1. Dear Drugs-Forum readers: We are a small non-profit that runs one of the most read drug information & addiction help websites in the world. We serve over 4 million readers per month, and have costs like all popular websites: servers, hosting, licenses and software. To protect our independence we do not run ads. We take no government funds. We run on donations which average $25. If everyone reading this would donate $5 then this fund raiser would be done in an hour. If Drugs-Forum is useful to you, take one minute to keep it online another year by donating whatever you can today. Donations are currently not sufficient to pay our bills and keep the site up. Your help is most welcome. Thank you.
    PLEASE HELP

Cannabinoids for the Treatment of Schizophrenia? A Balanced Neurochemical Framework for Both Adverse

Cannabinoids for the Treatment of Schizophrenia? A Balanced Neurochemical Framework for Both Adverse

  1. Terrapinzflyer
    Cannabinoids for the Treatment of Schizophrenia? A Balanced Neurochemical Framework for Both Adverse and Therapeutic Effects of Cannabis Use

    Abstract

    Recent studies have found that cannabinoids may improve neuropsychological performance, ameliorate negative symptoms, and have antipsychotic properties for a subgroup of the schizophrenia population. These findings are in contrast to the longstanding history of adverse consequences of cannabis use, predominantly on the positive symptoms, and a balanced neurochemical basis for these opposing views is lacking. This paper details a review of the neurobiological substrates of schizophrenia and the neurochemical effects of cannabis use in the normal population, in both cortical (in particular prefrontal) and subcortical brain regions. The aim of this paper is to provide a holistic neurochemical framework in which to understand how cannabinoids may impair, or indeed, serve to ameliorate the positive and negative symptoms as well as cognitive impairment. Directions in which future research can proceed to resolve the discrepancies are briefly discussed.



    Carissa M. Coulston,1,2 Michael Perdices,1,3 Antony F. Henderson,1 and Gin S. Malhi1,2
    1Discipline of Psychiatry, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    2Department of Psychiatry, CADE Clinic, Royal North Shore Hospital, St. Leonards, Sydney, NSW 2065, Australia
    3Department of Neurology, Royal North Shore Hospital, St. Leonards, Sydney, NSW 2065, Australia

    Received 17 November 2009; Revised 29 April 2010; Accepted 14 June 2010

    Academic Editor: David C. Henderson