1. Dear Drugs-Forum readers: We are a small non-profit that runs one of the most read drug information & addiction help websites in the world. We serve over 4 million readers per month, and have costs like all popular websites: servers, hosting, licenses and software. To protect our independence we do not run ads. We take no government funds. We run on donations which average $25. If everyone reading this would donate $5 then this fund raiser would be done in an hour. If Drugs-Forum is useful to you, take one minute to keep it online another year by donating whatever you can today. Donations are currently not sufficient to pay our bills and keep the site up. Your help is most welcome. Thank you.
    PLEASE HELP

Acute and long-term effects of MDMA on cerebral dopamine biochemistry and function (2004)

Acute and long-term effects of MDMA on cerebral dopamine biochemistry and function (2004)

  1. Jatelka
    Psychopharmacology (Berl) 2004 May;173(3-4):249-63.

    Colado MI, O'Shea E, Green AR

    RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: The majority of experimental and clinical studies on the pharmacology of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy) tend to focus on its action on 5-HT biochemistry and function. However, there is considerable evidence for MDMA having marked acute effects on dopamine release. Furthermore, while MDMA produces long-term effects on 5-HT neurones in most species examined, in mice its long-term effects appear to be restricted to the dopamine system. The objective of this review is to examine the actions of MDMA on dopamine biochemistry and function in mice, rats, guinea pigs, monkeys and humans. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: MDMA appears to produce a major release of dopamine from its nerve endings in all species investigated. This release plays a significant role in the expression of many of the behaviours that occur, including behavioural changes, alterations of the mental state in humans and the potentially life-threatening hyperthermia that can occur. While MDMA appears to be a selective 5-HT neurotoxin in most species examined (rats, guinea pigs and primates), it is a selective dopamine neurotoxin in mice. Selectivity may be a consequence of what neurotoxic metabolites are produced (which may depend on dosing schedules), their selectivity for monoamine nerve endings, or the endogenous free radical trapping ability of specific nerve endings, or both. We suggest more focus be made on the actions of MDMA on dopamine neurochemistry and function to provide a better understanding of the acute and long-term consequences of using this popular recreational drug.