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Attenuation of Alcohol Consumption by a Novel Nontoxic Ibogaine Analogue (18-Methoxycoronaridine) in

Attenuation of Alcohol Consumption by a Novel Nontoxic Ibogaine Analogue (18-Methoxycoronaridine) in

  1. ThirdEyeFloond
    Amir H. Rezvania, *, David H. Overstreeta, Ying Yanga, Isabelle M. Maisonneuveb, Upul K. Bandaragec, Martin E. Kuehnec and Stanley D. Glickb

    Abstract

    We previously reported that single administration of ibogaine, an indol alkaloid with antiaddictive properties, dose dependently reduced alcohol intake in three strains of alcohol-preferring rats. The present study examined the effect of different doses of a newly developed nontoxic ibogaine analogue, 18-methoxycoronaridine (18-MC), on alcohol intake. Selectively bred alcohol-preferring rats received a single intraperitoneal injection of vehicle or 5, 20 and 40 mg/kg of 18-MC at 9:30 AM, and their consumption of alcohol, water and food was measured for 24 h. Our results demonstrate that a single injection of 18-MC significantly and dose dependently attenuated alcohol consumption and preference and commensurately increased water intake. Only the highest dose of 18-MC significantly decreased food intake. Although the true mechanism of action of 18-MC in suppressing alcohol intake is not yet fully understood, it may, like ibogaine, exert its attenuating effects on alcohol consumption by modulating neurotransmitters believed to be involved in the regulation of alcohol intake.