1. Dear Drugs-Forum readers: We are a small non-profit that runs one of the most read drug information & addiction help websites in the world. We serve over 4 million readers per month, and have costs like all popular websites: servers, hosting, licenses and software. To protect our independence we do not run ads. We take no government funds. We run on donations which average $25. If everyone reading this would donate $5 then this fund raiser would be done in an hour. If Drugs-Forum is useful to you, take one minute to keep it online another year by donating whatever you can today. Donations are currently not sufficient to pay our bills and keep the site up. Your help is most welcome. Thank you.
    PLEASE HELP

Anticonvulsant, anxiolytic, and sedative properties of the roots of Nauclea latifolia Smith in mice

Anticonvulsant, anxiolytic, and sedative properties of the roots of Nauclea latifolia Smith in mice

  1. BitterSweet
    E. Ngo Bum, G.S. Taiwe, F.C.O. Moto, G.T. Ngoupaye, G.C.N. Nkantchoua, M.M. Pelanken, S.V. Rakotonirina, A. Rakotonirina, Anticonvulsant, anxiolytic, and sedative properties of the roots of Nauclea latifolia Smith in mice, Epilepsy & Behavior, Volume 15, Issue 4, August 2009, Pages 434-440, ISSN 1525-5050, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yebeh.2009.05.014.
    (http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S152550500900300X)

    Abstract

    Root bark of Nauclea latifolia Smith (Rubiaceae) was evaluated for its anticonvulsant, anxiolytic, and sedative activity in mice. Animal models (maximal electroshock-, pentylenetetrazol-, and strychnine-induced convulsions; N-methyl-d-aspartate-induced turning behavior; elevated plus maze; stress-induced hyperthermia; open field; and diazepam-induced sleep) were used. The decoction from the bark of the roots of N. latifolia strongly increased the total sleep time induced by diazepam. It also protected mice against maximal electroshock-, pentylenetetrazol-, and strychnine-induced seizures. In addition, turning behavior induced by N-methyl-d-aspartate was inhibited. N. latifolia antagonized, in a dose-dependent manner, stress-induced hyperthermia and reduced body temperature. In the elevated plus maze, N. latifolia increased the number of entries into, percentage of entries into, and percentage of time in open arms, and reduced rearing, head dipping, and percentage of time in closed arms. In the open field test, N. latifolia increased crossing and reduced rearing and defecation. It could be concluded that the decoction of N. latifolia, used in traditional medicine in Cameroon in the treatment of fever, malaria, insomnia, anxiety and epilepsy seemed to possess, sedative, anticonvulsant, anxiolytic and antipyretic properties in mice.