichs make me psycothic after my dose was cut off....
  #23  
Old 25-01-2016, 06:49
kellivlem kellivlem is offline
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Re: Low down on some of the most common anti-depressant med's....

Response to guysfriend: I was diagnosed bipolar mixed several years ago. I've been on 16 different antidepressant meds to aleviate the symptoms I experience and the only one that has worked at least 75 to 85 percent of the time is LATUDA. If your feeling hopeless by the ones you've tried and has failed you may want to at least consider this antidepressant. It took about ten days for it to have positive effects.

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antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, ssri adverse effects, ssri side effects, ssris, tricyclic antidepressants

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