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Availability of Opiates for Medical Needs

Availability of Opiates for Medical Needs

  1. Lunar Loops
    INCB report of 1996 first highlighted by stoneinfocus, but not uploaded.

    Report in cooperation with WHO, to
    ascertain whether Governments have fully implemented the recommendations contained in its special
    report of 1989, to identify Governments that have not yet fully implemented the recommendations, as
    well as their reasons, and to propose measures to improve the availability of opiates for medical purposes.
    The present special report includes a survey of all Governments, as well as inquiries to WHO and
    professional organizations. Sixty-five (31 per cent) of 209 Governments responded to the survey.
    A review of trends in the consumption of selected narcotic drugs was also conducted. The
    consumption of opiates, morphine in particular, was low and relatively stable until the mid-1980s. In the
    last 10 years, consumption of morphine and certain other narcotic drugs has increased significantly in
    some countries and is beginning to increase in others. This is largely the result of efforts by
    Governments, WHO and health professionals to improve relief of pain due to cancer. Nevertheless, the
    Board believes that the medical need for opiates is far from being fully satisfied in both less developed
    and developed countries. The Board presents its findings, conclusions and recommendations to
    Governments, the United Nations International Drug Control Programme, the Commission on Narcotic
    Drugs, WHO, international and regional organizations and professional associations.