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‘A Quiet Revolution: Drug Decriminalization Policies in Practice Across the Globe’ (Ari Rosmarin

‘A Quiet Revolution: Drug Decriminalization Policies in Practice Across the Globe’ (Ari Rosmarin

  1. Mindless
    The report 'A Quiet Revolution' examines effective and 'hollow' decriminalisation initiatives from around the globe. Adverse implications of current drug laws are shown to reduce educational, employment, and travel prospects, as well as fundamental rights such as voting. A number of conerns are raised, such as police abuses of the spirit of the law, detention centres, and the potential for abuse of police discretion in determining quantities that constitute trafficking. The document makes recommendations for effective decriminalisation models, the emphasis is on treatment rather than criminalisation, as well as principles such as judicial review of police decision. The report ends by saying:


    “More research is needed; governments and academics must invest more in researching which policy models are the most effective in reducing drug harms and achieving just and healthy policy outcomes. More and better data will bolster the existing research and provide a sound foundation on which to build and design drug policies of the future.”


    There are two more reports to follow, based on UK data of disproportionate policing and prosecution, and the finanicial cost of this policing. It's well worth reading the report in full, especially as it allows readers to have a look at the national and global situation. The reoprt is also packed with useful references and citations. I'm not expecting imminent change either in my home country or globally, but the progress and initiatives that have taken place so far are (hopefully) indicative of a 'Quiet Revolution' that has been brewing since the 1970s. What follows are some excerpts from the report.