1. Dear Drugs-Forum readers: We are a small non-profit that runs one of the most read drug information & addiction help websites in the world. We serve over 4 million readers per month, and have costs like all popular websites: servers, hosting, licenses and software. To protect our independence we do not run ads. We take no government funds. We run on donations which average $25. If everyone reading this would donate $5 then this fund raiser would be done in an hour. If Drugs-Forum is useful to you, take one minute to keep it online another year by donating whatever you can today. Donations are currently not sufficient to pay our bills and keep the site up. Your help is most welcome. Thank you.
    PLEASE HELP

Acute modafinil exposure reduces daytime sleepiness in abstinent methamphetamine-dependent volunteer

Acute modafinil exposure reduces daytime sleepiness in abstinent methamphetamine-dependent volunteer

  1. Calliope
    The International Journal of Neuropsychopharmacology, 2012, Vol.15(9), pp.1241-1249

    Mahoney, James J ; Jackson, Brian J ; Kalechstein, Ari D ; De La Garza, Richard ; Chang, Lee C ; Newton, Thomas F

    Abstract
    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of acute, oral modafinil (200 mg) exposure on daytime sleepiness in methamphetamine (Meth)-dependent individuals. Eighteen Meth-dependent subjects were enrolled in a 7-d inpatient study and were administered placebo or modafinil on day 6 and the counter condition on day 7 (randomized) of the protocol. Subjects completed several subjective daily assessments (such as the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Beck Depression Inventory and visual analogue scale) throughout the protocol as well as objective assessments on days 5–7, when the Multiple Sleep Latency Test was performed. The results of the current study suggest that short-term abstinence from Meth is associated with increased daytime sleepiness and that a single dose of 200 mg modafinil reduces daytime somnolence in this population. In addition, a positive correlation was found between subjective reporting of the likelihood of taking a nap and craving and desire for Meth, as well as the likelihood of using Meth and whether Meth would make the participant feel better. The results of this study should be considered when investigating candidate medications for Meth-dependence, especially in those individuals who attribute their Meth use to overcoming deficits resulting from sleep abnormalities.