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Activation of Adenosine A1 Receptors Reduces Anxiety-Like Behaviour During Acute Ethanol Withdrawal

Activation of Adenosine A1 Receptors Reduces Anxiety-Like Behaviour During Acute Ethanol Withdrawal

  1. Jatelka
    Neuropsychopharmacology: official publication of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology, 2006, Vol.31(10),

    Prediger, Rui D S ; Da Silva, George E ; Batista, Luciano C ; Bittencourt, Alvorita L ; Takahashi, Reinaldo N

    Abstract
    Elevated signs of anxiety are observed in both humans and rodents during withdrawal from chronic as well as acute ethanol exposure, and it represents an important motivational factor for ethanol relapse. Several reports have suggested the involvement of brain adenosine receptors in different actions produced by ethanol such as motor incoordination and hypnotic effects. In addition, we have recently demonstrated that adenosine A1 receptors modulate the anxiolytic-like effect induced by ethanol in mice. In the present study, we evaluated the potential of adenosine A1 and A2A receptor agonists in reducing the anxiety-like behavior during acute ethanol withdrawal (hangover) in mice. Animals received a single intraperitoneal administration of saline or ethanol (4g/kg) and were tested in the elevated plus maze after an interval of 0.5-24 h. The results indicated that hangover-induced anxiety was most pronounced between 12 and 18 h after ethanol administration, as indicated by a significant reduction in the exploration of the open arms of the maze. At this time interval, ethanol was completely cleared. The acute administration of 'nonanxiolytic' doses of adenosine and the selective adenosine A1 receptor agonist 2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CCPA), but not the adenosine A2A receptor agonist N6-[2-(3,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-2-(2-methylphenyl)ethyl]adenosine (DPMA), at the onset of peak withdrawal (18 h), reduced this anxiogenic-like response. In addition, the effect of CCPA on the anxiety-like behavior of ethanol hangover was reversed by pretreatment with the selective adenosine A1 receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX). These results reinforce the notion of the involvement of adenosine receptors in the anxiety-like responses and indicate the potential of adenosine A1 receptor agonists to reduce the anxiogenic effects during ethanol withdrawal.