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A case of heroin overdose reversed by sublingually administered buprenorphine/naloxone (Suboxone®).

A case of heroin overdose reversed by sublingually administered buprenorphine/naloxone (Suboxone®).

  1. ex-junkie
    Welsh C., Sherman S. G., Tobin K. E. (2008). A case of heroin overdose reversed by sublingually administered buprenorphine/naloxone (suboxone®). Addiction, 103, 1226–8.


    Article first published online: 28 JUN 2008
    DOI: 10.1111/j.1360-0443.2008.02244.x

    ABSTRACT

    Background Opioid overdose is amajor source of morbidity and mortality in injection drug users in the United States
    and many other countries. Case description A case is described in which buprenorphine/naloxone (Suboxone®) was administered sublingually to reverse a heroin overdose. Conclusions Sublingually administered buprenorphine/
    naloxone might be used as a means to reverse opioid overdose.

Recent Reviews

  1. Mindless
    Mindless
    5/5,
    Version: 2011-04-04
    This is a most interesting case report. The potential of buprenorphine in the treatment of overdose is also apparent in the phenomenon of precipitated withdrawal, where the high affinity/low intrinsic opioid activity buprenorphine molecule displaces the lower affinity/high intrinsic activity opioids, thereby precipitating withdrawal.

    Naloxone is not active as an opioid antagonist when taken orally or sublingually, it seems that this only applies to injection. Intravenous is the optimum route, but intramuscular and subcutaneous injection may be given if IV is not possible. As such, my guess is that the effective treatment may have been solely due to the effects of buprenorphine.
    [URL="http://www.drugs-forum.com/forum/local_links.php?action=jump&catid=120&id=12375"]
    It is worth reading the entry on Preciptated withdrawal. What it is. How to avoid it. [/URL] These two documents present opposite sides of the same coin and make good complementary reading.