1. Dear Drugs-Forum readers: We are a small non-profit that runs one of the most read drug information & addiction help websites in the world. We serve over 4 million readers per month, and have costs like all popular websites: servers, hosting, licenses and software. To protect our independence we do not run ads. We take no government funds. We run on donations which average $25. If everyone reading this would donate $5 then this fund raiser would be done in an hour. If Drugs-Forum is useful to you, take one minute to keep it online another year by donating whatever you can today. Donations are currently not sufficient to pay our bills and keep the site up. Your help is most welcome. Thank you.
    PLEASE HELP

A Brief History of Cannabis Policies in Spain (1968-2003) (Gamela et al, 2004)

A Brief History of Cannabis Policies in Spain (1968-2003) (Gamela et al, 2004)

  1. Jatelka
    Journal of Drug Issues, Summer, 2004, Vol.34(3), p.623(38)

    Gamella, Juan F. ; Rodrigo, Maria Luisa Jimenez

    Spain was one of the first countries in Europe to decriminalize drug use and one of the last to embrace harm reduction. As such, Spain's drug policies often appear to be rather contradictory. In this paper we will review the current status of drug laws and the major drug policies that have been implemented in Spain over the last 25 years concerning cannabis; their demographic, political, and economic contexts; and their apparent consequences. We will follow a chronological approach that outlines every major change that occurred during that period while trying to provide some sociopolitical background. We have divided the period under study into four major phases. Each phase addresses a major political change or shift in the social response to drug-related problems. In this account, we will apply to cannabis policies the conceptual distinctions introduced by MacCoun and Reuter in their recent revision of alternative drug policies (2001), especially their tripartite division between punitive, depenalizing, and legalizing regimes and the associated processes of promotion and commercialization. One essential question that concerns the Spanish case is the relationship between legal changes, their implementation, and long-term oscillations in consumption rates.